The Greypeak Mountains, also called simply Greypeaks,[3][4] was a rugged and desolate mountain range in the eastern end of the Savage Frontier in the North.[1][5][9][10] The perilous peaks were famous for being exceptionally hard to traverse, home to many fearsome beasts, monstrous humanoids, and even aberrant beings that inspired terror in wary travelers.[6] For all their danger, the Greypeaks once housed great deposits of mineral wealth, much if not all of which was recovered by men during the Golden Age of Humanity.[11]

Description[edit | edit source]

Paths and trails across the range's mountainsides were quite precarious, appearing as little more than rocky shelves barely wide enough for man or steed.[9]

The range of peaks formed a massive bowl of sorts that encircled what could be described as a massive bog-forest. Rather than forming a freshwater body within the ring of mountains, water mixed with eroded mountainside to form an morass of wet earth and wavering trees that appeared to float within the sinking ground.[9]

Climate[edit | edit source]

The weather was generally pretty poor throughout the mountains.[1] The caps of the mountains were covered in snow and ice;[7] freezing raid falling down the eastern slopes of the Greypeaks formed the Frozen Sea region of western Anauroch.[12]

Geography[edit | edit source]

The mountains were bordered by the Marsh of Chelimber and the Forgotten Forest to the south, the Lonely Moor and Fallen Lands to the east and northeast respectively,[1] the Gray Vale and Delimbiyr Vale to the west and southwest,[2][6][13][7] and the Backlands of the Heartlands to the south.[14]

Geographic Features[edit | edit source]

Back during the Days of Thunder, the Narrow Seas ran along the mountains' eastern slopes.[15] As of the Present Age, two rivers emerged from the Greypeak Mountains: the Grayflow in the south and the Loagrann (from three tributaries) in the north.[16]

Deep within the mounts rest the Realm of Stone and Shadow, a network of caverns and subterranean passageways dug out by dwarves from an ages-old kingdom.[17]

The summit of Mount Hlim was located among the southern peaks of the mountains.[18]

History[edit | edit source]

During the Age of the Proud Peoples,[19] the Greypeak Mountains were home to the Ammarindar kingdom of dwarves. The dwarven realm thrived for some time, until it was abandoned rather abruptly in the 9th century DR.[20]

The people of the town of Llorkh once mined for iron and silver in the Greypeaks. Their shallow tunnels riddled the mountains north and east of the town. These were old and almost worked-out, their lodes nearly exhausted, by the mid–14th century DR, but some miners still persisted in working there.[21][22][23][24][25] After the takeover of the town the following year, the Lord's Men commandeered three worked-out mine tunnels near Llorkh to use for storage. It was told that monsters made their lairs in several other tunnels, making them hazardous.[23][25]

By the Year of Shadows, 1358 DR, a garrison of thirty Lord's Men from Llorkh stood guard at Dawn Pass. They remained there through to at least the next twelve years, aided by a hired beholder from Dekanter, together with its gnoll minions.[6][26][27]

A decade later in the Year of the Banner, 1368 DR, many goblins were driven from their homes in the mountains by the horrific acts taken by the Beast Lord in Dekanter. They went fleeing for settlements near the mountains, such as Parnast to the west.[28]

As of the late 15th century DR, the mountains were rumored to hold caches of treasure stashed away by the Cult of the Dragon.[29]

Notable Locations[edit | edit source]

Paths & Trails
Landmarks
Settlements

Inhabitants[edit | edit source]

In the 14th century DR, many monsters inhabited the range including goblins that dwelt in keeps, along with their allied barghest chieftains that commanded large packs of worgs,[1] orcs,[6][39] galeb duhr,[8] a hive of beholders,[40][41] and many young dragons,[1] including at least one family of red dragons.[42][page needed]

The easternmost peaks of the mountains were said to house the greatest known population of griffons in all the Realms.[6] Giant owls were also known to make their nests within the tallest of the Greypeak's mountains.[33]

The Greypeaks were named after the grey-skinned stone giants that lived within and amongst the mountains.[2] While they were seen as "partly civilized" to outsiders, having enough care not to openly assault travelers that merely passed by,[1] they in fact had a rich culture centered around strongly-held spiritual beliefs.[43] Cloud giant castles were known to float over the Greypeaks, especially in the skies above the eastern peaks.[6][44]

Notable Inhabitants[edit | edit source]

Appendix[edit | edit source]

Appearances[edit | edit source]

Adventures
Storm King's Thunder
Novels
The Nether ScrollThe Summoning
Organized Play & Licensed Adventures
Storm King's Thunder: (Treasure of the Broken Hoard, The Black Road)
Referenced only
Uninvited GuestsGiant DiplomacyParnast Under Siege

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 169, 174. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 86. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Steven E. Schend, Sean K. Reynolds and Eric L. Boyd (June 2000). Cloak & Dagger. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 28. ISBN 0-7869-1627-3.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 96. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Map of Interior, Silverymoon, Longsaddle, and Yartar included in slade, et al. (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier. Edited by James Butler. (TSR, Inc.). ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8 slade, et al. (April 1996). “The Wilderness”. In James Butler ed. The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (TSR, Inc.), p. 63. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Rob Heinsoo, Logan Bonner, Robert J. Schwalb (September 2008). Forgotten Realms Player's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 100. ISBN 978-0-7869-4929-8.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Shawn Merwin (2016). Treasure of the Broken Hoard (DDAL05-01) (PDF). Edited by Claire Hoffman, Travis Woodall. D&D Adventurers League: Storm King's Thunder (Wizards of the Coast), p. 14.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 Lynn Abbey (September 2000). The Nether Scroll. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 125–126. ISBN 0-7869-1566-8.
  10. Wolfgang Baur, Steve Winter (August 2014). Hoard of the Dragon Queen. Edited by Miranda Horner. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 62. ISBN 978-0786965649.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 105–106. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  12. Ed Greenwood, Eric L. Boyd, Darrin Drader (July 2004). Serpent Kingdoms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 96. ISBN 0-7869-3277-5.
  13. Ed Greenwood and Jason Carl (July 2002). Silver Marches. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 22. ISBN 0-7869-2835-2.
  14. Ed Greenwood (1994). Volo's Guide to the Sword Coast. (TSR, Inc), p. 123. ISBN 1-5607-6940-1.
  15. Ed Greenwood, Eric L. Boyd, Darrin Drader (July 2004). Serpent Kingdoms. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 96, 98. ISBN 0-7869-3277-5.
  16. Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 214. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  17. 17.0 17.1 Eric L. Boyd, Eytan Bernstein (August 2006). Dragons of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 43. ISBN 0-7869-3923-0.
  18. Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 139. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  19. Brian R. James, Ed Greenwood (September 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. Edited by Kim Mohan, Penny Williams. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 27. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  20. Ed Greenwood (October 1990). Dwarves Deep. (TSR, Inc.), p. 52. ISBN 0-88038-880-3.
  21. Ed Greenwood (1987). Waterdeep and the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 7. ISBN 0-88038-490-5.
  22. Jennell Jaquays (1988). The Savage Frontier. (TSR, Inc), p. 30. ISBN 0-88038-593-6.
  23. 23.0 23.1 Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 213. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  24. Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). “Campaign Guide”. City of Splendors (TSR, Inc), p. 17. ISBN 0-5607-6868-1.
  25. 25.0 25.1 slade, et al. (April 1996). “Cities & Civilization”. In James Butler ed. The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (TSR, Inc.), p. 61. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  26. 26.0 26.1 Jennell Jaquays (1988). The Savage Frontier. (TSR, Inc), p. 46. ISBN 0-88038-593-6.
  27. 27.0 27.1 Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 44. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  28. Lynn Abbey (September 2000). The Nether Scroll. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 40. ISBN 0-7869-1566-8.
  29. 29.0 29.1 Shawn Merwin (2016). Treasure of the Broken Hoard (DDAL05-01) (PDF). Edited by Claire Hoffman, Travis Woodall. D&D Adventurers League: Storm King's Thunder (Wizards of the Coast), p. 6.
  30. Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 80. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  31. Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 44. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  32. Wolfgang Baur, Steve Winter (August 2014). Hoard of the Dragon Queen. Edited by Miranda Horner. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 63. ISBN 978-0786965649.
  33. 33.0 33.1 Shawn Merwin (2016). Treasure of the Broken Hoard (DDAL05-01) (PDF). Edited by Claire Hoffman, Travis Woodall. D&D Adventurers League: Storm King's Thunder (Wizards of the Coast), p. 30.
  34. Jeff Crook, Wil Upchurch, Eric L. Boyd (May 2005). Champions of Ruin. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 99. ISBN 0-7869-3692-4.
  35. Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 81. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  36. Robert Alaniz (2016). Uninvited Guests (DDAL5-03) (PDF). Edited by Claire Hoffman, Travis Woodall. D&D Adventurers League: Storm King's Thunder (Wizards of the Coast), p. 6.
  37. Ed Greenwood (1994). Volo's Guide to the Sword Coast. (TSR, Inc), p. 139. ISBN 1-5607-6940-1.
  38. >Ed Greenwood and Doug Stewart (1997). Prayers from the Faithful. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 90. ISBN 0-7869-0682-0.
  39. slade, et al. (April 1996). “The Wilderness”. In James Butler ed. The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (TSR, Inc.), p. 14. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  40. Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 40. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  41. Eric L. Boyd (June 2005). City of Splendors: Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 13. ISBN 0-7869-3693-2.
  42. Lynn Abbey (September 2000). The Nether Scroll. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 0-7869-1566-8.
  43. 43.0 43.1 Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 152–153. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  44. Paige Leitman, Ben Heisler (2016). The Black Road (DDAL5-02) (PDF). Edited by Claire Hoffman, Travis Woodall. D&D Adventurers League: Storm King's Thunder (Wizards of the Coast), p. 10.
  45. Dale Donovan (January 1998). Cult of the Dragon. (TSR, Inc), p. 54. ISBN 0-7869-0709-6.
  46. Ed Greenwood and Jason Carl (July 2002). Silver Marches. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 41. ISBN 0-7869-2835-2.
  47. Eric L. Boyd, Eytan Bernstein (August 2006). Dragons of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 152. ISBN 0-7869-3923-0.
  48. Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 103. ISBN 978-0786966004.
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