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Daggerford was a small but consequential town located in the Delimbiyr Vale within the greater Sword Coast.[2][13][11] While it was primarily a farming community, and considered by some to be a stopover town, the town had great ambitions to grow and be seen as an alternative to their northern neighbor of Waterdeep.[8][3]

Throughout its storied history, Daggerford's dukes claimed the lands from as far away as Floshin Estates to the north and Dragonspear Castle. In truth, the duchy comprised the town proper and the surrounding farmsteads that numbered around a score or more.[1][14]

Despite its modest size and somewhat inflated sense of importance, Daggerford was resilient. It was something of a relic from the old kingdom of Delimbiyr,[13] too stubborn to fall even when a series of wars, crusades, and other conflicts threatened the entirety of the Sword Coast.[15]

Daggerford's coat-of-arms was a silver dagger, covered in blood atop a field of dark blue.[1]

DescriptionEdit

It was a walled settlement with a population that by and large lived in the outlying hamlets, farms, and estates, rather than within the town proper. As such, the streets of Daggerford were not densely populated.[16] The town was significantly refurbished during the 13th century when many of its 40-odd wooden structures were remade in stone by the dwarves of Clan Ironeater.[2][3] Even after this improvement, Daggerford's roads were unpaved and several of its buildings were ramshackle in appearance even a century later.[16]

Surrounding the town's walls was a modest moat, with three crossing points at each of the town's three gates — the Farmer's Gate in the north, the Caravan Gate in the west, and the River Gate in the south.[17] For many years the moat was a dumping place for the town's refuse. Thankfully, this unfortunate and long-standing tradition was ceased in the late 15th century.[18]

Sitting atop a hill in the center of Daggerford was the grand Ducal Castle,[2] which was technically older than the town itself.[8]

GeographyEdit

The town was strategically placed along the Trade Way, within the idyllic countryside that encompassed the northern bank of the Delimbiyr River.[19] It was the largest settlement located between the metropolises of Waterdeep, 150 miles (241.4 km) to the north[20], and Baldur's Gate to the south.[2][note 1]

There were a number of small but notable landmarks situated around Daggerford. The familial estate of Sir Elorfindar Floshin was about two days of travel away, and the home of his son Elorshin was approximately the same distance away to the east. Near Elorshin's home was the temple known as the Mosque of Tyr, which the younger elf maintained.[21]

On a small hill near the town was an entrance to a nearby song path, a network of portals that were connected to works of oratorical works of art, such as songs and epic poems. The song path near Daggerford was referred to as the Voices of the Lost, named for the song that was required for its opening.[22]

Gillian's Hill,[8][9] Liam's Hold,[23] and Black Helm Tower were each within a day's travel away from Daggerford.[21]

GovernmentEdit

Since the founding of the Kingdom of Phalorm around the Year of Trials Arcane, 523 DR by Tyndal "Daggerford", the town was governed by Dukes through Tyndal's family line until at least the end of the Second Sundering.[24]

Around the Year of the Manticore, 1280 DR, a town charter was granted by Duke Conan, leading to the creation of the anonymous ruling body known as the Council of Guilds, modeled after the Masked Lords of Waterdeep. The town was too small to maintain such secrecy, however, and it was well known that the local guildmasters served at the seat of the council.[3][8][9][12][note 2]

Dukes of DaggerfordEdit

Circa 1270 DR, still young Edwin Daggerford was the Duke of Daggerford, until his death defending the city from Baatezu Gorgomorz. His young son Conan Daggerford inherited the title.[25]

As of the mid–14th century, the town was ruled by Duke Pryden Daggerford. Unfortunately, the duke lost his life in the First Dragonspear War. He was succeeded by his son, Pwyll "Greatshout" Daggerford, so named for his magically booming voice.[9]

After Duke Pwyll's presumed death in 1372 DR, the city's leadership was taken over by a wealthy merchant member of the city council Matagar Bugo. That brief change of power was a part of the Zhentarim plot to take over Daggerford. Matagar's reign ended as he was incinerated by the invading Gorgomorz. After the Zhentarim plot was thwarted and the city defended itself, Duke Pwyll returned to the throne, revealed still alive, and held hostage by the enemies of the city.[25]

Duke Maldwyn Daggerford received his title before the Year of the Iron Dwarf's Vengeance, 1485 DR as the tradition of primogeniture decreed that the title passed to the eldest male child. It was the opinion of many in the town, however, that his elder sister Lady Morwen would be more suited to the role.[26]

After the practice of primogeniture was suspended in the following year, Lady Morwen assumed the title of Duchess of Daggerford.[27]

TradeEdit

Due to its key location, Daggerford was a vital mercantile hub for its region of the Sword Coast. It was the site where goods moving on ships traversing the Delimbiyr River could be transferred to caravans journeying along the Trade Way or vice versa. The waterways of the Delimbiyr at Daggerford was too shallow for ships to continue upriver into the rest of the Delimbiyr Vale.[13]

While Daggerford emulated the grand, northern Metropolis of Waterdeep its trade services were somewhat limited. While it attracted its fair share of travelers, prices for local wares were often significantly marked up.[8]

The people of Daggerford were largely self–sufficient,[8] though they did import lumber from Andalor's Mill in Bowshot.[6]

GuildsEdit

After the establishment of guilds, each type of guild was maintained by a Guildmaster, even if it was only a single town representative, to ease trade between cities. They eventually formed into the Council of Guilds during the early 14th century, and many of them amalgamated into a fewer number of guilds by the 15th century.[27]

  • Mariners' Alliance was serving the town's many sailors, boatmen and other seafarers. In 1372 DR they were involved in weapon smuggling with the Zhetharim [25].

DefensesEdit

In addition to the Duke and his personal guard, Daggerford maintained a standing militia.[28] It comprised the town's citizens who were healthy enough to serve, regardless of gender or race. Those who were not required to serve were those who were too young or too old, women who were pregnant, and women who were raising young children.[29] As of the Year of the Banner, 1368 DR, the militia comprised only 50 individuals – though that was one-tenth of the town's citizens.[30]

Newly–recruited militiamen were granted some training and given very rudimentary arms. Service was required three days out of every month and typically consisted of fairly light duties, unless the town was in immediate peril.[29]

HistoryEdit

FoundingEdit

In the centuries after the elves of Illefarn abandoned their kingdom for the isle of Evermeet, in the Year of the Cantobele Stalking, 342 DR the kingdom of Delimbiyran arose in the area. It was during this age that Daggerford became a duchy and grew significantly in power and influence.[2][8]

The town took its name from a 10th century legend about a boy named Tyndal who protected his family and their trade wagon while crossing the Delimbiyr River. Tyndal's family was assaulted by lizardfolk raiders, and slew six of the beasts armed with only a dagger.[1] While the story grew into myth over the course of the next few hundreds of years,[19] records stated that fabled event did actually occur, at the future site of the Ducal Castle, in the Year of the Penitent Rogue, 931 DR.[31][32] All of the subsequent Dukes of Daggerford claimed to be descended from Tyndal.[2][33]

Having earned fame in his youth and wealth as a merchant, Tyndal married Eleesa, the daughter of the Duke of Calandor in the Year of the Foolish Bridegroom, 945 DR. Some two years later, the white dragon Cortulorrulagalargath came crashing to Toril after an aerial fight with the silver dragon Teskulladar, and demolished the city of Delimbiyran, killing the Duke but sparing his daughter and son-in-law. The newly-risen Duke Tyndal relocated the seat of power from its previous location, the Barony of Steeping Falls, and began construction of his Ducal Castle atop the ruined remnants of Morlin Castle.[31][33][34] Over the course of the next hundred years, the people of Daggerford began to build a proper town outside of the new castle.[8]

During the mid–13th century, Derval Ironeater and the rest of Clan Ironeater moved into town and began rebuilding many of its wooden structures out of stone.[2]

14th CenturyEdit

Coalition

The flag of Daggerford (right) with those of Waterdeep and the Flaming Fist

The town of Daggerford was given sovereignty in the Year of the Watching Cold, 1320 DR by Duke Conan Daggerford. He allowed for the formation of the Council of Guilds, the ruling body that has governed the town ever since.[8]

Circa the Year of the Tooth, 1270 DR, the Baatezu named Gorgomorz became the infamous "Daggerford's Devil", slaughtering countless innocents and aiming at Daggerford's destruction. Gorgomorz was banished by the young Duke Edwin Daggerford's trap but he was gravely injured in battle and shortly passed.[25]

Daggerford was the site of a great battle, when it was assaulted by the hordes of fiends that poured out from Dragonspear Castle in the Year of the Wyvern, 1363 DR. The town was defended and its assailants defeated by combined forces of elves, dwarves, and men.[35][36][37]

In the Year of the Banner, 1368 DR, Daggerford's army lent 50 of their soldiers, one-tenth of the town's population, to the Coalition army. They fought under the command of General Haither Stonehand who knew each of her soldiers personally.[15]

Also around that time, lizardfolk under the command of a lich named Redeye began extorting Duke Pwyll the sum of tens of thousands of gold pieces. The duke in turn hired several adventuring companies to remove the threat to the duchy.[38]

Sometime in the Year of the Tankard, 1370 DR, a group of trolls began to infest Daggerford's sewer system.[38]

In Year of Wild Magic, 1372 DR, Duke Pwyll Daggerford seeming perished during a hunt, gored by a wild beast. Daggerford mourned the death of the city's leader even though many found his death's circumstances highly suspicious. Shortly after, a wealthy merchant and a member of the city council Matagar Bugo proclaimed himself the new Duke. His great mercantile aspirations of turning Daggerford into a trading juggernaut to rival Waterdeep encountered unfortunate circumstances of bandits ambushing trade caravans in the middle of the day, secretly Zhentarim agents, orc forces supplied with weapon shipments that passed through Daggerford. The city militia's investigation bore no success.[25]

Eventually, Astriel Shalyn, an agent of the Lords' Alliance, a traveling adventurer, and their companions Purfbin Doogrick and Raegen Brunegar involved themselves to untangle the schemes and plots surrounding these events. Their investigation uncovered the Zhentarim forces entering a dark alliance with the infamous baatezu Gorgomorz and the tanarukk of Dragonspear Castle. The Zhentarim planted the puppet ruler Bugo to take over Daggerford, while Gorgomorz sought to destroy the town.[25]

Zhentarim planned on betraying Gorgomorz. Once the devil's orcs invaded Daggerford, Zhentarim would lead Matagar's griffon mercenaries to defeat the invaders, imprison Gorgomorz inside a magical orb, and leave Matagar Bugo as a puppet ruler with the full support of the citizens and the Lords' Alliance.[25]

Astriel's adventurers tracked the Duke and his sister Bronwyn to Illefarn, where they being kept under guard by the Griffons Mercenary Company. Pwyll and Bronwyn Daggerford were freed, and Astriel with her adventurers took a stand against Gorgomorz. In the end, they slew the devil, and returned Duke Pwyll back to the throne of Daggerford.[25]

15th CenturyEdit

At some point prior to the Second Sundering, the duchy of Daggerford entered into the Lords' Alliance.[14]

Around the Year of the Iron Dwarf's Vengeance, 1485 DR, Duke Maldwyn became involved with a woman named Natyssa. She was in fact a succubus called Pencheska working for Tarul Var of Thay, both of whom sought the duke's death. The duke himself became possessed by the spirit of Baazka, the pit fiend who was the orchestrated of the Second Dragonspear War a century before.[39][40]

The succubus and the spirit of the pit fiend attempted to murder Duke Maldwyn and incriminate a group of adventurers. While it was unknown how the conflict between the groups actually played out,[40] Pencheska was able to imprison the duke's sister Lady Morwen in Cromm's Hold, assume her likeness, and succeed her "brother" as Daggerford's new duchess. By the time the ordning was broken, when the region was being assaulted by giants, she had brokered an agreement with the Zhentarim to ensure the "safety" of her people.[41]

As of the Year of the Warrior Princess, 1489 DR, "Lady Morwen" was still serving as the town's duchess. It was unknown if the individual was the real duchess or still the succubus Pencheska posing as her.[12] Around this time, the "duchess" sent a recently formed adventurers group to the search for Christos Tellum, the noble heir to Tellum's Hold. The nobleman and his party went missing in the Dessarin Valley after some recent forest fires. The young nobleman was soon delivered to the "duchess" along with the mysterious magical flask he was set out to recover.[42]

After the flask was brought into the town, it was briefly plagued by a vampire Dar Lavien who unleashed the undead on the population. In the end, Dar Lavien but was slain by the same adventuring group sent to recover Tellum.[42]

The "duchess" used the adventurers to recover the Ambergul Blade under the pretense that its magic was needed to restore Christos Tellum's health. The blade wound up in the hands of the rakshasa Nadir, who utilized a slaadi portal to once again throw Daggerford into chaos. In the ensuing mayhem, the Ambergul Blade was used to uncork the mysterious magical flask, releasing an ancient red dragon called Karrnsyrrl. The dragon caused significant damage to Daggerford but departed shortly thereafter, along with Nadir and the young Christos.[42]

Notable LocationsEdit

Despite its rather small size and modest population, Daggerford was divided into four different quarters:[43]

Landmarks
  • Ducal Castle: The centerpiece of Daggerford was its long-standing castle, that has served the dukes of Daggerford since the age of Tyndal.[44][5][45] It was surrounded on three sides by the Commons, a small stretch of grasslands that could be used for grazing in case of a siege upon the town.[46] The Ducal Castle had a secret passage into the city, constructed by the Castle's dwarven builders. In 1372 DR it was used by Gorgomorz' forces to infiltrate Daggerford.[25]
  • Marketplace: Local grocers, farmers, and other merchants congregated within the town's open market twice a tenday in order to sell their goods.[46] For a short while, the stalls were collapsible as the militia had no dedicated training area when the town's barracks were built. The market vendors were exceptionally grateful when the soldiers were granted an area to the south.[48]
  • Drill fields: This wide-open area>[17] was used as training grounds for both the Daggerford militia and the local constabulary. Before an area was designated outside the town's walls, it often served as a temporary holding area for caravans.[21]
  • Caravan Grounds: This area was used to house the carts and wagons of those merchants and caravaneers who came to town for business. All manner of folks could be found among the drivers and caravan guards as they hailed from realms all across the Sword Coast.[18]
  • Tannery: When Daggerford was inflicted with sickness during the mid–15th century DR, the citizens blame the local guild of tanners and forced them to relocate the tannery outside of town, on the opposite side of the Trade Way.[17][18]

Town QuartersEdit

River Quarter

This area of the town held the city's docks and served those whose jobs revolved around ships and sea trade. Dockworkers unloaded cargo from ships that were bound for transport along the Trade Way, while some skippers and rivermen transported people down the Delimbiyr River to Secomber and the surrounding settlements.[49][45]

Some of the landmarks within the River Quarter were the town's jail and constabulary,[50][51]stables, and the militia's barracks;[5] the Table of the Sword shrine;[48] and next to the quarter, the massive Sullerton Shipbuilders.[17]

Caravan Quarter

Catering to those individuals passing through town on the trade business, this area of Daggerford comprised several shops and businesses, guildhalls, as well as a number of boarding houses. As such, it was nearly devoid of activity during the winter months, when caravan travel all but ceased.[43][52]

Notable locations included the grand Lady Luck Tavern,[53] Miller's Dry Goods,[17] and Fairfortune Hall.[54][5]

Farmers' Quarter

As the name suggested, many farmers and other folks that lived off the land made their home within this part of Daggerford. Animal pens and small livestock paddocks were a common sight throughout its streets.[49][52]

Found within this ward was the grand River Shining Tavern,[18] Cromach's Smithy,[55] and the Harvest House, the local temple to Chauntea.[52][5]

Money Quarter

Easily the most affluent region of town, this quarter comprised the grand buildings that were built nearest to the ducal castle.[49][45] Located within was the Sword Coast Traders' Bank,[55] the Lizard's Gizzard inn,[56] and a number of private residences.[17]

InhabitantsEdit

Due to its grand ambitions and rather one-sided rivalry with Waterdeep, Daggerford was able to attract scores of skilled craftsmen and artisans.[8][16][13] Nearly everyone in Daggerford knew one another and outsiders were readily welcomed, especially if they were looking to patronize the town's businesses.[12]

Notable InhabitantsEdit

14th Century
15th Century

LoreEdit

The Waterdhavian phrase "gone to Daggerford" referred to someone who was hiding out beyond Waterdeep's walls.[3]

AppendixEdit

AppearancesEdit

Adventures
Card Games
Video Games

NotesEdit

  1. While text from The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier – Daggerford (p. 2) states that Daggerford is south of the Delimbiyr River, a distinction that is shown on several overview maps from Volo's Guide to the Sword Coast (p. 66), Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition, and Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide, this has been retconned in 5th edition. Scourge of the Sword Coast (p.9) has a city map that clearly shows the town as being north of the river. This map overlaps the previous city map provided in The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier. Additionally, the town's orientation is also shown in Ghosts of Dragonspear Castle (p. 141).
  2. The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier - Daggerford states this event occurs in 1320 DR.

GalleryEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Ed Greenwood (1994). Volo's Guide to the Sword Coast. (TSR, Inc), p. 34. ISBN 1-5607-6940-1.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 slade (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (Daggerford). (TSR, Inc), p. 2. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 227. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  4. slade (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (Cities and Civilization). (TSR, Inc), p. 63. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 Tito Leati, Matthew Sernett and Chris Sims (February 2014). Scourge of the Sword Coast. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 20.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Ed Greenwood (1994). Volo's Guide to the Sword Coast. (TSR, Inc), p. 31. ISBN 1-5607-6940-1.
  7. slade (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (Cities and Civilization). (TSR, Inc), p. 3. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  8. 8.00 8.01 8.02 8.03 8.04 8.05 8.06 8.07 8.08 8.09 8.10 8.11 slade (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (Daggerford). (TSR, Inc), p. 3. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
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  28. Tito Leati, Matthew Sernett and Chris Sims (February 2014). Scourge of the Sword Coast. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 12.
  29. 29.0 29.1 slade (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (Daggerford). (TSR, Inc), p. 7. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
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