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Carp hengeyokai (pronounced: /hɛngɛjkhen-geh-yo-kigh[7]) or simply carps were a carp-based subrace of the hengeyokai, a race of intelligent natural shapechanging animals able to adopt carp, human, and hybrid forms. They shared all the common traits and habits of hengeyokai, plus those discussed below.[5][1][3][8]

DescriptionEdit

In human form, a hengeyokai had some feature reminiscent of their animal form.[5][1][3][8] Carps might have short statures, large eyes, and pale skin.[9]

AbilitiesEdit

Compared to humans and the average hengeyokai, carps were slightly wiser but less strong,[5][1] or they were more agile.[3] They were adept in endurance skills.[6]

In their animal form, carps were of course excellent swimmers, but they could not swim like fish in their bipedal forms.[5][1] Nevertheless, even swimming like humanoids in their hybrid forms, they were very good swimmers, faster than in their smaller animal forms.[3] They had good skill in swimming generally and could breathe underwater.[6] However, they were significantly slower walking on land than humans.[3][6]

PersonalityEdit

On the whole, carps were good-hearted.[5][1][3][8]

SocietyEdit

They were known to hibernate in the winter.[9]

Carps, along with cranes, dogs, hares, and monkeys, were more likely to become monks than other hengeyokai.[6]

Known CommunitiesEdit

The "lake folk" of Nam Tso in Tabot in the mid–14th century DR were a school of kindly carps.[9][10] As they'd rescued some fishermen and a little girl from the lake, they'd earned the respect and aid of the local people in Bidnop So by 1357 DR. Here, they traded rice and opals from the lake bed for things they couldn't manufacture.[9]

Notable Carp HengeyokaiEdit

AppendixEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 Rick Swan (July 1990). Monstrous Compendium Kara-Tur Appendix. (TSR, Inc.), p. Hengeyokai. ISBN 0-88038-851-X.
  2. Tim Eagon (October 2011). “Ecology of the Hengeyokai”. In Steve Winter ed. Dragon #404 (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 5–8.
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 James Wyatt (October 2001). Oriental Adventures (3rd edition). (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 10–11, 12, 168. ISBN 0-7869-2015-7.
  4. James Wyatt (April 2004). “Oriental Adventures Update: Eastern Flavor”. In Matthew Sernett ed. Dragon #318 (Paizo Publishing, LLC), p. 34.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 Gary Gygax, David Cook, and François Marcela-Froideval (1985). Oriental Adventures. (TSR, Inc), pp. 11, 12–13. ISBN 0-8803-8099-3.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8 Tim Eagon (October 2011). “Ecology of the Hengeyokai”. In Steve Winter ed. Dragon #404 (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 7, 8.
  7. James Wyatt (October 2001). Oriental Adventures (3rd edition). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 250. ISBN 0-7869-2015-7.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 Tim Eagon (October 2011). “Ecology of the Hengeyokai”. In Steve Winter ed. Dragon #404 (Wizards of the Coast), p. 2.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume I). (TSR, Inc), pp. 72, 76. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  10. Tim Eagon (October 2011). “Ecology of the Hengeyokai”. In Steve Winter ed. Dragon #404 (Wizards of the Coast), p. 3.
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