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King Duar "Longyears" Obarskyr was the 52nd monarch in the Obarskyr dynasty and ruler of Cormyr from the Year of the Argent Shafts, 425 DR, to the Year of the Winter Sphinx, 480 DR.[1] He was one of the most renowned warrior-kings in Cormyr's history, second only to King Dhalmass. During Duar's reign, the kingdom grew in size and strength. The army was larger, better trained, and better equipped, and the lands of Irongates, Jarthroon, and Wheloon were annexed.[3][note 1]

DescriptionEdit

Duar was extremely large and muscular,[4] reaching nearly 7 feet (2.1 meters) tall. He had dark blue (nearly black) eyes and brown hair. He developed streaks of gray in his hair and short beard relatively early in his life. In battle, he wielded a large two-handed sword in one hand and a devastating heavy mace in the other.[3]

PersonalityEdit

King Duar was a strong and capable warlord with a gruff exterior. His third wife, the Lady Jhanthyl Lagarr, however, found him to be understanding and even gentle,[3] despite having led the forces that killed her husband, Lord Kuthor Lagarr, in battle.[2]

During his reign, he called Castle Obarskyr "Helmstar Castle" because he claimed the name came to him in a dream.[2]

PossessionsEdit

Duar possessed the sword Orbyn, crafted for him by Amedahast.[4]

RelationshipsEdit

Duar's father was Azoun Obarskyr I. Duar's first wife was Daverna Turcassan,[5] the daughter of Lord Melineth from the noble house of Turcassan before its disgrace.[6] His second wife was Threena Cormaeril who gave birth to a son, Galaghard. After she died, Duar married Jhanthyl Lagarr.[2]

HistoryEdit

Duar was born in the Year of the Lady's Gaze, 385 DR, and inherited the throne upon his father's death in the Year of the Argent Shafts, 425 DR.[1]

In the Year of the Cat's Eye, 429 DR, he took an army to the King's Forest to battle orc invaders, but while he was gone, his father-in-law, Melineth Turcassan, sold the city of Suzail to pirates for the price of 500 sacks of gold.[6] Duar destroyed the orcs, but when he returned to Suzail, he was barred from entering, and the betrayal of Melineth almost broke him.[7] A price was put on Duar's head by Magrath the Minotaur but there were few who dared try to collect it.[4]

With the help of Threena, who had entered into a marriage with Lord Dheolur in order to spy on him and his traitorous machinations,[8] Duar killed both Dheolur[9] and Magrath in the Year of the Sea Princes, 432 DR, and reclaimed Suzail.[6] Daverna also died in the conflict,[10] and soon thereafter, he married Threena.[2]

In the Year of the Maiden's Tears, 475 DR, King Duar felt it necessary to challenge a perceived threat to the integrity of Cormyr—the newly constructed castle of Irongates Gard, erected by the cruel but prosperous warlord, Kuthor Lagarr. After Kuthor fell in battle, his wife, Jhanthyl took up a weapon and fought alongside the remaining knights. She agreed to surrender to Duar only if the rest of her people were allowed to live. Duar treated her well and, after Queen Threena passed away, they married. Duar died less than five years later in the Year of the Winter Sphinx, 480 DR, and Queen Jhanthyl mourned him greatly.[2]

King Duar was succeeded by his son, Galaghard.[1]

AppendixEdit

NotesEdit

  1. Irongates was a holding northeast of Wheloon and Jarthroon was west of Suzail on a rocky ridge overlooking the Dragonmere. Both settlements disappeared into history.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 77. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Ed Greenwood (January 2001). “The New Adventures of Volo: Lost Treasures of Cormyr, Part 2”. In Dave Gross ed. Dragon #279 (Wizards of the Coast), p. 83.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Ed Greenwood (January 2001). “The New Adventures of Volo: Lost Treasures of Cormyr, Part 2”. In Dave Gross ed. Dragon #279 (Wizards of the Coast), p. 82.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Ed Greenwood and Jeff Grubb (April 1998). Cormyr: A Novel (Paperback). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 241. ISBN ISBN 0-7869-0710-X.
  5. Ed Greenwood and Troy Denning Death of the Dragon. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 243. ISBN 0-7869-1863-2.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 73. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  7. Ed Greenwood and Jeff Grubb (April 1998). Cormyr: A Novel (Paperback). (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 240–241. ISBN ISBN 0-7869-0710-X.
  8. Ed Greenwood and Jeff Grubb (April 1998). Cormyr: A Novel (Paperback). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 252. ISBN ISBN 0-7869-0710-X.
  9. Ed Greenwood and Jeff Grubb (April 1998). Cormyr: A Novel (Paperback). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 248. ISBN ISBN 0-7869-0710-X.
  10. Ed Greenwood and Jeff Grubb (April 1998). Cormyr: A Novel (Paperback). (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN ISBN 0-7869-0710-X.

ConnectionsEdit

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