A blueleaf was a type of tree found in Faerûn. Bluewood was the name of the wood taken from this tree.[2]

Description[edit | edit source]

The tree resembled a large maple.[4] It was so named for the color of its leaves, which were a strange, gleaming blue and had many points.[2] They actually glowed with a faint, blue light.[4]

The wood of the tree was surprisingly durable; the relatively thin trunk rarely broke, even when under extreme stress. They bent in winds and under snows, and in winter they could stabilize snow tunnels over roads that sheltered travelers. Blueleafs often grew in thick copses and typically reached heights of 40 feet (12 meters).[2]

Usage[edit | edit source]

A piece of blueleaf wood used in crafting.

Blueleaf leaves and sap could be crushed to make a bright blue dye often used in clothing manufacture in the North. These could also be burned to produce vivid, jumping blue flames that were favored by minstrels and storytellers for special effects.[2][4]

The wood of the blueleaf tree, known as bluewood, was used by Volodni craftsfolk to make weapons and armor. Bluewood was magically treated to become as hard as steel, though it weighed half as much.[3]

Habitats[edit | edit source]

Trivia[edit | edit source]

A blueleaf tree was the location of a portal between Eveningstar and Suzail.[13]

Appendix[edit | edit source]

Appearances[edit | edit source]

Novels
Farthest ReachSword of the Gods
Video Games
Tales from Candlekeep: Tomb of Annihilation

Notes[edit | edit source]

  1. Although The Shining South (1993) states that the Forest of Amtar was primarily blueleaf trees, this was retconned to be suth trees in Shining South, published in 2004.

Further Reading[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Thomas Reid (October 2004). Shining South. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 36. ISBN 0-7869-3492-1.
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 79. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Richard Baker, Matt Forbeck, Sean K. Reynolds (May 2003). Unapproachable East. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 58. ISBN 0-7869-2881-6.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 James Butler, Elizabeth T. Danforth, Jean Rabe (September 1994). “The Settled Lands”. In Karen S. Boomgarden ed. Elminster's Ecologies (TSR, Inc), p. 12. ISBN 1-5607-6917-3.
  5. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Edited by Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 130. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  6. Eric L. Boyd (2006-05-03). Environs of Waterdeep (Zipped PDF). Wizards of the Coast. p. 4. Archived from the original on 2016-08-16. Retrieved on 2009-10-07.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Ed Greenwood and Jason Carl (July 2002). Silver Marches. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 133. ISBN 0-7869-2835-2.
  8. Ed Greenwood and Jason Carl (July 2002). Silver Marches. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 23. ISBN 0-7869-2835-2.
  9. Ed Greenwood (2000). Volo's Guide to Baldur's Gate II. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 71. ISBN 0-7869-1626-5.
  10. Richard Baker, Bruce R. Cordell, David Noonan, Matthew Sernett, James Wyatt (March 2007). Cormyr: The Tearing of the Weave. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 39. ISBN 978-0-7869-4119-3.
  11. Richard Baker, Bruce R. Cordell, David Noonan, Matthew Sernett, James Wyatt (March 2007). Cormyr: The Tearing of the Weave. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 76. ISBN 978-0-7869-4119-3.
  12. Anne Gray McCready et al. (March 1994). Elves of Evermeet. (TSR, Inc), p. 10. ISBN 1-5607-6829-0.
  13. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 113. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
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