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The High Forest orcs were a culture of mountain orcs dwelling in and around the High Forest in northwest Faerûn in the mid-to-late 14th century DR.[1][2]

Homeland

The orcs lived in small villages and underground tunnels in the High Forest, located around two days' journey from the forest's edge.[1][2]

Abilities

Owing to their woodland environment, the High Forest orcs were skilled in forestry similar to rangers.[1][2]

Dress

They often wore earrings fashioned of bronze in a distinctive style.[3]

Weapons

They were known to craft daggers of distinctive make.[3]

Religion

The High Forest orcs' holy symbol of Herne Hurkgruum.

Instead of the typical orc pantheon, these orcs venerated a god of hunting named Herne, whom they knew as the Wild Hunter or Herne Hurkgruum.[1][2][4] For his holy symbol, they used a single antler, usually drawn as a stylized pictograph[4] or made of wood.[3] Orc shamans of Herne commanded the spells of druids and even sprouted stag antlers from their heads.[1][2]

Relations

The High Forest orcs counted rangers of the humans, elves, and half-elves of the region as their greatest enemies. They were not particular foes of goblinoids.[1][2] They faced suspicion and even open fear and hatred in cities like Loudwater.[5]

History

From late spring of the Year of Wild Magic, 1372 DR, High Forest orcs began leaving their homeland in great numbers and moving eastward to the Graypeak Mountains, in an exodus known as the Gray Migrations. Loudwater's citizenry were consternated and supposed the appearance of the City of Shade over the Dire Wood had scared the orcs, that there was a disease in the area, or that they were fleeing something or someone.[6][7][5][8] Despite the fear and chaos, the orcs avoided settlements and violence and the majority of migrations were peaceful; conflicts and deaths were few, but notorious.[7][5][8] A story went around that a Loudwater patrol had found five families in a homestead east of Orlbar massacred by orcs and their homes destroyed, that the orcs had taken nothing and done it for kicks.[5] Another version had only two families killed and all their animals, including the cats.[8] Because of such stories, Blaz Merrymar believed the orcs killed his sons and nephews, when it was most likely bandits of the Hark. Local paladins, rangers, Scions of the Green Regent, the Red Fellowship, and even some orcs themselves voluntarily patrolled the roads to keep the peace.[5]

Tribes

They included a number of tribes:

Appendix

Appearances

Organized Play & Licensed Adventures
Gray HuntEpidemicRat's Bastard

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 Jennell Jaquays (1988). The Savage Frontier. (TSR, Inc), p. 27. ISBN 0-88038-593-6.
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 slade, et al. (April 1996). “Cities & Civilization”. In James Butler ed. The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (TSR, Inc.), p. 14. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Ving Domanski, Stephen Radney-MacFarland (2004). Rat's Bastard (PDF). Legacy of the Green Regent (Wizards of the Coast), p. 19.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Ed Greeley (2003). Gray Hunt (PDF). Legacy of the Green Regent (Wizards of the Coast), p. 9.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 Stephen Radney-MacFarland (2003). Extermination (PDF). Legacy of the Green Regent (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 4–5, 6, 22.
  6. Stephen Radney-MacFarland (2003-05-30). The Legacy Begins. Legacy of the Green Regent. Wizards of the Coast. Archived from the original on 2021-04-12. Retrieved on 2021-09-03.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Eric Menge & Stephen Radney-MacFarland (2003-07-17). What is the Green Regent. Legacy of the Green Regent. Wizards of the Coast. Archived from the original on 2016-11-01. Retrieved on 2021-09-03.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 Ed Greeley (2003). Gray Hunt (PDF). Legacy of the Green Regent (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 3, 4.
  9. Ed Greeley (2003). Gray Hunt (PDF). Legacy of the Green Regent (Wizards of the Coast).
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