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Fire shuriken was an evocation spell known to the wu jen of Kara-Tur in the 1350s DR, though it was also available to assassins in the 1370s DR. It let them create and hurl shuriken of fire.[4][1][2][3]

EffectsEdit

The spell created spinning pinwheels of magical fire, shaped like shuriken and sharp as a razor. The caster also gained the skill to use these shuriken as well as a trained warrior of the same experience, and they would not burn their hands. With a flick of the caster's hand, they were thrown toward the target, sparks flying off them.[4][1][2][3] On striking, the flames and sharp edges of the early fire shuriken both caused injury or damage, before they dissipated in a puff of multi-colored smoke, which briefly obscured a victim's sight.[4] The later fire shuriken only burned, not cut, and would not set fire to anything flammable.[1][2] Initially, the caster could create one, two, or three fire shuriken as they gained power,[4] but this later increased to nine[1] or to six.[2]

ComponentsEdit

The spell required verbal, somatic and material components. The material component was a tiny shuriken coated in sulfur and pine sap.[4][1][2][3] The somatic component involved quick hand motions.[3]

Known UsersEdit

Fire shuriken was among the spells recorded in the Scrolls of Ha Rahni, written down by the wu jen Ha Rahni between Shou Year 2180 (930 DR) and Shou Year 2212 (962 DR).[5]

Fire shuriken was common among wu jen of the late 1350s DR, being known to the korobokuru wu jen Wutambi,[6] the monkey hengeyokai wu jen Taichi,[7] wu jen agents of T'u Lung,[8] wu jen pirates,[9] and Daisake Mayazato and the wu jen ninja Moonlight, Smoke, and Snake.[10]

Fire shuriken could be cast and hurled at will by lu nat spirits[11][12][13][14] and go-zu oni[15][16][17] and me-zu oni.[17]

AppendixEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 James Wyatt (October 2001). Oriental Adventures (3rd edition). (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 94, 103. ISBN 0-7869-2015-7.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Richard Baker (November 2004). Complete Arcane. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 87, 92, 107. ISBN 0-7869-3435-2.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Matthew Sernett, Jeff Grubb, Mike McArtor (Dec 2005). Spell Compendium. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 92, 245. ISBN 0-7869-3702-5.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 Gary Gygax, David Cook, and François Marcela-Froideval (1985). Oriental Adventures. (TSR, Inc), pp. 73, 79. ISBN 0-8803-8099-3.
  5. Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume I). (TSR, Inc), p. 64. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  6. Jon Pickens and others (1986). Night of the Seven Swords. (TSR, Inc), p. 48. ISBN 0-88038-327-5.
  7. David "Zeb" Cook (1987). Blood of the Yakuza (Encounter Construction Booklet). (TSR, Inc), p. 5. ISBN 0-88038-401-8.
  8. Jeff Grubb (1987). Ochimo: The Spirit Warrior. (TSR, Inc), p. 13. ISBN 0-88038-393-3.
  9. Jeff Grubb (1988). Mad Monkey vs the Dragon Claw. (TSR, Inc), p. 15. ISBN 0-88038-624-X.
  10. Nigel Findley (1990). Ninja Wars. (TSR, Inc), pp. 60, 62, 63. ISBN 0-8803-8895-1.
  11. Gary Gygax, David Cook, and François Marcela-Froideval (1985). Oriental Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 125. ISBN 0-8803-8099-3.
  12. David "Zeb" Cook (1987). Blood of the Yakuza (Encounter Construction Booklet). (TSR, Inc), p. 4. ISBN 0-88038-401-8.
  13. Rick Swan (1989). Test of the Samurai. (TSR, Inc), p. 73. ISBN 0-88038-775-0.
  14. James Wyatt (October 2001). Oriental Adventures (3rd edition). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 177. ISBN 0-7869-2015-7.
  15. Gary Gygax, David Cook, and François Marcela-Froideval (1985). Oriental Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 127. ISBN 0-8803-8099-3.
  16. Jeff Grubb (1988). Mad Monkey vs the Dragon Claw. (TSR, Inc), p. 20. ISBN 0-88038-624-X.
  17. 17.0 17.1 James Wyatt (October 2001). Oriental Adventures (3rd edition). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 180. ISBN 0-7869-2015-7.
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