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A celestial creature was a creature living on one of the Upper Planes that bore a resemblance to a similar creature on the Material Plane.[1] Often mistaken for half-celestials, these creatures were not nearly so powerful and did not share a bloodline with any of the true celestials.[1] Many celestial creatures were to celestials as animals were to humans of the Material Plane.[2]

DescriptionEdit

Celestial creatures appeared much like their counterparts on the Prime, except that they often had visible signs of the holy realms where they dwelt, often in the form of gold, silver, or platinum coloration.[1] For example, in Arcadia, foxes were gold, sheep were silver, and hares were copper,[3] while stags in the divine realm of Labelas Enoreth wore coats of white.[4] They were generally more attractive and noble of appearance than their non-celestial cousins.[1]

AbilitiesEdit

Outside their majestic appearances, celestial creatures were in most ways similar to the prime creatures that they resembled, but there were a few significant differences. All celestial creatures were sentient with at least minimal intelligence. A celestial mouse would be more intelligent than any mouse native to Toril.[1]

All celestial creatures had the ability to see in the dark and were resistant to harm from acid, cold, electricity, spells, and often to attacks from mundane weapons.[1]

An attack from a celestial creature had the supernatural power to cause more harm to creatures that were evil.[1]

PersonalityEdit

All celestial creatures were good like the planes on which they dwelt.[1]

EcologyEdit

There were a plethora of creatures living on all of the Upper Planes that were similar to ones from Toril yet had adapted to those good worlds. For example, celestial treants were known to inhabit the World Tree.[5] Celestial animals roamed Bytopia in great numbers; in Garl Glittergold's Golden Hills, they were golden-furred and golden-plumed.[6] Elysium, too, had great numbers of celestial animals with golden skin and silver eyes.[7] Arborea had many celestial creatures.[8] Within it, the realm of Arvandor was full of celestial elves. Celestial eagles flew the skies of Aerdrie Faenya's realm of Aerie. Celestial dolphins swam Deep Sashelas' Sparkling Sea, and a host of celestial animals inhabited the woods of Fenmarel Mestarine.[9] Likewise, celestial dragons were native to the Dragon Eyrie,[10]

HistoryEdit

Most celestial creatures were natural inhabitants of their planes and always had been; however, in some cases, a celestial creature had once existent in a past life on the Material Plane. This was especially true in the House of Nature, where that plane's humanoid petitioners slowly took on animalistic traits until they at last fully morphed into celestial animals.[11] Some sages claimed that the same was true for the celestial animals living in the Beastlands.[12]

Notable Celestial CreaturesEdit

Over the centuries, both divine and arcane spellcasters had learned the power to summon many varieties of celestial creatures from their home planes for temporary aid. Common among these were celestial badgers, bears, bison, dogs, dolphins, eagles and giant eagles, elephants, giant bees, giant beetles, griffons and hippogriffs, lions, monkeys, owls and giant owls, rocs, sea cats, triceratops, and whales.[13] In the case of divine magic, these creatures were most often servants of the deific power worshiped by the summoning cleric.[14][15]

The spell vipergout summoned celestial vipers.[16] The elven high magic spell celestial army could be used to summon a single celestial lammasu.[17] The pegasus helm of Kloeth Ironstar was a magical helmet that could summon a celestial pegasus.[18]

The Keepers were a group of celestial halflings in service to Arvoreen.[19]

Celestial chargers were celestial unicorns[20] who inhabited Mielikki's Grove of the Unicorns.[21]

AppendixEdit

See AlsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 Skip Williams, Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook (July 2003). Monster Manual 3.5. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 31–32. ISBN 0-7869-2893-X.
  2. Jeff Grubb, Bruce R. Cordell, David Noonan (September 2001). Manual of the Planes 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 88. ISBN 0-7869-1850-8.
  3. Jeff Grubb (July 1987). Manual of the Planes 1st edition. (TSR), p. 86. ISBN 0880383992.
  4. Sean K. Reynolds (2002-05-04). Deity Do's and Don'ts (Zipped PDF). Wizards of the Coast. p. 12. Archived from the original on 2016-11-01. Retrieved on 2018-09-08.
  5. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 140. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  6. Jeff Grubb, Bruce R. Cordell, David Noonan (September 2001). Manual of the Planes 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 137–138. ISBN 0-7869-1850-8.
  7. Jeff Grubb, Bruce R. Cordell, David Noonan (September 2001). Manual of the Planes 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 139. ISBN 0-7869-1850-8.
  8. Jeff Grubb, Bruce R. Cordell, David Noonan (September 2001). Manual of the Planes 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 145. ISBN 0-7869-1850-8.
  9. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 143–144. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  10. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 150. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  11. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 158. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  12. Jeff Grubb, Bruce R. Cordell, David Noonan (September 2001). Manual of the Planes 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 142. ISBN 0-7869-1850-8.
  13. Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams (July 2003). Player's Handbook 3.5 edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 285–288. ISBN 0-7869-2886-7.
  14. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 259. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  15. Sean K. Reynolds (2002-05-04). Deity Do's and Don'ts (Zipped PDF). Wizards of the Coast. p. 8. Archived from the original on 2016-11-01. Retrieved on 2018-09-08.
  16. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 117. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  17. Mark Middleton et al (November 1996). Wizard's Spell Compendium Volume One. (TSR, Inc), p. 127. ISBN 978-0786904365.
  18. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 124. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  19. Sean K. Reynolds (2002-05-04). Deity Do's and Don'ts (Zipped PDF). Wizards of the Coast. p. 10. Archived from the original on 2016-11-01. Retrieved on 2018-09-08.
  20. Skip Williams, Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook (July 2003). Monster Manual 3.5. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 250. ISBN 0-7869-2893-X.
  21. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 159. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
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