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Arrabar was the capital city of Chondath and one of the primary port cities of the Vilhon Reach,[12][1][16] known for its crime and corruption.[17] The heraldic symbol of the city was three golden balls on a white background.[18]

Shining Arrabar is more than the nickname for the city of Arrabar, it is an attitude shared by its people. But those who crave to control other nations are most assuredly doomed to repeat their past mistakes.
— Mitrol Kran, Sage of Alaghôn[19]

Description[]

The sleepy city was an ancient and sprawling megapolis, though the people kept it tidy, clean, and maintained.[12] The most crucial part of Arrabar were its docks and harbors. Only several strategically planned and well-defended harbors in the cities of Hlath and Arrabar were deep enough to allow deep-draft sea vessels to dock. Most other harbors were shallow.[20] One of the most distinctive features of Arrabar was greenery. The city was filled with lush gardens, exotic pants, vines crawling up trellises, and unending hanging pots and planters inside and on the city streets.[21]

Geography[]

A map of Arrabar.

He took a quick glance around and, despite the urgency of his goal, had to stand for a moment and simply appreciate the beauty of the entire city spread out before him. At night, it took on a different but no less enchanting demeanor, with its twinkling lights spread out in undulating waves across the gentle hills stretching from the perimeter walls down to the bay. The water there glowed in its own right, the shimmering light of the bright, nearly full moon glimmering across its glassy surface. It was a magnificent city.
— Vambran Matrell's musings[22]


The city of Arrabar was a sprawling port megapolis, neatly sectioned into several districts nestled around the central Governor District. The west-most part of the city was the Port District. To the north laid the Warehouse District, Merchants District to the south, and the Living District to the east.[23]

The grandest structure in Arrabar was the Generon, the palace of the Lord of Arrabar, located in the Governor District. It comprised a stately dome that glittered with gold and silver. It was circled by barracks and fortifications, staffed by Lord Wianar's personal army.[12][24][23]

Another distinction Arrabar had from many other metropolises were numerous canals that honeycombed the Port District and stretched towards neighboring boroughs of the city – the Netherwaters, or simply "Nethers" or "Below" (collective terms that covered the canals, its docks, and the basin). The canals converged on the "turning basin" south of the Warehouse District and stretched to the sea. The canals were used by civilians and boats transporting trade goods and narrowboat barges that transported the city's trash and waste to the Shallows (a monster-infested bay down the coast outside the city). Many of the buildings in the canal-honeycombed district could be described as being on the "waterfront." Some "waterfront" places, such as the sprawling tavern of the Crying Claw had small docks where visitors could leave their boats tied up until they were ready to leave the establishment. With time and Arrabar's growth, most canals were roofed over. The "turning basin" had a "light well" atop of it – an opening that was smaller in size than the basin itself. Many of the "waterfront" buildings had deep basements due to rising street levels with time. The canals functioned as storm drains through the city via gratings. The guard of Arrabar policed the canals to ensure no blockage ensued. Clogging of canals cost money to the city and its busy trade; for the same reason, fishing from boats, shores, or balconies was forbidden. The Netherwaters had a shady reputation due to some lowlifes and criminals who dwelled there. Because of that, some Arrabarrans disliked talking about the Below.[25]

Government[]

Shining Lords of Arrabar[]

The rulership of Arrabar was held by the Lord of Arrabar, who was served loyally and unrelentingly by most warriors of Chondath. The lordship expanded to all the cities of Chondath.[10] The seat of power was located in the grand palace of Generon.[24] The rulership of Chondath was held by the Illistine family, after Anthony Illistine united the free cities into the nation of Chondath in 139 DR and ended in 300 DR.[2]

In the late 14th century DR, Lord Eles Wianar[19] and his ruling family of Arrabar were called "decadent, evil, and corrupt" by General Clas Denwith of Sespech.[26] Eles Wianar's reign was maintained via intrigue, deceit, and manipulation. Lord Wianar kept the free cities distracted and manipulated through constant strings of petty conflicts, disputes, and ancient rivalries. Arrabar collected taxes and supplied the free cities with mercenaries to be used against each other.[19] Locally, the Shining Lord employed a small army of spies that infiltrated all noble houses of Arrabar. The sheer power of the ruling noble house allowed Eles Wianar to confront and murder those who dared to send assassins openly. The same was true regarding those who attempted to leverage the Chondathan throne away from him.[27] House Wianar's ambitions were to take control of all the free cities of Chondath and surrounding lands. However, the main obstacle in the Lord's way was the Emerald Enclave.[19]

Assembly of Representatives[]

The Lord of Arrabar hosted an annual assembly of representatives from the free-cities of Chondath. The event lasted for an entire week and was used to discuss pressing national matters. The chairperson who helmed each assemble was determined via a lottery. Additional assemblies were held during the times of strife, and representatives of neighboring nations, such as Turmish, were invited.[11]

Noble Houses of Arrabar[]

The manors that belonged to various noble families of Arrabar were located along the outer city walls. Each of the noble families owned a small private army.[12]

  • House Wianar: the ruling noble house of Arrabar that employed the League of Lightning Mercenary Company in the mid-14th century DR.[28] The total mercenary count exceeded 25,000 footmen and cavalry used in defense of the city.[19]
  • House Cauldyl: arguably the most sneering and pretentious family in the entire city of Arrabar.[29]
  • House Darowdryn: the most private of Arrabar's noble families, notable for their light, almost wight hair,[30] led by Matriarch Ariskrit Darowdryn in the late-14th century DR.[31]
  • House Elphaendim: a merchant house led by the wizard patriarch – Thalammose Elphaendim in the 14th century DR.[32]
  • House Matrell: the noble house that held a position within the Waukeenar and led by Dregaul Matrell in the late 14th century DR.[30]
  • House Mercatio: a noble merchant family with Adyan Mercatio being its scion in the late 14th century DR.[30]
  • House Mestel: the old merchant family that birthed Obiron Matrell who changed his name and started his own House after being shunned by nobility of Arrabar for being bastard-born.[30]
  • House Rohden: a noble merchant family with Horial Rohden being its scion in the late 14th century DR.[30]

Trade[]

A map of Chondath showing Arrabar's location.

Arrabar's economy was built on trading that took place on its open market. Merchants traveled to Arrabar to purchase goods and re-sale them in the versions to the north and west.[11] Local merchants stopped in smaller cities of the Reach, such as Timindar, to purchase abundant quality produce for re-sale in the markets of Arrabar.[33] Arrabar stood in the key mercantile location of the Reach, at the end of two key trade roads: the southern Golden Road and the Emerald Way that ran across Chondath and ended at Hlath. These made the city a center for the Vilhon trade and kept it wealthy.[12] Sea routes cemented a solid trade relationship between Arrabar and Cormyr as far back as 389 DR.[34] Arrabar's wealthy inhabitants enjoyed exotic imports such as Mulhorandi dark ale, strong coffee from Tashalar, and a wide variety of balaumo.[5]

Industry[]

The people of Arrabar largely engaged in trade, crafting, fishing, and mercenary work as part of mercenary companies. These included both private armies that were permanently stationed in the capital and companies that were only based in the city and rested there between assignments in other lands.[12] Among these were the Sapphire Crescent.[35]

Culture[]

Like many in the Reach, the folk of Arrabar was wary of wizards.[12] Loyalist warriors of Chondath often refused the use of magic items, excluding simple enchanted weapons and armor. After the disastrous Rotting War, many believed that Arrabar could still carry the magical remnants of deadly plagues, ready to be unleashed once again. The distrust of spellcasters was so extreme that warriors often presented wizards with an ultimatum never to weave spells in their presence or leave the group (or even be slain). Executions of mages were a common occurrence.[10][36]

The city-state of Arrabar conscripted young able-bodied men and women to serve in its military for four years. Individuals who stayed with the military were respected, and military careers were looked upon favorably by all inhabitants of Chondath.[19] Learned citizens often had decorated foreheads with dots that indicated the level of their education, common across the Reach, most notably in Turmish.[36][37]

Naraebul[note 1] was a type of an Arrabarran satchel with hiden compartments to keep moeny pouches safe from pickpockets.[38]

Cuisine[]

Arrabarran cuisine was a mixture of common Faerûnean dishes with a rich use of spices common in the Vilhon Reach. Favorite stret handfood of Arrabar were thaek buns - large bready buns filled with fragrant spicy meats, mushrooms, and onions, drowned in tomato and pepper sauce.[38] Small honeyed buns were a cheap commoners' delight sold in Arrabarran bakeries.[7] Morningfeast served in noble houses consisted of platters of scrambled eggs, mixed with cheese and lemon-wine sauce, large fish, stuffed with potatoes and saurages, followed by hand-ripped breads, served with spreads and condiments that included sinlky apple butter, fresh cream, and fruit compote.[39] Tea was another popular meal among the nobility. Tea gatherings were accompanyied with incessent gossip, expensive exported tea blends, and delicate sweet wafers, topped with whipped honey.[40]

Arrabarran eateries were called aszraun by the locals. Food served often included such dishes as sauced roasted beef and lamb talthaek, talthaek being a Chondathan word that meant a type of gravy-filled meat pie.[41]

Festivals[]

Emriana Matrell in Arrabar.

It was customary for Arrabar's noble or wealthy and influential visitors to visit Generon and the Lord upon each visit. In the late 14th century DR, Lord Eles Wianar preferred to stay connected to important men and women of the Reach, often dispersing honorary titles.[36]

  • The Night of Ghosts festival was the annual gala ball organized by the Lord of Arrabar. The most influential and rich people of the Vilhon Reach were in attendance, including the Lord's enemies and political rivals. The name of the ball came from actors dressed as ghosts and other monsters who spent the night terrorizing esteemed guests.[36]
  • A Chondathan festival of the Night of Dancing took place at night in the first half of Flamerule. The festival celebrated the new moon, darkness before the dawn, and its symbolism concerning Chondath's return to its past glory.[36]
  • The Waukeenar festival of the Spheres took place on the 10th of Tarsakh. During which the city was filled with music and celebrations as the clergy of Waukeen paraded through Arrabar tossing glass spheres filled coins, knick-knacks, gems and trinkets into adoring crowds.[42]

Defenses[]

Thanks to mercenaries, Arrabar was quite strong militarily, and it could pose a threat in any land.[12] Its heavy fortification provided additional defense.[11] The marine ports of Arrabar were well defended by ballistae. Chondathan navy was limited in size, following the war against a wizard Yrkhetep.[20]In the late 14th century DR, the armies of Arrabar were called "under-trained and woefully inadequate for the battle they wish to wage against mighty Sespech." The person who said that, of course, was General Clas Denwith of Sespech.[26]

Arrabar's defenses and troops, the Municipal Guard of Arrabar, were broken into numbered squads. The 6th Municipal Guard were considered to be the best of Arrabar.[43] Typical equipment carried by the Municipal Guard included longswords and short bows. These troops considered the undead to be their sworn enemies.[44]

Use of speak with dead spell was a part of the protocol when the Municipal Guard of Arrabar faced with murder cases, including the incidents in which individuals were slain by the members of the Guard. Clergy of the Church of Waukeen were invited to perform the divine ritual.[45]

History[]

Arrabar was setled in Year of the Barbed Wind, 50 DR. The same year as the cities of Mussum and Samra, all three situated on the south-eastern shores of the Vilhon Reach.[3][46][13]

A plague victim of the Rotting War.

In Year of Thirteen Prides Lost, 132 DR, the city of Mimph was settled to the west from Arrabar, threatening to lure away the city's populous. However, Arrabar's armies leveled Mimph in Year of the Halfling's Dale, 135 DR, securing the city's supremacy for the years to come.[14] The same year, Azoun Obarskyr I, then the crown prince of Cormyr, sailed his flagship into the harbors of Arrabar. Yearning for adventure, the royal youth snuck out into Chondalwood while his advisors negotiated trade deals between Cormyr and Chondath. By Tymora's grace, the prince faced Dima, the self-proclaimed Djinni-Lord, a marauding wizard. He slew the villain if bards were to be believed; however, in reality, the wizard was destroyed by Amedahast, the Coryrean Royal Wizard. Azoun Obarskyr the First donated most of Dima's vast treasures to Arrabar, strengthening the trade relations between the two nations.[34]

Year of the Resolute Courtesans, 139 DR saw the creation of another neighboring city - Shamph, along the Emerald Corridor trade route.[14][47] That year the armies of Chondath entered Chondalwood and destroyed the elven city of Ariel-than. The event was named the Battle of the Elven Tears. Within six months that followed, cities of Arrabar, Mussum, Samra, and Shamph joined an alliance, forming Chondath under the rule of Anthony Illistine.[13][14] By Year of the War Wyvern, 258 DR, Arrabar gained significant power as the seat of Chondathan leadership, became a center of learning, prestige, gaining the moniker of the "Shining Arrabar." Along with political power, Arrabar adopted Nimpeth's slave trade.[2]

From 900 DR through 902 DR, Arrabar was consumed by the Chondathan civil war later named the Rotting War. In 901 DR, arch wizards of Arrabar and Reth joined the war reigning devastation and death using ancient Netherese magics. In 902 DR, troops from Reth clashed in combat with joined armies of Arrabar and Hlath in the Fiends of Nun in the foothills of the Akanapeaks. The rulers of Chondathan cities craved an easy win and ordered their wizards to summon deadly necromantic plagues. The resulting epidemic killed two-thirds of the Chondathan armies in minutes. The survivors took the plague home, spreading the deadly disease. The devastating outcome of the Rotting Wars ensured Arrabar's loss of influence. All the cities of Chondath, apart from Iljak declared independence, returning to their city-state statuses once more.[1][48]

Circa 1017 DR, several grand mercenary companies of Arrabar and other cities of the nation elected to leave Chondath in a mass-exodus. They grew disenfranchised with wards and honorless bloodshed. The mercenaries, along with their families, traveling hospitals, mobile sanctuaries, and courts, slowly traveled south-east until they reached the unclaimed lands on the north-western shores of the Akanamere. With time the yellow rolling hills and valleys of scattered ruins were turned into militaristic yet bloodless Blade Kingdoms.[49][50]

In Year of the Bloodbird, 1346 DR, the city of Arrabar came under a sudden and devastating attack by one of the Wizards of the Tome, Jaulothan Marlyx. The wizard materialized in the center of the busy city, along with two beholders, showering the city with spells of death and destruction. Arrabar by a group of desperate local magic-users who summoned tanar'ri. The demons destroyed Jaulothan and the floating aberrations only to break out of their summoners' control, creating further tumult. These tanar'ri were eventually tracked down and banished back to the Lower planes.[51]

Soon after, a holy artifact of the Church of Sune - the Sash of Sune, surfaced in the city of Arrabar. The item was in possession of a wizard who spent his time researching its magics. Over forty of Sune's devotes helm an attack on the wizard's palatial estate and realized the holy relic. The Sash of Sune was kept secured at the Towers of Passion, a monastery in rural Chondath, until it was stolen once again.[52]

In 1356 DR, Shinthala Deepcrest of the Emerald Enclave entered the city of Arrabar bearing a threat to the ruling family. She forbade the city's expansion into Chondalwood following the Retreat of many of its elven inhabitants. She reminded the Lord of Arrabar about the Crushed Helm Massacre of the ages past and promised death to any potential Arrabarran invaders.[53]

In 1357 DR, a pair of green dragon was spotted in the skies over Arrabar. It was presumed that the pair was a mated couple that made lair in Chondalwood or the Winterwood.[54]

1358 DR brought another war to Chondath. An evil wizard Yrkhetep, in reality, an arcanaloth, attempted to usurp power over Chondath and Turmish.[55] The short was decimated troops and navy of Arrabarm, leaving it vulnerable to ambitious pirates of the Sea of Fallen Stars.[20] In Kythorn of 1367 DR, a hunting party, allegedly, encountered a tedious two-headed gray dragon-thing in the Chondalwood. This testimony was confirmed via magic performed by the hunters' financiers. The hunters described the creature to be as big as five ships, a bone stinger-tipped tail. Sages were unable to find any information on the monster's existence in Arrabarran archives nor was identified.[56]

By 1370 DR, Arrabar became a target of Fzoul Chembryl and his Zhentarim ambitions. He aimed to have temples of Iyachtu Xvim erected in Arrabar, along with other cities of the Sea of Fallen Stars. On top of that, his end goal was a takeover or alliance with Arrabar and Reth, in order to secure Zhent slave trade with the Lake of Steam region and its supply of humanoid sacrifices for the Church of Iyachtu Xvim. If Fzoul's domination of Arrabar and Reth was successful, his next goal was taking control of the entire of Chondath and Sespech.[57][58] The Zhentarim plans, however, were cut short by the death of Iyachtu Xvim in 1372 DR and resurrection of Bane.[59]

Politics of Chondath.

During the same period, Lord Simon Dessino allied himself with a gang of fire giants attempting to weaken the city of Lachom, encouraging an alliance with Arrabar against the false, manufactured threat.[15]

By 1372 DR, the empire of Chondath was much shrunken[12] under the leadership of Lord Eles Wianar who maintained his seat of power in the grand palace of Generon.[24]

Year of Rogue Dragons, 1373 DR brought a year-long disastrous Rage of Dragons, though Arrabar emerged unscathed from these events. Gaulauntyr, an adult topaz dragon who resided in a wood manor just south-east of Arrabar became affected by the Rage and rained destruction on nearby Nimpeth vineyards.[60]

The calamity of Spellplague in 1385 DR laid ruin to the nation of Chondath, seemingly destroying cities of Arrabar, Hlath, Iljak, Reth, and Shamph on the southern shores of the Reach.[61]

After the return of Mystra during the Second Sundering, the land of Chondath was healed, and as of late-15th century DR, Arrabar was back on the map and served as a port stop for travelers across the Reach and the Golden Road.[62]

Rumors & Legends[]

  • Sometime after 1346 DR, rumors of a powerful magical artifact - the Mask of Mysteries, began popping up across Waterdeep, Skullport, Westgate, and Arrabar. These stories claimed the Mask was available for sale, but most of these rumors were likely false, as shortly after, the Dark Hand of the Shadowlord, a powerful cleric of Mask in Calimshan, claimed to own the Mask.[63]
  • The Netherwaters were rumored to hide dangerous aquatic monsters.[25]

Notable Locations[]

Inns & Taverns[]

  • Crying Claw, moderately-priced a waterfront tavern that catered to the middle class Arrabarrans, adventurers, and sea vessel captains. Circa 1370 DR, the establishment was ran by a secret Harper agent, Jenis Glowarm.[23]
  • Dark She Looks Upon Me, a busy and popular aszraun located in the Mercantile District, known fo its roasted beef and lamb talthaek.[41]
  • Efusio's Cafe, an open-air eatery with tables placed around a plaza that specialized in imported goods such as strong Tashalaran coffee, Mulhorandi dark, and tobacco.[5]
  • Seaside, an expensive and posh tavern located on the city's waterfront that catered to clientele flush with coin.[23]

Temples & Shrines[]

  • Temple of Lathander, the location where the Church of Lathander kept the holy script of their faith - the Tome of the Morning in 1221 DR. Since then, the tome has left the temple and the city of Arrabar.[64]
  • Temple of Lliira, served as the place of worship for the Church of Lliira and Church of Waukeen.[65] The Temple of Lliira stood on the center-east border of the Port District.[66]
  • Temple of Tempus, a major temple led by General Vandemar Cordwin in the late 14th century DR.[26] The Temple of Tempus was located close to the city's center, on the eastern edge of the Governor's District.[66]
  • Temple of Tymora, the main place of worship for the Church of Tymora in Arrabar.[67]
  • Temple of Silvanus, a large temple and the center of Silvanus's worship.[68] This temple could be found bordering the northern part of the Merchants District.[66]

Other[]

  • Academia Vilhonus, the college that started the tradition of painting dots on foreheads to indicate the education level. The Academia kept a grand library, filed with historical tomes.[37]
  • Neely's Cheese, a cheesemaker's shop located in the Living District, on the Slake Street. The store was ran by Neely himself circa 1373 DR.[69]

Inhabitants[]

Notable Organizations[]

  • Band of the Flaming Sword, an adventuring company from Arrabar, tumbled a merchant house of Ravens Bluff - the Wyrmhoard House.[70]
  • Company of the Singing Dawn, a mercenary company active circa 1358 DR, led by Solara.[71]
  • Bronzespur, the local Heralds to the city of Arrabar who served the Heralds of Faerûn.[72][73]
  • Merchants' Guild, the independent guild that feuded with Lord Eles Wianar who sought to install his son as the Guildmaster of Merchants circa 1370 DR.[23]
  • Red Wizards established an enclave in Arrabar with Lord Wianar's permission.[12]
  • Six Swords of Arrabar, an adventuring company that discovered Hundelve and Irthgarl abandoned in the 1320s DR.[74]
  • Windriders, a griffon-mounted mercenary company led by Bren Wingblade circa 1358 DR.[75]

Notable Individuals[]

Appendix[]

Notes[]

  1. Italiciced foreign words mentioned on the page are in the Chondathan language.

Gallery[]

Appearances[]

Adventures
Swords of the Iron Legion
Referenced only
Shadowdale: The Scouring of the Land
Novels
Once Around the RealmsWhisper of WavesLies of LightScream of StoneThe Last Paladin of IlmaterThe Sapphire CrescentThe Ruby GuardianThe Emerald Scepter
Referenced only
The Shadow StoneThe Yellow SilkFinal GateNecessary SacrificesViper's KissShadowbred
Organized Play & Licensed Adventures
Referenced only
Foreign Affairs

References[]

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Connections[]

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