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Flaming sphere was a conjuration spell that summoned a globe of hot flames, which the caster could then move at a speed roughly equivalent to that of a human. The sphere's flames were volatile and any creature caught nearby that was unable to get out of the way was scorched.[5]

EffectsEdit

The pre-Spellplague version of the sphere lasted for a few minutes, but could last longer the more powerful the caster.[6] Between the Spellplague and the Second Sundering, the sphere dissipated almost immediately after casting on its own, although with a little effort the wizard could maintain the sphere for several minutes or cause it to flare up again. Once the sphere was gone, however, the wizard was unable to reconjure it without substantial rest.[5] The post-Second Sundering version lasted for up to one minute, as long as the caster kept concentrating on the spell.[2]

The sphere burned any flammable material it touched, but did not cause damage by movement, as its surface was spongy. It could not push other objects aside, but it could float over furniture or low walls.[6] If the sphere moved beyond an air envelope into wildspace, it was immediately extinguished. Casting the spell in the phlogiston caused the sphere to immediately detonate at the caster's location.[11]

ComponentsEdit

The spell required verbal, somatic and material components. The materials required were powdered iron, tallow, and brimstone.[6][2]

HistoryEdit

The spell was attributed to Netherese arcanist Primidon in -1967 DR and was originally called Primidon's sphere.[1]

It was considered a druid, sorcerer and wizard spell in the school of evocation prior to the Spellplague, and a wizard spell in the school of conjuration following those events and into the post-Second Sundering era.[6][5][2]

AppendixEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 slade, James Butler (November 1996). Netheril: Empire of Magic (The Winds of Netheril). (TSR, Inc.), pp. 24, 26. ISBN 0-7869-0437-2.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford (2014). Player's Handbook 5th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 207–211, 242. ISBN 978-0-7869-6560-1.
  3. Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford (2014). Player's Handbook 5th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 61. ISBN 978-0-7869-6560-1.
  4. Jeremy Crawford, Mike Mearls, Robert J. Schwalb, Adam Lee, Christopher Perkins, Matt Sernett (November 2017). Xanathar's Guide to Everything. Edited by Kim Mohan. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 54. ISBN 978-0-7869-6612-7.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Rob Heinsoo, Andy Collins, James Wyatt (June 2008). Player's Handbook 4th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 160. ISBN 0-7869-4867-1.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams (July 2003). Player's Handbook 3.5 edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 232. ISBN 0-7869-2886-7.
  7. David "Zeb" Cook (April 1995). Player's Handbook 2nd edition (revised). (TSR, Inc.), p. 182. ISBN 0-7869-0329-5.
  8. Richard Baker (1996). Player's Option: Spells & Magic. (TSR, Inc), p. 183. ISBN 0-7869-0394-5.
  9. Jeff Grubb and Andria Hayday (April 1992). Arabian Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 152. ISBN 978-1560763581.
  10. slade, James Butler (November 1996). Netheril: Empire of Magic (The Winds of Netheril). (TSR, Inc.), p. 121. ISBN 0-7869-0437-2.
  11. Jeff Grubb (August 1989). “Concordance of Arcane Space”. Spelljammer: AD&D Adventures in Space (TSR, Inc.), p. 79. ISBN 0-88038-762-9.