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Evereska (pronounced: /ɛvɛrˈɛskɑːeh-ver-EH-ska[10], Elvish for "fortress home")[14] was a secreted city within a fabled valley in the Western Heartlands, one of the last realms of the elves in the North.[6] Founded in secret during the Founding Time, Evereska became a haven for the remaining Fair Folk in Faerûn following the Retreat,[10][15][5][16] during the early years of the Era of Upheaval.[17] It was the epitome of elven culture and beauty, and nearly no outsiders were considered welcome within.[8]

When I rest at the end of the day and retreat into reverie...I recall the Evereska I wandered as a youth, when I followed a haunting song or a wisp of light among the roiling fogs of the Greycloaks, picked sweet berries in the hollows of the hills, and swam in the cold streams that flowed out of their heights.
— Aedyn Graymantle, wilderness guide and ranger of Evereska.[18]

Description[]

Houses in Evereska were worked into the landscape, and it was possible to float large items in the city. Blueleaf trees covered the valley and were sculpted by magic. Weather conditions and diseases were regulated by the city's magical mythal,[13][18] a semi-sentient magical creation that protected the city and residents, granting them a better quality of life in myriad ways.[6]

Entrance[]

Admittance into Evereska was only available by means of the Passing,[19] a passageway that required a specific password or invitation from the Hill Elders to bypass peacefully.[6] The city could only be accessed by a select few well-protected tunnels or by direct ascent up its steep cliff face.[10]

Geography[]

Evereska loc

A map of the terrain surrounding Evereska circa 1370 DR.

The city of Evereska and its encompassing valley, along with the hills that encircled them, were considered to be found within the Backlands of the Western Heartlands. The entire region was well isolated from any nearby major settlements, surrounded by a difficult-to-traverse landscape, including the imposing Greycloak Hills that lay to the north,[20][21] the mysterious Forgotten Forest to the west, and the unforgiving desert border formed by Anauroch to the east.[22][23]

One of the few non-elf settlements near Evereska was the Halfway Inn and its adjoining village, located an hour's travel away from the city on the edge of its realm of influence.[24]

Geographical Features[]

Evereska City[]

The city of Evereska was situated on a large stone pedestal, formed the marble cliffs known as the Three Sisters, that rose nearly 1,000 ft (0.3 km) from the grassland below.[6][25]

Throughout the city, number of smaller hills and mounds served as landmarks by which to navigate. Among these were Bellcrest Hill;[26] Cloudcrown Hill lay in the northwest of the city,[6] around which were built a number of noble estates;[27] Moondark Hill in the east,[6] a place of worship for Solonor Thelandira[28] and known "ambushing spot" of the city's Hill Elders;[29] and Goldmorn Knoll rose just south of the heart of the city.[6]

Other natural markers in the city included the secluded Groaning Cave in the north,[30]the sparkling Dawnsglory Pond in the south, and Starmeadow.[6]

Evereska Vale[]

Beyond the city and the mesa atop which it sat were a grouping of flat farmlands known as the Meadow, the edge of which–designated the Meadow Wall–marked the border of the city's mythal. The wall was surrounded by the Vine Vale, a stretch of terraced vineyards and orchards[25] obscured by mists that sheltered the Evereska from outsiders.[6] The furthest reaches of Evereska's valley was the High Vale, a steep sloped forest of spruce trees that further hid the elven lands form outsiders.[31][32] Small clusters of structures and winding pathways could be found throughout the entirety of the valley.[24]

The whole of the Evereska Vale was completely encircled by twelve hills collectively known as the Shaeradim, further elevating[10] and hiding it from the greater valley around the hills.[33][34]

Flora & Fauna[]

The streets of Evereska were alive with birds, cats and small woodland critters that wandered in from the surrounding forests.[8] The elves of the city formed close bonds with these animals, often employing them as trusted messengers.[35]

Society[]

Evereska was known as the home of elven culture on mainland Faerûn for a period following the first collapse and rebirth of Myth Drannor. It was a place of refined beauty and ancient elven power,[8] home to The People's most powerful spellcasters and clergy of the Seldarine.[17]

As of the late 14th century DR, the city of Evereska was home to some of the most notable noble elven families.[36]

Culture[]

The elves of Evereska formed their own form of sign language, referred to as Evereskan finger talk.[37] It was often used for silent communication between elven sentries, such as those of the Tomb Guard.[38]

While it was known to once only be available to gnomish smiths, the secrets of the fabled arandur metal was known to some elven craftspeople of Evereska.[39]

The spirited drink Evereskan clearwater could be found in taverns outside the city, as far away as Waterdeep.[40]

Magic[]

Throughout its history, Evereska was home to elven dualists, practitioners of magic that focused on a single specific school of magic.[41]

Some Evereskan elves spent their time in deep caverns working to create new spells.[13]

Government[]

The leadership of Evereska comprised a group of senior elves and eladrin known as the Hill Elders,[5] a shared council that held court at the Hall of the High Hunt.[6] Members of the council included Tomb Master Kiinyon Colbathin, High Huntsman Pleufan Trueshot, Watcher Over the Hills Erlan Duirsar,[42][43] and Gervas Imesfor.[44]

The leaders of Evereska maintained contact with the Elven Imperial Fleet as of the 14th century DR.[45]

Law & Order[]

The Evereska Charter passed in the Year of the Snow Winds, 1335 DR, stated that anyone seen defiling tombs within the Greycloak Hills were subject to the judgment and punishment of the Evereskan elves.[10]

Trade[]

The elves of Evereska were largely self-sufficient, but did trade with other cities of the Realms, sometimes as far away as the continent of Zakhara.[28] Because the hills around Evereska contained little in the way of ores, metals were imported into the city in exchange for paintings, sculptures, crafted wooden items, and wine.[13]

Prominent trade families included the moon elf houses of Alaenree, Coudoarluth, Presrae, and Straeth; the gold elf Elond, Immeril, and Naelgrath families; and the sylvan elf family of Shalandalan.[46]

Defenses[]

The warriors defending the city were so adept they would easily intercept any traveler coming within 10 mi (16 km) of the Evereska Vale.[10] They were equipped with enchanted armor that allowed them to fly.[13]

Armed Forces[]

Evereskan Tomb Guardian - Joel Thomas

One of the vigilant sentries of the Tomb Guard.

The collective military of the city was properly referred to as the 'Army of Evereska', which comprised several different branches. The Long Watch as the exterior army beyond the protection of the city's valley, and the Swords of Evereska served the noble army, composed of the Noble Blades and Lordly Wands,[47] Evereska's most skill warriors were drawn into the Cold Hand, an elite force commanded by High Lord Duirsar himself.[6]

The Vale Guard served as Evereska's equivalent of a city guard,[6][48] whose jurisdiction extended out to the greater valley,[49] while the Tomb Guard acted as protectors of all elven crypts within the Greycloak Hills.[6] Finally the Feather Cavalry served as aerial mounted sentries that watched over Evereska's skies.[10][49]

History[]

Early History[]

Evereska's valley was believed to have first been populated by elves during the Founding Time,[50][51] specifically in the −8600 DR by several clans hailing from ancient Aryvandaar. They sought to create a secret refuge for their people, known only to the Tel'Quessir.[52][53]

A millennium later in −7600 DR, Evermeet began to experience significant overcrowding, which led in part to the founding of Sharrven in the borders of the High Forest.[54] When the empire of Aryvandaar fell, the elves of Evereska allied themselves with those from Sharrven to help prevent the realm of Siluvanede from suffering the same fate.[55] These efforts were made in vain however, and in −2770 DR, the fey'ri of Siluvanede brought about the collapse of Sharrven and the slaughter of its people. Many of the survivors turn to Evereska for shelter and survival.[56]

The existence of Evereska remained secret until the Year of the Elfsands, 244 DR, when its location was uncovered by human tribes living within the Greycloak Hills. They only managed to keep the city's secret safe for a mere few centuries.[57][58][59]

In the Year of True Names, 464 DR, the first human ever was granted admittance into Evereska. He was a chosen of Mystra known as Arun's Son, an individual that nearly sacrificed his own life to save several Evereskans from one of the malevolent phaerimm.[60]

Evereska received refugees from Askavar in the Wood of Sharp Teeth, after its fall during the late 6th century DR.[61]

14th Century[]

In Nightal of the Year of the Unstrung Harp, 1371 DR, dual effects of weave magic and shadow magic created an opening in the Sharn Wall beneath the Greycloak Hills,[62][63] and the maligned phaerimm were released from their subterranean prison. After enthralling scores of bugbear,s mind flayers, and beholders, the phaerimm began an assault on the outer valley of Evereska, devastating much of the lush landscape. Fortunately they were turned away by combined forces of the Evereskan elves and allies from Waterdeep led by Khelben Arunsun.[64] In the following weeks the elven warriors were joined in battle by the arcanists of Thultanthar,[65] and in Mirtul of the next year, the forces of the Lords' Alliance led by Laeral and Storm Silverhand. Finally in Eleasis of the Year of Wild Magic, 1372 DR, that year, the phaerimm and their army were finally defeated and driven out of Evereska for good.[66][1]

During the conflict, the aberrant monstrosities damaged the city's mythal causing further disruption to the vale. While the Evereskans were able to repel the attack using magic,[13] the mythal had to be rebuilt. The city's High Mages were able to repair the nearly all of the protection on their own, but required assistance from Galaeron Nihmedu, a novice practitioner of shadow magic. This caused the restored mythal of Evereska to be the first ever formed from both the Weave and magic drawing from the Shadow Weave.[1]

In the aftermath of the fighting, a few phaerimm and elves who lost their wits in the battle wandered the Evereskan valley.[13] Nearly all of the Tomb Guard were killed, along with many of the Vale Guard and more than half of the Swords of Evereska.[67][1]

Aftermath and Continued Conflicts[]

The survivors of the battle with the phaerimm were all younger elves, and they protected their existence violently if they encountered a threat. They regarded looters as deserving of death. Occasional clashes broke out between the surviving elves and phaerimm. Some elves traveled from other parts of Faerûn to join the remaining Evereskan elves, and some removed the remaining treasures of Evereska, moving them to safer locations.[13]

Following the conflict, the gardens of the valley became untended and overgrown and many of the bridges in the valley were broken. Elves designated helmed horrors and shield guardians to protect their houses. The damage to the mythal caused Evereska to be cloaked in mist or fine rain. Unpredictable magical effects arose seemingly out of nowhere.[13]

Evereska faced another grave threat in the Year of Lightning Storms, 1374 DR, when an army of fey'ri led by Sarya Dlardrageth marched upon the city.[68] The city was saved by the efforts of Seiveril Miritar, a gold elf lord of Evermeet. In what would become known as Seiveril's Crusade, the elf lord left his on the isle of elves and raised an volunteer army to save their fellow Tel'Quessir on the mainland.[69][70]

Following the world-altering Spellplague that wracked Faerûn a decade later, in the Year of Three Streams Blooded, 1384 DR, the barrier between Evereska and the Feywild became less distinct and clear. For some time it existed equally between both the Feywild and the Prime Material plane.[6] In the years that followed, many of the city's half-elf residents moved north to the lands of men where they were more readily welcomed.[71]

In a stark change of tradition, Evereska eventually opened up its borders and allowed outlanders to enter within.[72]

15th Century[]

During the emergence of the second Netherese empire, the elves of Evereska remained stalwart defenders against the empire's westward expansion.[73]

After the second fall of Myth Drannor in the Year of the Rune Lords Triumphant, 1487 DR,[74] many refugees came to Evereska but some of them were unhappy with Evereska's reclusiveness.[24]

Rumors & Legends[]

As of the late 14th century DR, Evereska was only known to most humans by mere rumor or legend.[75]

According to some scholars, the Evereska Valley was said to be protected by the direct magic of Corellon Larethian, patron of the Seldarine,[8][10] which prevented any form of teleportation within its borders.[20]

Notable Locations[]

Buildings[]

Landmarks[]

Inhabitants[]

Evereska was known as a safe haven for all members of the Harpers, one of the few predominantly human groups that were granted admittance within.[17]

The city was home to one cell of the Eldreth Veluuthra, a collective of elves that believed in wielding violence to further the interests of the elven people.[36] It also boasted one of the most exclusive elven mercenary companies in all the Realms, the Silent Rain.[79][80]

Notable Inhabitants[]

Appendix[]

Gallery[]

Appearances[]

References[]

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