East Faerûn bordered the eastern expanses of the Sea of Fallen Stars. Here the sea formed a long arm that traveled to the east before turning south to become the Alamber Sea.[1] The northern nations of this mysterious area were termed by some people as the Unapproachable East[2] and the southern nations the Old Empires,[3] and, for a time, the Empires of the Alamber Sea.[4] Many of these nations allowed slavery, and depended on slaves for much of their economy.[5]

After the Spellplague, a few new nations arose in this regions, including two interloper nations from Abeir.[4]

Regions[edit | edit source]

Hordelands[edit | edit source]

Main article: Hordelands
  • Murghôm: After living under subjugation of Mulhorand for years, the farmers and horsemen that lived around Brightstar Lake gained partial independence for some time.[6] In the early 15th century DR, they came under rule of a ruling council known as the Dragon Princes.[7][8]
  • Semphar: This far-off realm garnered great wealth from its location between the continents of Faerûn and Kara-Tur.[6]

Old Empires[edit | edit source]

Main article: Old Empires
  • Chessenta: While the city-states of Chessenta were united together for about a hundred years, under the capital of Luthcheq,[9] they remained a nation in-name-only for most of its existence. The war-torn region comprised a number of city-states remained ever-competitive, often competing and leaguing against one another.[3] Despite their differences, they shared common cultural practices and ideals and banded together for the cause of shared defense.[10]
  • High Imaskar: Descendants of ancient Imaskar returned to their homelands after Mulhorand collapsed in the late 14th century DR. The newly-founded nation remained for some time,[11] before the Mulhorandi rallied back a century later and overthrew the Imaskari themselves.[12]
  • Mulhorand: One of the most ancient lands in Faerûn,[13] the formerly-grand empire west of the Plains of Purple Dust empire languished for many years until it was destroyed during the events of the Spellplague, and its lands were taken over by High Imaskar.[11] The nation reclaimed its glory during the events of the Second Sundering, when its gods returned to Toril, just as in the days when the empire was at the height of its power.[12]
  • Okoth: While the ancient sarrukh empire of Okoth fell into ruin millennia to the Days of Thunder, its denizens remained in the Lake of Salt for ages and slowly began to rebuild themselves during the Era of Upheaval.[14][15]
  • Threskel: Ruled for many years by an undead green dragon,[16] this coastal nation later became a vassal-state to Chessenta.[17][page needed]
  • Tymanther: The interloper nation of Tymanther was originally Tymanchebar, an Abeiran nation. In the wake of the Spellplague, Tymanchebar was nearly destroyed and much if its lands were sent to Faerûn, replacing Unther[18]—which in turn, was sent to Abeir.[19] The surviving dragonborn of Tymanchebar soon tamed the region and built a new nation that they called Tymanther,[18] which was largely reclaimed by Untherites when that nation returned to Toril in the Second Sundering.[19][20]
  • Unther: Like their long-time foes in Mulhorand, this former empire expanded across much of the east before suffering years of decline.[21] Throughout the centuries the gods of its divine pantheon were either slain or left to abandon their followers, its lands were taken by Mulhorand,[22] and later destroyed by the appearance of Tymanther or shifted away to the planet of Abeir.[18] It was only during the Second Sundering when the Untherite people were able to reclaim the northern region that was part of their old nation.[19][20]

Unapproachable East[edit | edit source]

Main article: Unapproachable East
  • Aglarond: This enigmatic magocracy lay on a long peninsula that jutted westward into the Sea of Fallen Stars. Its landward border joined it to the powerful nation of Thay, an enemy power whom the nation constantly opposed. Much of the peninsula was occupied by the Yuirwood, an old forest home to a great number of half-elves and ancient ruins. Along the eastern border were the Umber Marshes. For many years it was ruled by the Simbul, a sorceress who was just as feared as she was revered.[2]
  • Altumbel: The small kingdom encompassed the tip of the Aglarondan Peninsula.[23] Its people retained an isolationist attitude towards the rest of the region.[2]
  • Thay: This eastern nation was ruled by the malicious Red Wizards, a group known across the Realms for their use of great magic and the horrible practice of slavery. Much of their land was situated upon a large plateau, atop which sat a second plateau and the volcanic range of Thaymount.[24] For much of its history Thay was a human nation, that despite the enmity it gathered, was not dissimilar from other magocracies. This changed in the late 15th century however, when the ruling zulkirs all embraced undeath, transforming their land and its people into a realm of death.[25]

Vilhon Reach[edit | edit source]

Main article: Vilhon Reach
  • Akanûl: The Abeiran realm of the genasi was transported to Toril during the Spellplague of the late 14th century DR. Its unique geographical features stood in stark contrast to much of the surrounding lands of the east.[26]
  • Chondalwood: The lust, tropical forest was home to a great many sylvan creatures, strange walking plants, savage druids,[27] and for many years, a grand population of elves.[28] Its ancient trees housed the greatest number of ghostwise halflings in all the Realms.[29]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 101. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 199. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 181. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 85. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  5. Scott Bennie (February 1990). Old Empires. Edited by Mike Breault. (TSR, Inc.), p. 4. ISBN 978-0880388214.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 188. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  7. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 154. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  8. Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 137. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  9. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 100. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  10. Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 11. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 138. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  12. 12.0 12.1 Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 12. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  13. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 184. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  14. Ed Greenwood, Eric L. Boyd, Darrin Drader (July 2004). Serpent Kingdoms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 114. ISBN 0-7869-3277-5.
  15. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 166. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  16. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 183. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  17. Richard Lee Byers (2010). Whisper of Venom. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 0786955619.
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 186. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 13–14. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  20. 20.0 20.1 Erin M. Evans (October 4th, 2016). The Devil You Know. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 483–484. ISBN 978-0786965946.
  21. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 186. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  22. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 69. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  23. Steven E. Schend (1999). Sea of Fallen Stars. (TSR, Inc), p. 16. ISBN 0-7869-1393-2.
  24. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 205. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  25. Rob Heinsoo, Logan Bonner, Robert J. Schwalb (September 2008). Forgotten Realms Player's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 5. ISBN 978-0-7869-4929-8.
  26. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 90. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  27. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 217. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  28. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 91. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  29. Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 110. ISBN 978-0786965809.
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