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Delzoun, also known as the Northkingdom, was a great dwarven nation of the North during the Age of the Proud People, reigning over the north for almost 4,000 years, from -3900 DR to -100 DR.[1][2]

GeographyEdit

At the height of their influence and strength, kingdom extended from the Ice Mountains south to the River Rauvin and Nether Mountains at its height.[2]

SocietyEdit

The name survives as a middle name among modern day dwarves, one of much prestige.[3]

CultureEdit

The Dirge of Delzoun was an epic dwarven ballad that recounted tales of the kingdom's mightiest heroes and greatest treasures.[4][5]

TradeEdit

Like their kin from Ammarindar to the south in the Greypeak Mountains,[5] the dwarves of Delzoun were masterful smiths, renowned for their skill as smiths and stone masons.[2]

Much of the Delzoun wealth was gained by trading with the Netherese humans, though they were also known trading allies of the elven realms of Illefarn and Eaerlann. They notably created the Fardrimm, a series of underground roads spanning the breadth of their empire and beyond into other areas of the North. The most famous of these underground roads was the Lowroad, which linked the Delzoun lands with Netheril. Dwarves of Delzoun would often trade gems, ironworks and weapons for gold and arcane secrets from the magocratic empire.[1][2]

Notable locationsEdit

Landmarks
Settlements
  • Ascore: This bustling port city, found on the shores of the Narrow Sea, prospered during the years when Delzoun trafficked goods to and from ancient Netheril.[6]
  • Citadel Adbar: The heroically resolute fortress survived for centuries after the fall of Delzoun,[7] and joined the nation of Luruar for some time,[8] before closing their borders to outsiders in the late 15th century DR.[9]
  • Citadel Felbarr: The capital fortress of Delzoun endured the orc invasions that claimed the realms of the Northdark,[1] but was eventually taken, and held for some time by the clan led by King Obould I Many-Arrows. It was however taken back by King Emerus Warcrown.[10]
  • Citadel Sundbarr: Built over the great volcanic chasm known as the everfire, this dwarfhold survived Delzoun's collapse by virtue of the colossal defenses forged from the primeval flame. It would go on to serve as the embodiment of the unity shared between the dwarves and heart humans of the North.[11]
  • Ghaurin's Hold: This millennia-old stone keep manor was the ancestral home of the Stoneheart clan, and served as a monument to their storied history.[6]

HistoryEdit

The dwarves completed construction of Citadel Felbarr in -1900 DR.[1]

The Illuskan Maerin Immar commissioned a number of Delzoun artisans, including Fardelver, to construct Gauntlgrym in -335 DR.[1]

Citadel Sundbarr and Ascalhorn accepted human refugees from the recently fallen Netheril in -333 DR. In the same year, the dwarves began to slowly abandon Ascore.[1]

In the Year of Terrible Anger, -111 DR, the Delzoun fell prey to the same orc assaults that devastated other kingdoms of the North, though the kingdom endured for few more years. Finally, in -100 DR, Delzoun fell to the phaerimms and other dangers. Surface settlements including Citadel Adbar, Citadel Felbarr, Mithral Hall, and Sundabar survived the fall but the underground settlements of the Northdark were not so fortunate.[1][12]

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AppendixEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 84. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 87. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  3. R.A. Salvatore (January 2007). The Hunter's Blades Trilogy Collector's Edition. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 978-0786943159.
  4. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 85. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 86. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 89. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  7. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 171. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  8. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 146. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  9. Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 59. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  10. Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 60. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  11. Ed Greenwood and Jason Carl (July 2002). Silver Marches. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 66. ISBN 0-7869-2835-2.
  12. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 88. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.

ConnectionsEdit

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