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The Faerûnian pantheon was the most worshiped pantheon on Faerûn, a continent on Toril.[1]

OrganizationEdit

MembershipEdit

The Faerûnian pantheon was a pantheon of deities. Pantheons were a group of deities who were worshiped by people who shared one characteristic, for example sharing the same cultural or racial background.[2] In the Faerûnian pantheon's case the believers' shared characteristic was a geographic one, people who lived in those parts of the continent Faerûn where other pantheons did not hold sway were the believers.[3]

HierarchyEdit

The Circle of Greater Powers were the ones who led the pantheon. The leadership was a loose matter and was more of administrative nature. Apart from this, there was little hierarchy in the Faerûnian pantheon[4] except for the one the gods created among themselves. A unique trait of the Faerûnian pantheon was that deities with similar portfolios clustered in a hierarchic relationship.[1] The reason they did this, or to be more precise the reason why the highest deity did not just kill the lower-ranking ones and assumed their places, was surmised to be either a bargain where the lower-ranking deity helped the higher-ranking one at increasing its influence in return of protection, or blackmail where the higher-ranking one bullied the lower-ranking ones into giving them their divine energy and servitude. It was assumed that the exact nature of such arrangements varied with the personalities of the involved deities.[5]

ActivitiesEdit

The Faerûnian pantheon was a very fractious one that fought among themselves and had no overarching goal. This fractious nature was believed to be the source of the pantheon's adaptability and its ability to expand. When it expanded its physical sphere of influence, it usually did so at the expense of other pantheons.[4]

The aforementioned Circle of Greater Powers regulated the deities according to the rules as set by Ao, the overgod of Toril to whom all pantheons worshiped on Toril were subject to. However, this the leaders rarely if ever met to do their jobs and even when they did their reaction time was very long, not because they needed a lot of time to think, but due to internal strife.[6]

TacticsEdit

As mentioned above, the Faerûnian pantheon was a single-sphere pantheon. The reason why gods deliberately concentrated their work on one single world at the exclusion of others was that this way they could shut out deities from other worlds entering and infringing on their home turf.[7]

Base of OperationsEdit

The Faerûnian pantheon had—as it was normal for single-sphere pantheons—no base of operations. The members held their divine realms where it suited them most.[8] The closest to a base of operations was Cynosure, a pavillon on a demiplane, where the Circle of the Greater Powers met.[4]

RelationshipsEdit

As mentioned above, the Faerûnian pantheon was subject to Ao and tried to execute his rule of Balance.[6]

As mentioned above, single-sphere pantheons were good at defending themselves from infringement from potential external rivals. This came at the cost of interplanar unimportance, Toril's deities were, as deities who were worshiped only on a backwater plane like Toril, unimportant deities on the interplanar political landscape. However, the rate at which their importance grew was equal to that of the most vibrant of pantheons. That said, the Faerûnian pantheon ever becoming an important force on the interplanar landscape was considered unlikely at best.[8]

The Faerûnian pantheon as a whole had special relationships with the Chultan pantheon. The pact between the two was quite simple, Ubtao would look out for Dendar while the Faerûnian pantheon would leave Ubtao's turf alone for this service.[9]

HistoryEdit

The Faerûnian pantheon was created out of the merging of at least four pantheons, the Coramshite pantheon, the Jhaamdathan pantheon, the Netherese pantheon, and the Talfiric pantheon. These pantheons were all geographically divided human pantheons.[10] In ancient times, human pantheons were loosely geographically divided because the humans' population density and area was such that they did not border each other.[11] Over time, the human cultures and borders intermingled with each other and their pantheons intermingled too. When this happened, deities of similar portfolios had to fight each other for supremacy to get rid of the other one. Over time, the pantheons merged together and the Faerûnian pantheon was born. For example, Garagos and Tempus, both war gods of the Netherese and Talfiric pantheon respectively, fought each other and the former lost.[10] It was not clear when exactly the various pantheons merged into the Faerûnian pantheon. Various gods entered and dropped out of the pantheon.

For example, Jergal split his portfolio among three mortals, Bane, the new god of strife, Bhaal, the new god of murder, and the Myrkul, the new god death,[12] the last whom Jergal served.[13] Other mortals who arose to godhood were Azuth, who needed to fight over his position with Savras,[14] Gwaeron Windstrom, the Red Knight, Torm, and Uthgar.[15]

As mentioned above, the Farûnian pantheon was a single-sphere pantheon. Gods formed such with the objective of shutting out other world's deities from Toril. That said, various deities managed to sneak into the pantheon of Toril and the number of such deities was expected to increase. That world was a favored destination of foreign deities who were losing influence for one or the other reason. Examples included Oghma and Silvanus from the Celtic pantheon, Tyr from the Norse pantheon, and Loviatar and Mielikki from the Finnish pantheon, all entering the Faerûnian pantheon to cling to life and/or some degree of influence.[16] Another example was Tyche from the Greek pantheon who split in two deities Beshaba and Tymora over the course of the Dawn Cataclysm.[17]

Era of UpheavalEdit

Time of Troubles

The gods, not only of the Faerûnian pantheon but all of them, were cruel creatures who exploited mortals while not pursuing their duties on levels that horrified Ao, who was losing his patience with them because of it. The last straw was the theft of the Tablets of Fate at the hand of Bane and Myrkul,[18] two deities of the Faerûnian pantheon.[19] The Time of Troubles was started by Ao as a response.[18] During that time, Toril's deities had to possess mortals or walk in avatar form on the world.[20]

During that time, a deity's avatar's death could mean the death of the deity. Among the deities who died were Bane, Bhaal, Myrkul, Mystra, and Torm, the last one was reinstalled, the first three's positions were overtaken by Cyric, and Mystra's was overtaken by Midnight. Other deities who arose over the course of the Time of Troubles were Iyachtu Xvim[21] and Finder Wyvernspur by killing an avatar of Moander.[22] Shar killed two deities, Ibrandul and Eshowdow. The latter had potential to become important for the Shadow Giant was a member of the Chultan pantheon and Shar making inroads into that pantheon was an action that did potential harm to the agreement between the Faerûnian pantheon and the Chultan one.[23]

A pantheon that stopped working as one because of the Time of Troubles was the Untheric pantheon. Its surviving members, Hoar and Tiamat, signed up with the Faerûnian one.[10] The end of the Untheric pantheon had another effect too, for Unther's territory was up for the taking by either the Faerûnian or Mulhorandi pantheon. Both pantheons' stance regarding the matter could be summed up as "stand by and watch",[11] but the smaller Mulhorandi one feared to be swallowed up by the bigger one.[24]

Another presumed effect of the Avatar Crisis was that the gods of the Faerûnian pantheon started to look out for other sources of faith outside of Toril to become more powerful.[1]

Interim Years

The troublesome time for the Faerûnian pantheon did not end with the Time of Troubles. Cyric tried to increase his power. He killed Leira for that goal and ordered the writing of the Cyrinishad, a book that made the reader belief that Cyric was the greatest person in existence, and completed it. He read it himself and fell into delusional hubris. In the wake of his madness, he lost the portfolio of death to Kelemvor and that of tyranny to Iyachtu Xvim.[25] Cyric later came back to his senses[26] in 1371 DR.[27]

In 1368 DR, Velsharoon became a deity.[28] In 1372 DR, Bane returned by killing his son Xvim.[29]

In 1374 DR, Daelegoth Orndeir cast Amaunator's eternal sun and with it heralded the transformation of Lathander to Amaunator.[30] In the same year, Mask handed his power and life over to Shar.[31]

In 1384 DR, Tyr killed Helm over the misunderstanding that the latter wanted an adulterous relationship with his wife Tymora.[32] In 1385 DR, Tyr abdicated[33] and died fighting a demon horde.[34]

In 1385 DR, Cyric murdered Mystra and with it the Spellplague happened. On the divine side, Savras died with Dweomerheart,[32] Azuth fell into the Nine Hells and was eaten by Asmodeus who then became a deity.[35] Deneir built himself and the Metatext into the Weave or what remained of it and ceased to exist.[36]

Post-Spellplague

After the Spellplague, various formerly racial deities made inroads into the Faerûnian pantheon and various racial deities turned out to be Faerûnian deities' aspects ad vice versa.

Examples of gods who had aspects in the form of racial deities were Aerdrie Faenya, who turned out to be Akadi, or Hanali Celanil, who turned out to be Sune.[37] A reverse example was Talos who turned out to be Gruumsh, the orcish head deity.[38]

Members of racial pantheons who made inroads into the Faerûnian one were Corellon, Ghaunadaur, Gruumsh, Lolth, and Moradin.[39]

Lolth tried to become the deity of magic in 1480 DR.[40] She failed and Mystra returned to power.[41]

Second SunderingEdit

In the wake of the Second Sundering, a number of deities made their return.[42] Drasek Riven put on the mantle of Mask.[43] The formerly racial deities left the Faerûnian pantheon for their racial ones.[44]

MembersEdit

Members after the Second SunderingEdit

The following were members of the Faerûnian pantheon after the Second Sundering:

Akadi
Akadi was the goddess of air.[42] In the wake of the Spellplague, she turned out to be a primordial.[45]
Amaunator
Amaunator was the god of the sun. He was prayed to for desirable weather, but was also the object of worship when keeping laws and oath was the matter at hand for he was viewed as a strict deity to whom the rule of law was very important.[46]
Asmodeus
Asmodeus was the god of indulgence. His belief lived from the fact that when mortals did not follow their patron deity's edicts, they had a longer time to wait on the Fugue Plane or might stay there for eternity. People prayed to him to be provided with entertainment during the waiting time or cover their transgressions up so they had a chance to leave the Fugue Plane.[47]
Auril
Auril was the goddess of winter. Her worship was done in cold regions in the hope of her making winter easier to live through.[48]
Azuth
Azuth was the god of wizardry. He was the god of the practice of magic but not of magic itself. Worship of him was done when wizardry was practiced in some way like scribing scrolls, memorizing spells, and so on.[49]
Bane
Bane was the god of tyranny. Bane stood for the notion that "might makes right". Worshipers of his were culpable for violent acts, but the majority of his adherents were so because Bane stood also for order and were viewed as problem-solvers. However, even that often had a dark touch to it.[50]
Beshaba
Beshaba was the goddess of misfortune. Worship of her was done to appease her and with it spare misfortune for themselves.[51]
Bhaal
Bhaal was the god of murder. Naturally, praying to him was not something average people did. It was something who killed, either for a living or for other reasons, did.[52]
Chauntea
Chauntea was the goddess of agriculture. She had two aspects, one agricultural one that was almost exclusively prayed to in rural areas and onw as a mother goddess, in whose aspect she collected faith from everybody who felt secure at home.[52]
Cyric
Cyric was the god of lies. He stood for the notion that no bond was permanent.[53]
Deneir
Deneir was the god of writing. His adherents believed that unrecorded information would eventually get lost. He was customarily invoked when people wrote or created works of art.[54]
Eldath
Eldath was the goddess of peace. A substantial part of her base consisted of pacifists or those scarred by violence.[54]
Gond
Gond was the god of craft. His worshiper-base consisted of craftsmen like blacksmiths, engineers, weavers, and so on. It was believed that he was at his happiest when people invented something.[55]
Grumbar
Grumbar was the god of earth.[42] In the wake of the Spellplague, he turned out to be a primordial.[56]
Gwaeron Windstrom
Gwaeron Windstrom was the god of tracking. His worshiper-base consisted of rangers in the North. He was prayed to as exemplar among rangers and as the one who would made his worshipers' needs heard by Mielikki.[57]
Helm
Helm was the god of watchfulness. His worshiper-base consisted of people whose jobs revolved around protecting like bodyguards. He was a god who preached vigilance and preparedness.[57]
Hoar
Hoar was the god of revenge and retribution. Normally, he was not prayed to at all. However, he was frequently invoked by wronged parties who wanted retribution on the wrongdoer and by people like bounty hunters or those who pursued vengeance against wrongdoers by themselves.[58]
Ilmater
Ilmater was the god of endurance. His worshipers often worked to diminish suffering in the world. This included both doing chartable work to tend to victims of calamities like plagues or war, but also stopping violence by force.[59]
Istishia
Istishia was the god of water.[42] In the wake of the Spellplague, he turned out to be a primordial.[45]
Jergal
Jergal was a god who worked as Kelemvor's scribe. People who directly prayed to him were rare except by those who had the custom of putting parchment with the dead's name on it into his or her mouth.[60]
Kelemvor
Kelemvor was the god and judge of the dead who sent their soul to their final destination. His followers tasked themselves with three duties. Preparing people for death by ordering their affairs, prevent things that prevent people from dying naturally, and destroying undead.[61]
Kossuth
Kossuth was the god of fire.[42] In the wake of the Spellplague, he turned out to be a primordial.[45]
Lathander
Lathander was the god of dawn and renewal. He was worshiped when something began, be it a new business, marriage, entire community, and so on.[62]
Leira
Leira was the goddess of illusion. Regular worship to her was solely done by illusionists and con artists. Other occasions to pray to her was done by people who had secrets or wanted to protect themselves from deceit while doing something important.[62]
Lliira
Lliira was the goddess of joy. Celebrations were the occasions at which she was invoked.[63]
Loviatar
Loviatar was the goddess of pain. According to her teachings, the ability to deal and endure pain were the measure for power. She was prayed to by sadists, masochists, and people who pursued jobs that included dealing pain like torturers.[63]
Malar
Malar was the god of the hunt. Worshipers of his were primarily people who had something to do with hunting. He was prayed by those who hunted for success at it or to scare away competition.[63]
Mask
Mask was the god of thieves. Regular worship to him came from two groups, actual thieves and normal people who tried to appease him so he let their valuables alone.[64]
Mielikki
Mielikki was the goddess of forests. She was rarely prayed to, even by rangers whom she patronized. She was viewed as protector of good people in her terrain, for example, people who were looking for children who got lost in forests prayed to her for their protection until found.[65]
Milil
Milil was the god of poetry and song. He was the patron of bards and entertainers of all stripes prayed to him.[66]
Myrkul
Myrkul was the god of death. People who regularly prayed to him were rare, he was more an object of fear and considered the culprit behind aging symptoms.[67]
Mystra
Mystra was the goddess of magic. Her worshiper-base consisted of people who regularly dealt with magic, be it by spellcasting or magic items. In fact, she was the one who made magic possible for the denizens of Toril and her adherents tried to spread the use of it.[67]
Oghma
Oghma was the god of knowledge. People who dealt in some form with knowledge and ideas like clerks, inventors, sages, and the like form his worshiper-base. Anathema to his belief was the spreading of lies and ignorance.[68]
Red Knight
The Red Knight was the goddess of strategy. As such, average people did not pray to her. However, people who dealt with strategy of war be it in teaching or executing them, were often followers of her.[69]
Savras
Savras was the god of divination and fate. Aside from people who needed the truth, like investigators, judges, or diviners, worship of him was very rare.[69]
Selûne
Selûne was the goddess of the moon. She was worshiped by three groups of people. First, by women in her function as a mother goddess who held sway over reproductive cycles. Second, by navigators and sailors in her function as a goddess of navigation. Third, by people who needed some form of protection or guidance in darkness.[69]
Shar
Shar was a darkness and loss. She was regularly prayed to by people who worked in darkness and required protection like miners. In her loss aspect, she was prayed to by people who wanted to lose certain memories, wanted to recover their lost objects, or fell in deep despair.[70]
Silvanus
Silvanus was the god of wild nature. He stood for the notion that the untamed state was the state of nature that should be. His regular worshiper base consisted of explorers, travelers in wild areas, and denizens of rural areas.[71]
Sune
Sune was the goddess of beauty and love. It was believed that pleasurable sensations were the touch of her and her followers, believers in true love, pursued such sensations.[72]
Talona
Talona was the goddess of poison and disease. She was held responsible for all kind of negative matters that involved disease and poison like crop failings. This made her one of the most invoked deities but invoking her was mostly done as appeasement and her regular worshiper-base was small.[73]
Talos
Talos was the god of storms. He was viewed like a random natural force of destruction. His worshiper-base consisted of the likes of marauders. The reasoning behind it being that people should take whatever they could before Talos would randomly destroy them. Ordinary people tried to appease him.[73]
Tempus
Tempus was the god of war. His large worshiper-base had a lot of soldiers in it. His church's cultural achievement was to make a set of rules for war acceptable among various nations.[74]
Torm
Torm was the god of courage and self-sacrifice. He stood for a plethora of virtues like duty or loyalty and his worshiper-base consisted of people of every station who tried to emulate his virtues.[75]
Tymora
Tymora was the goddess of good fortune. A large portion of her worshiper-base consisted of adventurers and gamblers. Apart from such people with risky lives, people of all stripes found some appeal in her.[75]
Tyr
Tyr was the god of justice. His followers were not always adherents of concepts like fairness or equality, but they were adherents of the concept that offenders needed to be exposed and punished as such.[76]
Umberlee
Umberlee was the goddess of the sea. It was common in coastal communities to hold festivals to appease her as well as to beseech her for favors. Fear from sea disasters was the primary motivator of her worship.[77]
Valkur
Valkur was the god of sailors of the Northlanders. He was revered by Northlanders for they saw in him their best qualities to strive for.[78]
Waukeen
Waukeen was the goddess of trade. Her worshiper-base consisted of people who engaged in trade including in illegal ones like smuggling. They saw a virtue in creating business opportunities, which was why they were not on good footing with guilds and monopolies.[79]

Former MembersEdit

The following were at one time or the other members of the Faerûnian pantheon but dropped out of it for various reasons by the post-Second Sundering era:

Corellon
Corellon was the head of the Seldarine, the elven pantheon.[80] After the Spellplague, he entered the Faerûnian pantheon[81] and left the same after the Second Sundering.[82]
Finder Wyvernspur
Finder was one of the original Harpers who obtained his godhood by killing an avatar of Moander and became the god of the cycle of life, transformation of art, and saurials.[83] He was one of the deities who disappeared in the wake of the Spellplague.[84]
Garagos
Garagos was the war-god of the Netherese pantheon,[85] who lost to Tempus in a power struggle, died, and returned in 1368 DR.[86] He survived the Spellplague as an exarch of Tempus,[87] but disappeared in the wake of the Second Sundering.[42]
Gargauth
Gargauth was an archdevil who became a deity by killing Astaroth.[86] He disappeared in the wake of the Spellplague,[84] but re-surfaced after the Second Sundering as a non-divine creature with ambitions for godhood and a supplier of infernal pacts for warlocks.[88]
Ghaunadaur
Ghaunadaur was a member of the drow pantheon,[89] but left it when the other members died out and Lolth threatened his life. After the Spellplague, he became a member of the Faerûnian pantheon.[90] After the Second Sundering, he returned to the Dark Seldarine[91] leaving the Faerûnian pantheon[42] and became a supplier of Great Old One warlock pact.[88]
Gruumsh
Gruumsh was a member of the orcish pantheon.[92] After the Spellplague, he made inroads into the Faerûnian one[90] and left it after the Second Sundering.[42]
Ibrandul
Ibrandul was the god of cavern, dungeon, the Underdark, and skulks and was killed by Shar. His worship survived under her.[93]
Iyachtu Xvim
Iyachtu Xvim was the son of Bane and became the god of tyranny after his father's demise in the Time of Troubles.[94] Around 1372 DR, his father burst out of him, he died, and his position was retaken by his father.[29]
Karsus
Karsus was the inventor of the Karsus's avatar spell and managed to become a god for a single moment. Mystryl died in the process of protecting the Weave from him and he turned out to be not competent enough to handle the divine position and became some form of unresponsive being with a cult that dedicated itself to restore him.[95]
Lolth
Lolth was the head goddess of the drow pantheon and made her first inroads into the drow pantheon by masquerading as Moander,[96] the Faerûnian god of rot.[97] She made inroads into the Faerûnian pantheon as herself after the Spellplague[98] and left it after the Second Sundering.[82]
Lurue
Lurue started as a non-human deity, but managed to make her way into the Faerûnian pantheon by gaining human worshipers.[99] She went missing in the wake of the Spellplague,[84] but returned in the wake of the Second Sundering as a lesser deity[100] but not as a part of the Faerûnian pantheon.[42]
Moander
Moander was the Faerûnian deity of decay[97] who was killed by Finder Wyvernspur, but both his cult[101] and he himself managed to survive in one form or the other.[102] After the Second Sundering, he managed to make a full comeback as a deity of decay, not as a member of Faerûnian pantheon, who also acted as a supplier of Great Old Ones warlock pacts.[103]
Moradin
Moradin was the head of the Morndinsamman.[104] After the Spellplague, he made inroads into the Faerûnian pantheon.[98] He left it after the Second Sundering.[105]
Nobanion
Nobanion started as a non-human deity, but managed to make his way into the Faerûnian pantheon by gaining human worshipers.[99] In the wake of the Spellplague, he became a plague-affected monster, but was restored from this condition by Stedd Whitehorn.[106] He was not a member of the Faerûnian pantheon after the Second Sundering.[42]
Sharess
Sharess, the goddess of hedonism, and Bast from the Mulhorandi pantheon were one and the same person. She entered the Faerûnian pantheon by Ao's decree to counterbalance Mask becoming the patron of thievery in the Old Empires because they had nobody to fill that role there. Due to her hedonistic nature, she was almost subsumed by Shar, but managed to escape from her with Sune's help.[107] She survived the Spellplague as an exarch of Sune,[108] but disappeared from the Faerûnian pantheon after the Second Sundering.[42]
Shaundakul
Shaundakul was the god of travel.[109] He was one of the gods who disappeared in the wake of the Spellplague.[84]
Shiallia
Shiallia was the goddess of the High Forest.[107] She survived the Spellplague as an exarch of Mielikki,[108] but disappeared in the wake of the Second Sundering from the Faerûnian pantheon.[42]
Siamorphe
Siamorphe was the goddess of nobles. Her position and name was one that was handed over to the next mortal when the current one was dying.[107] While this line survived the Spellplague as an exarch of Amaunator,[108] the name Siamorphe was not one among those who comprised the Faerûnian pantheon after the Second Sundering.[42]
Ulutiu
Ulutiu was the god of glaciers. He had an adulterous relationship with Othea, a giant-deity who was married to their head deity Annam All-Father. When he was discovered, he negotiated with the husband that he would go into hibernation and his adulterous partner would be spared.[110] He went missing in the wake of the Spellplague.[84]
Uthgar
Uthgar was the god of the Uthgardt barbarians. He was almost certainly a mortal called Morgred Gardolfsson who ascended to divinity after a successful career as a raider and founder of the Uthgardt barbarians.[111] He survived the Spellplague as an exarch of Tempus,[87] but disappeared in the wake of the Second Sundering.[42]
Velsharoon
Velsharoon was the god of necromancy. He was a mortal who became a deity in 1368 DR.[28] He survived the Spellplague but died in a battle with the Simbul in 1425 DR.[112]

AppendixEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Colin McComb (1996). On Hallowed Ground. (TSR, Inc), p. 168. ISBN 0-7869-0430-5.
  2. Colin McComb (1996). On Hallowed Ground. (TSR, Inc), pp. 37, 160, 168. ISBN 0-7869-0430-5.
  3. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), pp. 3–4. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 23. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  5. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 3. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), pp. 15, 23. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  7. Colin McComb (1996). On Hallowed Ground. (TSR, Inc), p. 38. ISBN 0-7869-0430-5.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Colin McComb (1996). On Hallowed Ground. (TSR, Inc), pp. 37, 168–171, 181. ISBN 0-7869-0430-5.
  9. Eric L. Boyd (1997). Powers and Pantheons. (TSR, Inc), p. 80. ISBN 0-7869-0657-X.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 Eric L. Boyd, Erik Mona (May 2002). Faiths and Pantheons. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 4–5. ISBN 0-7869-2759-3.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 4. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  12. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 37. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  13. Eric L. Boyd (1997). Powers and Pantheons. (TSR, Inc), p. 32. ISBN 0-7869-0657-X.
  14. Sean K. Reynolds, Duane Maxwell, Angel McCoy (August 2001). Magic of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 5–6. ISBN 0-7869-1964-7.
  15. Eric L. Boyd, Erik Mona (May 2002). Faiths and Pantheons. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 74, 85, 98, 104. ISBN 0-7869-2759-3.
  16. Colin McComb (1996). On Hallowed Ground. (TSR, Inc), pp. 38, 168. ISBN 0-7869-0430-5.
  17. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 42. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  18. 18.0 18.1 Troy Denning (July 2003). Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 0-7869-3111-6.
  19. Eric L. Boyd, Erik Mona (May 2002). Faiths and Pantheons. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 36, 124. ISBN 0-7869-2759-3.
  20. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 15. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  21. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), pp. 36, 82, 128, 163. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  22. Eric L. Boyd, Erik Mona (May 2002). Faiths and Pantheons. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 94. ISBN 0-7869-2759-3.
  23. Eric L. Boyd, Erik Mona (May 2002). Faiths and Pantheons. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 58, 109. ISBN 0-7869-2759-3.
  24. Eric L. Boyd, Erik Mona (May 2002). Faiths and Pantheons. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 5. ISBN 0-7869-2759-3.
  25. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), pp. 51, 93. ISBN 978-0786903849.
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