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The Upper City was the exceedingly-wealthy region of Baldur's Gate, that lay north of the city's oldest wall and its namesake gate.[1] Home to the city's noble patriar families, it was a wholly beautiful and nearly-entirely secure region of the port-metropolis.[3]

While the grand buildings and estate-houses of the Upper City were bustling with behind-the-scenes activity of personal retainers, lines of servants and skilled artisans, the streets outside were well-ordered and at times even serene. The regular hustle-and-bustle of city life was most strongly felt in the vast marketplace known as the Wide.[4]

DescriptionEdit

Unlike the Lower City, which sloped down towards the River Chionthar, this area of Baldur's Gate was largely flat and level elevated high above the docks and the river's coast.[1]

Its wide, raised roads were lined with vibrant-colored buildings. While it was home to the numerous, vast mansion-homes of the city's patriar, it housed a few number inns and absolutely no taverns or public drinking halls.[5] To keep a peaceful atmosphere, street music, noisy or disruptive activities, along with businesses or establishments that exuded any manner of foul odors, were strictly prohibited.[1]

During the daytime hours the Upper City was home to a number of different sights: entrepreneurial businessmen tending to their investments, merchants setting up their stalls and peddling their wares in the Wide, or caravan goods being ported through the streets, as their pack animals were taken through the Outer City to be reunited at either the Black Dragon or Basilisk Gate, to continue their journey along the Trade Way. The patriar fluttered around the Upper City, living lives of joy and leisure, dining in their private clubs and personal homes.[4]

The Upper City was well-lit at night, both by magically-enchanted lamps and the moonlight that illuminated the elevated streets that rose above the fog that rolled over the rest of the city. Except for patrols of the Watch and the accompanying apprentice-wizards that maintained the light spells in the streetlamps,[6] the Upper City was deserted at night. The nightlife of the Baldurian patriar-class was a private affair that was continued indoors, within their vast estates.[7]

DefensesEdit

Law enforcement and defense of the Upper City fell solely to well-trained police force known as the Watch, who operated exclusively within its borders. Jurisdiction over the surrounding regions of Baldur's Gate were left to the soldiers of the Flaming Fist. They maintained a long-standing loyalty with the patriar families and were granted living quarters within the Upper City's walls.[5]

The Watch maintained a curfew within the Upper City. Everyone but the patriar themselves, who were all recognizable by sight, and their servants or guests, who could be identified by appropriate uniforms or a Watch-issued badge, were escorted to other areas of the city.[5]

Order and smooth operations of business within the Wide was overseen by the Bailiff of the Wide, his or her officers and their respective assistants. The Bailiff worked under the supervision of the city's Purse Master.[8]

HistoryEdit

The Upper City of Baldur's Gate was originally known as the "Old Town" of Gray Harbor, the original name of the bay settlement on the River Chionthar. It was separated from newer buildings that comprised the region of "Heapside", built south of the great wall that was financed by Balduran's famous expedition to Anchorome.[2]

As the population of Gray Harbor grew, the farmers of Old Town taxed the goods that came in from Heapside through Baldur's gate in the great wall. The captains of ships that docked in Gray Harbor, most of whom were former colleagues and associates of Balduran, resisted the Old Towners and led a revolt against their unjust taxation. They besieged the wall, broke through the gate and marched upon the fort of High Hall in Old Town.[2]

The senior captains of Heapside called for an armistice and withdrew from their assault before outright slaughter. The Council of Four was formed from this truce, which saw unification between the divided regions of the same settlement. After that day the Old Town of Gray Harbor became the Upper City of Baldur's Gate.[2]

DistrictsEdit

Trade Way to WaterdeepCitadel GateBlack Dragon GateSea GateManor GateGond GateBaldur's GateHeap GateWatch CitadelHigh HallHigh House of WondersManorbornTemples DistrictCitadel StreetsThe WideLower CityOuter CityGray HarborUpper City w grid

A map of the Upper and Lower Cities of Baldur's Gate in 1479 DR. Hovering over the map will reveal named locations. Clicking will link to the article for that location.

The Upper City was comprised of four distinct districts, all of which have a grid address so that they can be found in the accompanying map of Outer City, circa 1479 DR:[9]

Citadel Streets (A2)

Located in the city's northern wall, this district was comprised of the walled-off Watch Citadel (A2) and several surrounding buildings.[5][9]

Manorborn (A4)

This western district was home to grandest of the Upper City's patriar estates. These noble-born citizens of these old families, whose heritage dated back to Balduran's grand return, saw themselves as the heirs to the "true city".[5]

Temples District (B2)

In addition to housing the famous keep of High Hall (B2),[10][9] the Temples District had some of the longest-standing and most influential temples of Baldur's Gate. Most notable among these was the High House of Wonders (B3), the grand holy house dedicated to the Wonderbringer, Gond.[5]

The Wide (C1)

This vast expanse served as both an open-air market and a public civic plaza. During most days of the Calendar of Harptos, the Wide was lined with vendor stalls and merchant booths. On special occasions, such as Highharvestide, it served as the venue for city-wide celebrations or private events, such as concerts and weddings.[1]

InhabitantsEdit

The Upper City was home to the entirety of the privileged patriar families of Baldur's Gate. Members of the Baldurian noble class were accompanied by those individuals who served, as their forbears had, as their professional stewards. These skilled tradespeople, tailors, jewelers, gourmet chefs and the like, were considered somewhat "upper-class" like their employers, though nowhere near the same level.[3][1]

AppendixEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). “Campaign Guide”. In Dawn J. Geluso ed. Murder in Baldur's Gate (Wizards of the Coast), p. 8. ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). “Campaign Guide”. In Dawn J. Geluso ed. Murder in Baldur's Gate (Wizards of the Coast), p. 32. ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). “Campaign Guide”. In Dawn J. Geluso ed. Murder in Baldur's Gate (Wizards of the Coast), p. 6. ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). “Campaign Guide”. In Dawn J. Geluso ed. Murder in Baldur's Gate (Wizards of the Coast), p. 28. ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). “Campaign Guide”. In Dawn J. Geluso ed. Murder in Baldur's Gate (Wizards of the Coast), p. 9. ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
  6. Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). “Campaign Guide”. In Dawn J. Geluso ed. Murder in Baldur's Gate (Wizards of the Coast), p. 30. ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
  7. Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). “Campaign Guide”. In Dawn J. Geluso ed. Murder in Baldur's Gate (Wizards of the Coast), p. 31. ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
  8. Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). “Campaign Guide”. In Dawn J. Geluso ed. Murder in Baldur's Gate (Wizards of the Coast), p. 12. ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 Dungeon Master's screen included in Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). Murder in Baldur's Gate. Edited by Dawn J. Geluso. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
  10. Ed Greenwood, Matt Sernett, Steve Winter (August 20, 2013). “Campaign Guide”. In Dawn J. Geluso ed. Murder in Baldur's Gate (Wizards of the Coast), p. 10. ISBN 0-7869-6463-4.
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