The blunderbuss, also known derisively as the Gondgun, was a variation of the arquebus.[2]

Description[edit | edit source]

Like any arquebus, the blunderbuss consisted of a wooden stock, metal barrel, and a matchlock firing mechanism. Unlike a standard arquebus, this weapon had a wide bore and a trumpet-flaring barrel.[2][4] They were also larger and heavier, weighing around 12 pounds (5.4 kilograms).[4]

Blunderbusses that came from Lantan typically had the symbol of Gond stamped on the butt of their stock.[1]

Weaponology[edit | edit source]

Due to the design of a blunderbuss, it had less muzzle velocity than a standard arquebus. Meaning it was less accurate, had less penetrating power,[6] and very poor range.[2][6] Due to their size and weight, a blunderbuss also required support in order to keep its barrel aimed when firing.[4]

Their advantage over the standard arquebus was that, rather than requiring a projectile carefully shaped for its bore,[6] anything that could be fit down its barrel, such as nails or stones, could be used as a projectile.[2][6] A blunderbuss could also fit several projectiles, rather than one,[6] and their barrels were designed to scatter their shot across a wide arc.[7] Together these made it so blunderbusses had the potential to hit several targets simultaneously.[2]

Like any arquebus, they were sturdy enough to be wielded like a club, but they could be damaged in the process.[2] They required smokepowder to use.[4]

History[edit | edit source]

On the world of Toril, the blunderbuss originated on the island nation of Lantan,[1][8][9] during the Time of Troubles, after the deity Gond revealed to his followers how to make reasonably safe and accurate firearms that utilized smokepowder.[1] From 1358 DR onwards, the Lantanna priests of Gond (mainly the specialty priests) would work to spread the use of firearms, shipping them to Western ports.[2][10]

When the blunderbuss and other arquebuses first showed up off of Lantan they were considered mere curious, but after five or so years they became increasingly common.[1] Their increasing prevalence on Toril was due in part to spelljammers bringing in arquebuses from elsewhere.[11][12][13] With one source being the Smiths' Coster trading company, who conducted business with the Lantanna, Waterdhavians, and elsewhere.[13]

By 1370 DR, one could purchase arquebuses among other firearms from The Brigadier, a giff gunsmith, in Skullport.[4]

Price[edit | edit source]

In the first three years that it was available for purchase outside of Lantan, a blunderbuss cost roughly 5,000 gold pieces. Through the third to fifth year, as the weapon became more common, the cost lowered to 1,000 gold pieces. Following the fifth year, a blunderbuss on Toril consistently cost around 500 gold pieces.[1]

Appendix[edit | edit source]

Background[edit | edit source]

The name blunderbuss is derived from a Dutch word and translates literally to "thundergun."[7]

External Links[edit | edit source]

Smallwikipedialogo.png Blunderbuss article at Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia.

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood (1990). Forgotten Realms Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 12. ISBN 0-8803-8828-5.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood (1990). Forgotten Realms Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 13. ISBN 0-8803-8828-5.
  3. Ed Greenwood (February 1983). “A Second Volley: Taking another shot at firearms, AD&D style”. In Kim Mohan ed. Dragon #70 (TSR, Inc.), p. 33.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 Joseph C. Wolf (1999). Skullport. (TSR, Inc), p. 61. ISBN 0-7869-1348-7.
  5. Michael Shortt (July 2004). “The Way of the Gun”. In Matthew Sernett ed. Dragon #321 (Paizo Publishing), p. 34.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 Ed Greenwood (February 1983). “A Second Volley: Taking another shot at firearms, AD&D style”. In Kim Mohan ed. Dragon #70 (TSR, Inc.), p. 34.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Michael Shortt (July 2004). “The Way of the Gun”. In Matthew Sernett ed. Dragon #321 (Paizo Publishing), p. 31.
  8. Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 109. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  9. Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), Running the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 50. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  10. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 62. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  11. Curtis Scott (1992). The Complete Spacefarer's Handbook. Edited by Barbara G. Young. (TSR, Inc.), p. 12. ISBN 1-56076-347-7.
  12. Jeff Grubb (August 1989). “Lorebook of the Void”. Spelljammer: AD&D Adventures in Space (TSR, Inc.), p. 93. ISBN 0-88038-762-9.
  13. 13.0 13.1 Roger E. Moore (August 1996). “Sorcerous Six-Shooters”. In Pierce Watters ed. Dragon #232 (TSR, Inc.), p. 37.
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