Forgotten Realms Wiki
Advertisement
Forgotten Realms Wiki

The Church of Cyric was the organization of fanatics and zealots dedicated to the worship and expanded influence of Cyric,[3] the once-mortal man that ascended to godhood in the mid–14th century DR.[6] The deity known "the One and All" to his followers became the god of murder, intrigue, strife, and others,[6] before losing the domain of tyranny for that of madness,[3][7] and finally being left with only trickery and lies.[8]

It depends on me, of course. Everything does.
Who shall live. Who shall die. What is, what shall be...
Let them scorn me if they dare. I am the One, the All, the Face Behind the Mask.
I am Everything.
— Cyric to his future chosen Malik el Sami, on the Night of Despair.[9]

Organization[]

Cyric's holy symbol painted over the floor of a siezed temple of Bhaal in the Forest of Wyrms.

The "church" was a vast and far-reaching organization that comprised individual cell-like cults within many major cities across Faerûn. Each cell kept the location and activities of their group secret to others, often leading to conflicts between individual cells.[3]

Each Cyricist temple was led by the "most powerful" local priest or blackguard, each of whom subsequently established a hierarchy as they saw fit. Rivals often vied for power, often leading to regular and disruptive changes in leadership and overt feelings of paranoia among these leaders.[3] There was no single head of the Cyricist religion, though several influential head priests believed themselves destined for such glory.[4]

Titles[]

Cyric's church had only a select few true priests, individuals that referred to one another as "the Sworn". Titles within the clergy included Dark Master, Hand of Cyric, Watchful Skull, and Dread Death.[6]

Activities[]

A Dark Sun has risen o'er this court...
— Faerûnian saying alluding to inner turmoil.[10]

In brief terms, the church's collective aim was to accumulate more power for themselves and Cyric, and destroy any groups or individuals that they perceived as rivals or threats.[3] Agents of the faith were directed to infiltrate political bodies and power circles in cities across the Realms, especially those led by tyrants and despots, in order to spread mistrust and internal conflict within. To grow and foster devotion to Cyric's dogma, the priests took these actions without going so far as to plunge each kingdom or empire into outright chaos, lest some other deity reap the benefits of their work.[6][4]

In practice, however, many priests of Cyric merely spent their time vying for greater power within the church and plotting against the leaders of rival cells. This discord within the church was intentional and not a malfunction of its operations however, as Cyric himself offered conflicting directives and often self-destructive orders to his own followers.[6][4]

Rituals[]

Ritual sacrifices and blood offerings were always required when giving prayer to Cyric.[6] Priests prayed for their spells during the night hours after the moon had risen.[4]

Among the known ceremonies of the Cyricist faith were the Ritual of Honest Pain, which allowed the recipient to better lie without detection; the Ritual of Black Charms, which gave someone the daily power to easily influence the opinions of others; and the Ritual of the Dark Flames, which empowered his faithful with the ability to conture black flames of negative energy.[11]

Celebrations[]

The Church of Cyric celebrated few holy days throughout the Calendar of Harptos.[6] An eclipse was always a momentous occasion, celebrated with feasts, prayer, and the ritualistic murder of prominent devotee of Lathander.[4]

For most of the 1360s DR, the day of Marpenoth 30 was one of celebration for the Cyricist clergy. This day commemorated the purge of Banites from Cyric's most holy city. After the Fall of Zhentil Keep in 1368 DR, however, the celebrations were immediately ended and any records of the holiday were stricken from church records.[6]

In a spiteful twist of irony, the day of Cyric's ascension to godhood was not revered as a holy day for the church as it was also the day when Cyric's mortal nemesis Midnight became the new goddess of magic.[6]

A "Day of the Dark Sun" was announced by any local priest when their cell acquired a subject worthy enough to sacrifice to their god.[6][4]

Tactics[]

To achieve their goals of widespread distrust and conflict, Cyricists resorted to nearly any tactic available to them, including spying, kidnapping, infiltration of other churches, economic disruption, and of course murder. In some cases, temple leaders brainwashed others to enlist them for missions that they knew would end with the convert's death.[3]

Individual agents preferred to carry out operations alone or in small groups, as there was less chance of their actions attracting unwanted notice. These small cells only acted in coordination with one another when a strong-willed leader arose within their ranks to take control and achieve greater objectives.[12]

Base of Operations[]

Zhentil Keep existed as the only true central seat of power for the church of Cyric following his ascension, lasting about a decade until the city's fall in 1368 DR.[6]

Temples[]

Cyricist places of worship varied in formation and appearance, springing up in abandoned buildings, isolated caves, dungeons, city sewer systems, and most notably, abandoned temples that once served the Dead Three. The one unifying theme was the inclusion of a sacrificial altar within.[4] Notable Cyricist temples included:

Possessions[]

A priest of Cyric in the vestments of the clergy.

Symbology[]

The holy symbol of the faith was a jawless skull set before a purple of black sunburst. Individual temples modified the symbol as they saw fit, with additions such as a sword added beneath the skull, or flames within its eyesockets.[3][8]

Dress[]

Cyric's priests dressed in purple or black robes lined with silver, along with silver bracers or bracelets bearing his holy symbol,[6][4] symbolizing their enslavement to the One True God.[22] When out in the field, they wore inconspicuous apparel that allowed them to easily act without drawing unwanted attention. If they chose to inspire terror rather than appear incognito, the priests preferred spiked black armor with a helm depicting some monstrous visage.[6][4]

Magic Items[]

The Cyrinishad was among the most holy artifacts to the church of Cyric. Created by the Dark Sun himself, the book forcibly converted to his faith anyone that read its words or heard them aloud.[4]

According to legend, there were seven black iron keys that were needed to free Cyric from his imprisonment within the Supreme Throne. These keys were considered extremely valuable, each fetching upwards of 50,000 gp from the right purchaser.[23]

Dogma[]

Beliefs[]

Cyric was viewed by his devotees as the only true divine sovereign in all of Faerûnian cosmology,[3] one that had been a god throghout the entierty of existence (despite acknowledement of his brief life as a mortal).[6][4] They believed that his holy word— the One True Way—must be spread across all the Realms by any means necssary. Authority figures were only to be obeyed so long as they maintained order, otherwise should slain in Cyric's name. Anyone that opposed the One True Way, especially the faithful of any other deities, were to be exterminated and strife sown amidst the circumstances of their deaths. Rather than cause outright bedlam, Cyricist clergy sought to make examples of the One's enemies, to others fearful of his inevitable control over their existence.[6][24]

Attitude[]

Like Cyric himself,[25] the followers of the One True Way regularly expressed extreme narcissism, misogyny, misanthropy towards the world around them. They were often prone to paranoid[26][note 1] and antisocial behavior, especially when trapped in pointless "competition" with one another.[27] They spoke of Cyric in absurd exagerrations[28] and referred to other gods with disparaging terms, saving the worst vitriol for his enemies Oghma ("the Thief"), Mystra ("the Harlot")[1] and Kelemvor ("the Usurper").[29]

Orders[]

The anarchic nature of Cyric's church led to the formation of numerous splinter organizations and factions. Among these were:[3]

Clerical Orders[]

Military Orders[]

Assassin Guilds[]

Classes[]

Specialty priests of Cyric were known as strifeleaders.[6] They were Cyric's foremost agents that extended his will into the power structures that existed across the Realms, and into the lives of their subjects.[24]

Relationships[]

The church of Cyric was loathed and in some cases forbidden across many lands. As befitting their nature, they had no true allies.[4] The church did occasionally partner itself with other malevolent organizations or with some of the more-monstrous races of the Realms, so long as their goals aligned with that of Cyric's will. Throughout the years, Cyricist clergy members have worked alongside the Cult of the Dragon as well as the Order of the Long Death.[3]

For a time, the church of Cyric was wholly intertwined with the enigmatic organization known as the Zhentarim. After the mortal Cyric rose to godhood and took over the portfolio of Bane, many Bane-worshipping Zhents immediately turned to their new god, at least for a time.[3] Other Zhentarim agents merely paid lip service to Cyric while secretly continuing veneration Bane, or his divine son Iyachtu Xvim.[38][39]

After return of the god Bane to the Faerûnian pantheon, the dynamic between the Cyricist faith and the Zhentarim reversed, and members of the Black Network became counted among the church's most hated enemies.[3]

History[]

Birth and Growth[]

As the mortal yet always-infinite Cyric gloriously ascended to godhood at the culmination of the Avatar Crisis in the Year of Shadows, 1358 DR, his church was formed in short order. It grew with exceptional speed, hastened by the deaths of the Dead Three—that is Bane, Bhaal, and Myrkul—that very year. Many disaffected faithful of evil intent turned to Cyric after the deaths of their respective patron deities, and some that did not were still granted divine magic by him,[6] for reasons known only to his brilliance.[14]

The Dark Sun's faith flourished in the formerly Banite city of Zhentil Keep,[14] and within no time at all Cyric ascended as one of the three great evil gods of the Realms' cosmology.[6] The church continued for well over the following decade, spreading as far away as the Sword Coast,[40] Calimshan,[1] and even Thay.[41] Even the insular Bedine people of the Anauroch were illuminated by Cyric's glory, venerating his aspect N'asr.[42]

Despite the great many converts, some obstinate lackeys of Bane still clung to heretical faith within Zhentil Keep. Frustrated with their lack of vision, Cyric declared those infidels in his most holy city must be punished.[14] Cyric's inquisitors initiated the Banedeath on Marpenoth 30 in the Year of Maidens, 1361 DR, purging nearly all Banite worship from Zhentil Keep and driving any remnants underground.[6][14] As was their right, the church took wholesale control of the city and claimed it in his name.[43] This bloody coup inspired a similar (albeit less-famous) inquisition in Amn the following year.[44]

Crisis[]

As The One and All gloriously acquired the domain of madness in the Year of the Banner, 1368 DR, he initiated another inquisition against the faithful of Bane known as the Second Banedeath. He transformed the followers of rival deities into massive Gondar machines of destruction and laid waste to the Zhent-controlled fortress of Darkhold in the Western Heartlands, the community of Teshwave in the Dalelands, and the Citadel of the Raven and the city Yûlash in the Moonsea region.[45][46]

That same year, The One directed a monstrous army of the Moonsea North—including frost giants, gnolls and other beastmen—to descend upon the unworthy of Zhentil Keep and create a tempestuous swell of prayer in his honor as doom approached.[47]

Finally, he commissioned the writing of the most holy tome The Cyrinishad by a Zhent scribe, after several failed attempts that did not capture the real essence of the Dark Sun.[47] As Cyric prepared to have his opus read before the people of the city, the treacherous former Banite Fzoul Chembryl read aloud from a blasphemous work of fiction, The True Life of Cyric. This calamitous mistake led to numerous tragedies for the city, preventing them from hearing Cyric's glory and attempting to lay out his intricate plan that was too much for them to comprehend.[47] Ultimately, Zhentil Keep was destroyed[48] an event that came to be known to the blasphemous as the Day of Cyric's Reckoning.[49]

Despite these trifling setbacks, Cyric's truly loyal infiltrated towns and cities all across the Realms and inserted themselves into positions of power by the Year of the Tankard, 1370 DR. Vital holdings included Llorkh in the Savage Frontier[50] and the Host Tower of the Arcane in Luskan.[51]

Languor[]

After Cyric finally murdered Mystra in the Year of Blue Fire, 1385 DR,[52][53] he was for some reason imprisoned within the Supreme Throne in Pandemonium for one thousand years.[54] This terrible injustice led to an unfortunate decline in his influence across the Realms.[21]

As of the late 15th century, all that remained of the One True Faith beyond the Lands of Intrigue were scattered and frantic cults, determined to endure throughout the years until his mighty return.[5] While the other lands were not fortunate enough to receive his blessing, Cyric's faithful strifeleaders continued his righteous work wherever possible.[54] Some of these loyal agents returned to roles within the reformed Zhentarim, just as they did when the glory of the Dark Sun was at its apex.[21]

The One's very own chosen, and perhaps most loyal servant, managed to witness a manifestation of the Dark Sun during the events of the Second Sundering in the Year of the Nether Mountain Scrolls, 1486 DR. The Dark Sun tasked him with the divine mission to assassinate the chosen of the lesser gods Tyr and Sune, so that he could claim control over Mystra's cherished Weave instead of the unworthy Shar.[55]

Members[]

Blackwill Haarken Akhmelere, leader of the Twin Towers of the Eternal Eclipse.

Bow down before the supreme power of Cyric, and yield to him the blood of all who do not believe in his supreme power.
— The charge given to Cyricist priests.[6]

The faith attracted some of the worst and most power-hungry of Faerûnian society: unabashed liars, murderers, spies, and shameless traitors to home and country. They were considered among the least loyal people of the Realms, even among their fellow faithful.[6][3] To coincide with the church's intrinsic lack of order, the faith welcomed any and all that chose to venerate Cyric. Converts to the faith were suject to horrific rituals and in some cases torture, meant to prove their devotion to their mad god.[3]

Notable Cyricists[]

Regions[]

Heartlands[]

For the decade after its formation, faith of Cyric was strongest in the Moonsea especially within Zhentil Keep.[60] The resurrection of Bane in 1370 DR led to the religion being outlawed within the Keep,[61] and falling out favor with the Moonsea people, as was the case in Mulmaster.[62]

The mysterious rift known as the Darkwatch north of the Glaemril river was considered a place of unholy power by Cyric's priests.[63]

Sword Coast[]

A monument to Cyric's eternal glory was constructed atop one of the Boareskyr Bridge, depicting his triumphant defeat of the madman Bhaal.[64][65][40]

Mount Waterdeep was a sacred site to the worshipers of Cyric as this was the location of his apotheosis. As such, many of Cyric's more fanatical followers would make regular pilgrimages to the city of Waterdeep.[66]

Lands of Intrigue[]

Worship of Cyric became widespread throughout much of the Lands of Intrigue, during the decade that followed Cyric's ascension. Amnian followers of the Dead Three quickly aligned themsleves with the Dark Sun, and the faith gained further prominence as the Shadow Thieves aligned themselves with his tenets.[44] Throughout the corse of a century the faith became intertwined with Amnian values such as determinism and self-sufficiency, as evidenced by its representation with the Pommarch on the Council of Five.[5]

The faith gained popularity in Tethyr during the Tethyrian Interregnum, but became wholly unwelcome after the end of the Reclamation Wars in 1368 DR.[67] It remained strong within the nation of Muranndin throughout the 15th century DR.[21]

Appendix[]

Notes[]

  1. Referring to initial lines spoken by the character Mulahey.

Appearances[]

Novels
Prince of LiesCrucible: The Trial of Cyric the Mad
Video Games
Baldur's Gate series (Baldur's Gate, Baldur's Gate: Siege of Dragonspear)

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Troy Denning (February 1998). Crucible: The Trial of Cyric the Mad. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 4. ISBN 0-7869-0724-X.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 239–240. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 3.15 3.16 3.17 Jason Carl, Sean K. Reynolds (October 2001). Lords of Darkness. Edited by Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 6–8. ISBN 07-8691-989-2.
  4. 4.00 4.01 4.02 4.03 4.04 4.05 4.06 4.07 4.08 4.09 4.10 4.11 4.12 4.13 4.14 4.15 Eric L. Boyd, Erik Mona (May 2002). Faiths and Pantheons. Edited by Gwendolyn F.M. Kestrel, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 20–21. ISBN 0-7869-2759-3.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Edited by Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 92. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  6. 6.00 6.01 6.02 6.03 6.04 6.05 6.06 6.07 6.08 6.09 6.10 6.11 6.12 6.13 6.14 6.15 6.16 6.17 6.18 6.19 6.20 6.21 Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc.), pp. 52–53. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  7. Troy Denning (February 1998). Crucible: The Trial of Cyric the Mad. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 13. ISBN 0-7869-0724-X.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Steve Kenson, et al. (November 2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. Edited by Kim Mohan. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 21. ISBN 978-0-7869-6580-9.
  9. Troy Denning (February 1998). Crucible: The Trial of Cyric the Mad. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 1–2. ISBN 0-7869-0724-X.
  10. Steve Kenson, et al. (November 2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. Edited by Kim Mohan. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 27–28. ISBN 978-0-7869-6580-9.
  11. Jason Carl, Sean K. Reynolds (October 2001). Lords of Darkness. Edited by Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 11. ISBN 07-8691-989-2.
  12. Jason Carl, Sean K. Reynolds (October 2001). Lords of Darkness. Edited by Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 9. ISBN 07-8691-989-2.
  13. 13.0 13.1 John Terra (January 1995). “Reference Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 12. ISBN 978-0786900923.
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.5 Kevin Melka, John Terra (March 1995). “Campaign Book”. In Julia Martin ed. Ruins of Zhentil Keep (TSR, Inc.), p. 21. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  15. John Terra (January 1995). “Reference Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 22. ISBN 978-0786900923.
  16. Richard Baker, Bruce R. Cordell, David Noonan, Matthew Sernett, James Wyatt (March 2007). Cormyr: The Tearing of the Weave. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 84. ISBN 978-0-7869-4119-3.
  17. Steven E. Schend (August 1997). “Book Two: Amn”. In Roger E. Moore ed. Lands of Intrigue (TSR, Inc.), p. 27. ISBN 0-7869-0697-9.
  18. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Edited by Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 93. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  19. Steven E. Schend (August 1997). “Book Two: Amn”. In Roger E. Moore ed. Lands of Intrigue (TSR, Inc.), p. 23. ISBN 0-7869-0697-9.
  20. Steven E. Schend (August 1997). “Book Two: Amn”. In Roger E. Moore ed. Lands of Intrigue (TSR, Inc.), p. 59. ISBN 0-7869-0697-9.
  21. 21.0 21.1 21.2 21.3 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Edited by Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 282. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  22. James Lowder (August 1993). Prince of Lies. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 277. ISBN 1-56076-626-3.
  23. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Edited by Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 45. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  24. 24.0 24.1 Eric L. Boyd, Erik Mona (May 2002). Faiths and Pantheons. Edited by Gwendolyn F.M. Kestrel, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 204. ISBN 0-7869-2759-3.
  25. Troy Denning (February 1998). Crucible: The Trial of Cyric the Mad. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 1. ISBN 0-7869-0724-X.
  26. 26.0 26.1 BioWare (December 1998). Designed by James Ohlen. Baldur's Gate. Black Isle Studios.
  27. Jason Carl, Sean K. Reynolds (October 2001). Lords of Darkness. Edited by Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 17. ISBN 07-8691-989-2.
  28. Troy Denning (February 1998). Crucible: The Trial of Cyric the Mad. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 2. ISBN 0-7869-0724-X.
  29. Troy Denning (February 1998). Crucible: The Trial of Cyric the Mad. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 373. ISBN 0-7869-0724-X.
  30. Ed Greenwood (2001-04-04). Part #15: Serving the Dark Sun. Elminster Speaks. Wizards of the Coast. Archived from the original on 2016-11-01. Retrieved on 2016-10-28.
  31. Ed Greenwood (2001-04-04). Part #16: The Dark Blessed. Elminster Speaks. Wizards of the Coast. Archived from the original on 2016-11-01. Retrieved on 2017-02-02.
  32. John Terra (February 1996). Warriors and Priests of the Realms. Edited by Steven E. Schend. (TSR, Inc), p. 73. ISBN 0-7869-0368-6.
  33. John Terra (February 1996). Warriors and Priests of the Realms. Edited by Steven E. Schend. (TSR, Inc), p. 74. ISBN 0-7869-0368-6.
  34. Troy Denning (February 1998). Crucible: The Trial of Cyric the Mad. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 9. ISBN 0-7869-0724-X.
  35. John Terra (January 1995). “Reference Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 14. ISBN 978-0786900923.
  36. James Wyatt and Rob Heinsoo (February 2001). Monster Compendium: Monsters of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 84. ISBN 0-7869-1832-2.
  37. Anthony Pryor (June 1995). “Monstrous Compendium”. In Michele Carter, Doug Stewart eds. Spellbound (TSR, Inc.), p. 15. ISBN 978-0786901395.
  38. Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 56. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  39. Brian R. James, Ed Greenwood (September 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. Edited by Kim Mohan, Penny Williams. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 149. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  40. 40.0 40.1 Beamdog (March 2016). Designed by Philip Daigle, et al. Baldur's Gate: Siege of Dragonspear. Beamdog.
  41. Richard Baker, Matt Forbeck, Sean K. Reynolds (May 2003). Unapproachable East. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 153. ISBN 0-7869-2881-6.
  42. Ed Greenwood (November 1991). Anauroch. Edited by Karen S. Boomgarden. (TSR, Inc.), p. 70. ISBN 1-56076-126-1.
  43. Darrin Drader, Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. Edited by John Thompson, Gary Sarli. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 154. ISBN 978-0-7869-3915-2.
  44. 44.0 44.1 Steven E. Schend (August 1997). “Book Two: Amn”. In Roger E. Moore ed. Lands of Intrigue (TSR, Inc.), p. 5. ISBN 0-7869-0697-9.
  45. Kevin Melka, John Terra (March 1995). “Campaign Book”. In Julia Martin ed. Ruins of Zhentil Keep (TSR, Inc.), pp. 22–23. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  46. Brian R. James, Ed Greenwood (September 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. Edited by Kim Mohan, Penny Williams. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 148. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  47. 47.0 47.1 47.2 Kevin Melka, John Terra (March 1995). “Campaign Book”. In Julia Martin ed. Ruins of Zhentil Keep (TSR, Inc.), p. 24. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  48. Darrin Drader, Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. Edited by John Thompson, Gary Sarli. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 146. ISBN 978-0-7869-3915-2.
  49. Kevin Melka, John Terra (March 1995). “Campaign Book”. In Julia Martin ed. Ruins of Zhentil Keep (TSR, Inc.), p. 4. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  50. slade, et al. (April 1996). “The Wilderness”. In James Butler ed. The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (TSR, Inc.), p. 68. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  51. slade, et al. (April 1996). “The Wilderness”. In James Butler ed. The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (TSR, Inc.), p. 74. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  52. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Edited by Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 50. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  53. Steve Kenson, et al. (November 2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. Edited by Kim Mohan. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 17. ISBN 978-0-7869-6580-9.
  54. 54.0 54.1 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Edited by Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 74. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  55. 55.0 55.1 Troy Denning (April 2014). The Sentinel. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 191–197. ISBN 0786964596.
  56. Greg Marks (2016-03-01). Assault on Maerimydra (DDEX03-16) (PDF). D&D Adventurers League: Rage of Demons (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 46–47.
  57. Greg Marks (2016-03-01). Assault on Maerimydra (DDEX03-16) (PDF). D&D Adventurers League: Rage of Demons (Wizards of the Coast), p. 70.
  58. Eric L. Boyd (June 2005). City of Splendors: Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 19. ISBN 0-7869-3693-2.
  59. Jason Carl, Sean K. Reynolds (October 2001). Lords of Darkness. Edited by Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 12. ISBN 07-8691-989-2.
  60. Darrin Drader, Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. Edited by John Thompson, Gary Sarli. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 124. ISBN 978-0-7869-3915-2.
  61. Darrin Drader, Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. Edited by John Thompson, Gary Sarli. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 126. ISBN 978-0-7869-3915-2.
  62. Darrin Drader, Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. Edited by John Thompson, Gary Sarli. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 91. ISBN 978-0-7869-3915-2.
  63. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Edited by Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 113. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  64. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Edited by Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 158. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  65. Steve Kenson, et al. (November 2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. Edited by Kim Mohan. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 73. ISBN 978-0-7869-6580-9.
  66. Eric L. Boyd (June 2005). City of Splendors: Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 38. ISBN 0-7869-3693-2.
  67. Steven E. Schend (August 1997). “Book One: Tethyr”. In Roger E. Moore ed. Lands of Intrigue (TSR, Inc.), p. 5. ISBN 0-7869-0697-9.
Advertisement