Goldenfields, nicknamed the the Granary of the North, was a walled abbey to Chauntea of spectacular scope and size. It was the most prolific provider of crops, grains and fruits to the people of the North.[5]

The walled temple-complex featured a small town of several dozen longhouses, an abbey, an inn,[7] a brewery and the vast farms, orchards and gardens for which Goldenfields was famous.[4]

Geography[edit | edit source]

The walls and farms of Goldenfields were built on raised land within the Dessarin Valley[5] that covered over 30 square miles (78 square kilometers).[2]

It was located south of Bargewright Inn, on the western side of the River Dessarin, at the end of the Northfurrow Trail.[8][9]

Government[edit | edit source]

The complex was originally run by its founder, the Chauntean cleric, Tolgar Anuvien.[3]

Sometime during the 14th or 15th centuries DR, Goldenfields came under the influence and sway of the Emerald Enclave. Its members were just as welcome within as faithful Chauntean clergy.[5]

Trade[edit | edit source]

The vast farms of Goldenfields grew a number of grains including rice, corn, barley and hops. It had apple and orange orchards along with a number of herb and vegetable gardens. The latter of these cultivated a number of root vegetables including carrots, onions, potatoes and others such as tomatoes and squash.[4]

It featured a number of livestock paddocks where oxen and cattle were allowed to graze. Smaller pens housed sheep, pigs, turkey and chickens.[10]

Goldenfields provided much of the food consumed in Waterdeep and the neighboring settlements,[3][5] but did not seek payment in return. They donated this food to others in honor of Chauntea.[2]

Defenses[edit | edit source]

The lands around Goldenfields were well patrolled by well-armed Chauntean priests.[1]

The complex was encircled by a massive wall constructed from mortared stone. It was 60 feet (18 meters) tall from the outside, 20 feet (6.1 meters) tall from the elevated inside, and 30 feet (9.1 meters) wide nearly all around. Stone towers and barracks were constructed on the walls, about 1​ to ​2 miles (1.6​ to ​3.2 kilometers) apart from one another.[5]

History[edit | edit source]

The settlement was founded as an abbey around the Year of the Serpent, 1359 DR by Tolgar Anuvien. In a few years time Goldenfields grew into a massive fortified farmland.[2]

Notable Locations[edit | edit source]

Inhabitants[edit | edit source]

The temple-complex was home to over 5,000 individuals.[3] It was tended to by Chauntean clergy and protected by vigilant guardsmen, hired adventurers and treants of the Emerald Enclave.[5]

Notable Residents[edit | edit source]

14th Century
15th Century

Rumors and Legends[edit | edit source]

Local rumors stated that Chauntea herself was quite proud of Goldenfields and had a personal hand in its growth and defense.[note 1][12]

History[edit | edit source]

The complex was founded shortly before the Year of the Harp, 1355 DR, by Tolgar Anuvien, one of the Crazed Venturers who hailed from nearby Waterdeep. In the following decade it grew to be the largest "temple" dedicated to Chauntea.[1]

By the Year of the Tankard, 1370 DR, Goldenfields had grown from 20 square miles (52 square kilometers)[1] to nearly 30 square miles (78 square kilometers), and its population rose to nearly 8,000 individuals.[note 2][2]

In the late 15th century DR, some time after the War of the Silver Marches, Goldenfields was assaulted by a band of Guh, her tribe of hill giants and their allied goblinoid forces.[4][13]

Appendix[edit | edit source]

Gallery[edit | edit source]

Goldenfields.jpg
IronRoad.png

Notes[edit | edit source]

  1. Page 45 of Volo's Guide to the North erroneously refers Chauntea as "he".
  2. Volo's Guide to the North and the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition show linear growth in the size of Goldenfields, from 20 to 30 square miles. Storm King's Thunder states the farmlands take up "more than" 20 square miles, which is technically true.

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 43. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 176. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 44. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 48. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 44. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  6. Michele Carter, Stacy Janssen eds. (2015). Princes of the Apocalypse. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 33. ISBN 978-0786965786.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 47. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  8. Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 33. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  9. Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 45. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 46. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  11. Eric L. Boyd (June 2005). City of Splendors: Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 54. ISBN 0-7869-3693-2.
  12. Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 45. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  13. Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 49. ISBN 978-0786966004.
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