FANDOM


The Lower City of Baldur's Gate was the southern region of the metropolis, located between the great wall of Balduran, that divided it from the Upper City, and the shores of the River Chionthar. It served as the Gate's mercantile hub, housing the city's docks, along with a great many businesses, inns, taverns and temples. Trade and commerce were of paramount importance throughout the Lower City.[2]

DescriptionEdit

"In the Lower City, we live and work atop each other untidily"
  — Asturgel, Baldurian sage[2]

The Lower City of Baldur's Gate was shaped like a crescent that surrounded the city's Gray Harbor. Built atop sloping bluffs, the narrow cobblestone streets of the Lower City twisted around one another to form the regions city-blocks.[3] The tight rows of conjoined, stone buildings featured common characteristics such as slate roofs and vibrantly-painted shutters that were firmly secured in the evening hours.[2]

Most of the Lower City was covered in a near-continued fog that rolled in from the Chionthar River. As a result the stone streets were damp and slippery and visibility was low, even during the daytime. The darkness and mist were abated, to an extent, by the number oil-and-wick street lamps that dotted many of the street corners, particularly those in the nice neighborhoods.[2]

HistoryEdit

Originally known as Heapside, the Lower City came about as a result of the great influx of traders, sailors and craftspeople flocked to Baldur's Gate, then known as Gray Harbor. The events of the Tax Revolt and the establishment of the Council of Four led to the construction of additional walls around the Lower City, lending it the same protection and security previously benefited the Upper City.[4]

The Lower City was riddled with crime for years following the city's founding. During the 14th century, the ambitious Baldurian warrior Eltan united many mercenaries from across the Sword Coast, and formed the Flaming Fist. In doing so he earned a position as one of the city's Grand Dukes and set about to improve the Lower City. He used part of the city's coffers to pay the mercenaries and tasked them with serving as a police force for Baldur's Gate. While crime was still an issue in the years that followed, the Lower City was no longer lawless cesspool that it had been for years.[4]

DistrictsEdit

Seatower

Seatower encompassed the entire south-western area of Baldur's Gate, including the west-most docks of the harbor. Notable landmarks included the Candlekeep Chandlery and the great Seatower of Balduran,[1] a beacon of the Flaming Fist's statue within the city.[5]

Bloomridge

This rather affluent neighborhood was home to the successful merchants, seafarers and landowners whose wealth, if not their station, mirrored that of the Baldurian patriar—to a notably lesser extent. Along with the numerous cafes and boutiques found within, Bloomridge house a couple of manor houses,[2] including those of the eccentric mage Mandorcai and the adventurer-turned-councilor, Coran.[6]

The Steeps

Located just south of the Wide, this neighborhood contained the western-most city blocks nestled between the Old Wall and the Gray Harbor. Within its streets was both the Counting House and a temple of Umberlee.[1]

Heapside

With a rather eclectic selection of landmarks and establishments, Heapside was one of the more diverse districts of Baldur's Gate.From the rowdy and dangerous clientele of the Blushing Mermaid,[7] to the pious Ilmatari of the Shrine of the Suffering,[8] Baldurians from nearly all walks of life spent their time in Heapside.[9][1]

Eastway

The district of Eastway housed a number of famous Baldurian establishments, such as the Blade and Stars inn, the Elfsong Tavern and the Low Lantern festhall.[1]

Brampton

The city blocks in the southeastern section of the city composed the district of Brampton. Unlike the other neighborhoods, it did not feature many well-known landmarks or buildings.[1]

AppendixEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Dungeon Master's screen included in Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). Murder in Baldur's Gate. Edited by Dawn J. Geluso. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). “Campaign Guide”. In Dawn J. Geluso ed. Murder in Baldur's Gate (Wizards of the Coast), p. 18. ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
  3. Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). “Campaign Guide”. In Dawn J. Geluso ed. Murder in Baldur's Gate (Wizards of the Coast), p. 6. ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). “Campaign Guide”. In Dawn J. Geluso ed. Murder in Baldur's Gate (Wizards of the Coast), p. 32. ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
  5. Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). “Campaign Guide”. In Dawn J. Geluso ed. Murder in Baldur's Gate (Wizards of the Coast), p. 20. ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
  6. Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). “Campaign Guide”. In Dawn J. Geluso ed. Murder in Baldur's Gate (Wizards of the Coast), p. 19. ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
  7. Ed Greenwood (1994). Volo's Guide to the Sword Coast. (TSR, Inc), p. 20. ISBN 1-5607-6940-1.
  8. Ed Greenwood (1994). Volo's Guide to the Sword Coast. (TSR, Inc), p. 13. ISBN 1-5607-6940-1.
  9. Ed Greenwood (1994). Volo's Guide to the Sword Coast. (TSR, Inc), p. 8. ISBN 1-5607-6940-1.
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.