FANDOM


Gnoll was the language of gnolls[1][2] and flinds.[3]

DescriptionEdit

The language was not a complete one, only able to communicate basic concepts. It consisted of cackling, howling, and whining sounds and often relied on gestures and facial expressions. Such words were mixed with a broken version of the Abyssal language, allowing the leaders among them to communicate more complex thoughts.[4]

SpeakersEdit

Gnoll was sometimes spoken as a second language by bugbears,[5] elves[6] (of the Chondalwood, the Forest of Lethyr, and the High Forest[7]), goblins,[8] lizardfolk,[9] orcs,[10] or half-orcs.[10] It was somewhat common as a language in Anauroch, Dambrath, Lapaliiya, the Shaar, Thay, and Thesk.[11] Gnomes of the Great Dale[12] and halflings of Channath, the Chondalwood, and Luiren[13] also occasionally spoke it.

ScriptEdit

Gnoll had no true script or written form, but some gnolls were shrewd enough to write in Abyssal.[4]

HistoryEdit

Gnolls believed that their language was a gift to them from Yeenoghu.[4] Some scholars found the many connections in Gnoll with the Abyssal language to lend evidence to the theory that gnolls had demonic bloodlines.[14]

ExamplesEdit

The following were common names for males in the Gnoll tongue: Brask, Dagnyr, Dhyrn, Doryc, Durrash, Faush, Ghyrryn, Gnasc, Gnoryc, Gnyrn, Hyrn, Lask, Lhoryn, Lhyr, Mognyr, Sorgnyn, Thovarr, Thyrn, Toryc, Wesk, Yrgnyn, and Yrych. Females might be named Amal, Dagnyra, Gnara, Gnora, Gnyrl, Hett, Hyra, Hyrgna, Ishtish, Lhyra, Lhyrl, Malgna, Myrl, Sargna, Senga, Shyrla, Tarnyra, or Yrgna.[2][15] Translations of common Gnoll surnames included Blood-fang, Ear-taker, Face-ripper, and Spear-breaker.[2] Sometimes, Yeenoghu would bless a follower with a special name. A few such names were Aargab, Alark, Andak, Ethak, Eyeth, Ignar, Immor, Oduk, Orrom, Otal, Ulthak, and Ustar.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. Skip Williams, Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook (July 2003). Monster Manual 3.5. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 130. ISBN 0-7869-2893-X.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Richard Baker, Matt Forbeck, Sean K. Reynolds (May 2003). Unapproachable East. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 11. ISBN 0-7869-2881-6.
  3. Andrew Finch, Gwendolyn Kestrel, Chris Perkins (September 2004). Monster Manual III. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 62. ISBN 0-7869-3430-1.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Wizards RPG Team (2016). Volo's Guide to Monsters. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 35–36. ISBN 978-0786966011.
  5. Skip Williams, Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook (July 2003). Monster Manual 3.5. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 29. ISBN 0-7869-2893-X.
  6. Skip Williams, Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook (July 2003). Monster Manual 3.5. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 102. ISBN 0-7869-2893-X.
  7. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 22. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  8. Skip Williams, Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook (July 2003). Monster Manual 3.5. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 134. ISBN 0-7869-2893-X.
  9. Skip Williams, Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook (July 2003). Monster Manual 3.5. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 169. ISBN 0-7869-2893-X.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Skip Williams, Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook (July 2003). Monster Manual 3.5. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 204. ISBN 0-7869-2893-X.
  11. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 11–16. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  12. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 24. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  13. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 26. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  14. Keith Baker (September 2008). “Playing Gnolls”. In Chris Youngs ed. Dragon #367 (Wizards of the Coast), p. 50.
  15. Keith Baker (September 2008). “Playing Gnolls”. In Chris Youngs ed. Dragon #367 (Wizards of the Coast), p. 53.