FANDOM



Chessenta was a confederation of city-states bound by common culture and mutual defense, but for most of its history wasn’t truly a unified nation and the Chessentan cities were often at war with one another. Chessenta was one of the so-called Old Empires of Faerûn.[1][11]

CultureEdit

The Chessentans were a passionate people, always living to the fullest and never doing things half-way. Seen by outsiders as a drunken and riotous people, Chessentans had a well-earned reputation as fierce warriors and cunning tacticians. While they appreciated the fine arts and theatre, the culture of the Chessentans revolved around war and war heroes.[1][6] This dedication to war suits the Chessentans well, for their nation has prospered through the conflicts between their rival cities. The title of War Hero was one of the greatest honors a person could earn, and usually any particular battle only had one person worthy of such a title.[12]

Few nations in all Faerûn were as erudite in philosophy, astronomy, poetry, and history as Chessenta. Theatres and libraries were commonplace, and even in smaller cities such poetry and philosopy were practiced in public squares. Chessentans also loved sports and their athletic competitions were popular events, particularly wrestling, and almost every citizen had some skill at fighting. [6] Chessenta’s sizable middle class controlled the country’s economy, with a government that encouraged prosperity for all, so tax revenues were high. [12]

Despite such progressiveness, Chessentans practiced slavery, [12] and most of their slaves were elves, [6] although this practice was less widespread than in the nations of the Old Empires, and a slave-owner could grant a slave freedom at any time.[12] In the 15th century DR, Chessentans also developed a deep-seated mistrust of all things arcane, because of their enmity with High Imaskar.[3]

Although all Chessentans had these traits in common, each city also boasted its own customs and heroes, worshiped its own gladiatorial champions, and competed with the other cities with great zeal. [11]

HistoryEdit

Chessenta was founded in -1771 DR as an autonomous province of the first Untheric empire. It was named after their first Grand Viceroy, Iphram Chess. His first official proclamation was the cleansing of all indigenous species, notably the Turami peoples of the Akana and the Batoi halflings along the Adder River.[6] Over the next several centuries, Gilgeam the Tyran sent the Chessentan legions in decisive campaigns against eastern Jhaamdath and the fey of the Methwood.[13]

In 929 DR the city states of Chessenta, led by the war hero Tchazzar, drove the armies of Unther to the Riders to the Sky mountains, freeing Chessenta from Untheric rule.[13] During Tchazzar's brief Chessentan Empire, the city of Cimbar was the capital of Chessenta.[1][12] In 1018 DR, Tchazzar disappeared while fighting sahuagin and the people of Chessenta believed he had ascended to godhood. After Tchazzar's disappearance, the kingdom slowly broke apart into squabbling city states, around 1117 DR.[13][10] Tchazzar returned in 1373 DR to reestablish his kingdom but disappeared again following the chaos of the Spellplague in 1385 DR.[13]

In the decades after the Spellplague the war hero Ishual Karanok rose to rule Chessenta. Under his guidance, Chessenta was unified as a single nation again. During the rule of the Karanok dinasty, during the 15th century DR, the capital of Chessenta was the city of Luthcheq In 1479 DR, his descendand, Shala Karanok, was the ruler of Chessenta[2] when Tchazzar was rescued from the Shadowfell by the Brotherhood of the Griffon, as part of the plans of the dragon player's of Brimstone's xorvintaal, and became ruler of Chessenta once again.[14]

Under Tchazzar's guidance, Chessenta was finally able to conquer Threskel, making it a vassal state. However, Tchazzar slowly descended to madness and tried to destroy Luthcheq, and was eventually defeated by the Shala's loyalists, the Brotherhood of the Griffon, the army of Akanûl and a group of knights from Tymanther at the Battle of Luthcheq. After the battle, Shala was reinstated as the war hero.[15]

Following the chaos of the Second Sundering, Chessenta once again broke apart into squabbling city states.[11]

ReligionEdit

After the Spellplague, Amaunator gained many followers who saw him as the ancient Untherian god Hokatep returned to Faerûn. As Chessenta was a martial society, Tempus had many followers. Oghma had a large temple in Erebos and, since Kelemvor had almost no presence in the region, the temple of Waukeen assumed responsibility for tending to the dead.[16]

In addition to the common Faerûnian religions there were several regional cults. The Cult of Tchazzar always had a large membership in Chessenta and with Tchazzar's return the cult was been reinvigorated and was building a huge temple in Luthcheq in 1479 DR.[14] The Cult of Entropy worshiped the primordial Entropy and a cult worshiped the archfey Sebakar, the Lord of Crocodiles.[16]

Major geographical featuresEdit

LakesEdit

Bay of Chessenta
With the drop in the water level of the Sea of Fallen Stars this shallow bay all but dried up.
Adder Swamp
When the Bay of Chessenta dried up the swamp all but disappeared.

MountainsEdit

Riders to the Sky
A range of hills and mountains that was the domain of trolls and duergar.[12]

OtherEdit

Maw of the God Swallower
This area of plagueland in south-central Chessenta continues to grow, swallowing everything in its path. In its center the primordial Entropy hangs over the landscape.[16]

Notable locationsEdit

Cities and TownsEdit

Akanax
This large city was in essence a large military camp.[12] Now in ruins.[citation needed]
Cimbar (formerly)
Now in ruins, this was the largest city and the spiritual capital of Chessenta in the pre-spellplague era.[12]
Erebos
Large city in the northwest. A temple of Tiamat stood near the sea.[16]
Heptios
A former city-state of 9,000 now under the dominion of Chessenta.[16]
Luthcheq
The City of Madness was ruled by Tchazzar. It was formerly ruled by the Karanok family, all of whom were members of the Cult of Entropy.[12] As such, magic was shunned in the city.[9]
Mordulkin
A city on the eastern side of the Bay of Chessenta. Ruled for a long time by the Jedea family and a haven for wizards.[17]
Pandrik
Fortress city of 6,500 souls situated near the Adder Swap. It had a precarious treaty with Luthcheq.[16]
Soolabax
A large town near the border with Threskel.[18]
Toreus
Grew significantly after the Spellplague to become Chessenta's third largest city with a population of 17,000.[16]
Tulach
Situation just east of the Maerwatch. Despite its small size (population of 1,100), Tulach had it's own monarch.[16]

Navy and seafaringEdit

Chessentan vessels were named after sea creatures or sea-related myths.[19]

AppendixEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 182. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 100. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Rob Heinsoo, Logan Bonner, Robert J. Schwalb (September 2008). Forgotten Realms Player's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 86. ISBN 978-0-7869-4929-8.
  4. Brian R. James (May 2010). “Backdrop: Chessenta”. In Chris Youngs ed. Dungeon #178 (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 69–70.
  5. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 85. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 Brian R. James (May 2010). “Backdrop: Chessenta”. In Chris Youngs ed. Dungeon #178 (Wizards of the Coast), p. 69.
  7. Brian R. James (May 2010). “Backdrop: Chessenta”. In Chris Youngs ed. Dungeon #178 (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 74–75.
  8. Steven E. Schend (1999). Sea of Fallen Stars. (TSR, Inc), p. 6. ISBN 0-7869-1393-2.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 184. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Scott Bennie (1990). Old Empires. (TSR, Inc), pp. 5–6. ISBN 0-8803-8821-8.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 11. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 12.5 12.6 12.7 12.8 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 183. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 Brian R. James (May 2010). “Backdrop: Chessenta”. In Chris Youngs ed. Dungeon #178 (Wizards of the Coast), p. 70.
  14. 14.0 14.1 Richard Lee Byers (2010). Whisper of Venom. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 0786955619.
  15. Richard Lee Byers (June 7th, 2011). The Spectral Blaze. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 0786957980.
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 16.3 16.4 16.5 16.6 16.7 Brian R. James (May 2010). “Backdrop: Chessenta”. In Chris Youngs ed. Dungeon #178 (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 68–77.
  17. Scott Bennie (1990). Old Empires. (TSR, Inc), p. 55. ISBN 0-8803-8821-8.
  18. Richard Lee Byers (May 2010). The Captive Flame. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 0786953969.
  19. Steven E. Schend (1999). Sea of Fallen Stars. (TSR, Inc), p. 15. ISBN 0-7869-1393-2.
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.