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Hillsfar was a powerful city-state located on the southern coast of the Moonsea. The city was heavily involved in trade in the region, acting as a hub for cities and settlements in the surrounding area.[4] A person from Hillsfar was known as a Hillfarian.[5]

Government[]

Laws[]

In the late 14th century DR, the city of Hillsfar was ruled by the iron fist of the wizard Maalthiir and there were two standing "great laws":[6]

  • Great Law of Trade: Do not interfere with any legitimate trade;
  • Great Law of Humanity: Only humans are allowed within Hillsfar.[6]

By the late 15th century DR, the city was ruled by a senate of thirty-one wealthy merchants and guildmasters. However, since the senate could rarely agree on anything, actual rule of the city fell to the First Lord Torin Nomerthal.[2]

Defense[]

A Red Plume of Hillsfar.

Main article: Red Plumes

Although Hillsfar was a walled city, fortified with a steel gate,[7] it was the military force of the Red Plumes who ensured the city's security from foreign forces in the 14th century DR. Although they technically operated autonomously, they were in fact another extension of Maalthiir's reach.[8]

In the 15th century DR, the military was known as the Tower Guard and was supplemented by a powerful mages guild.[2]

Trade[]

Although trade in the Moonsea was typically carried out through rivalries and competition, almost all the goods of the region passed through Hillsfar in the hands of middlemen and intermediary merchants.[7]

History[]

The settlement was founded in 673 DR by elves, half-elves, and humans on the western edge of Tailings Bay. It was originally named Hillsafar after a dwarf clan, but within a few decades, the name was simplified to Hillsfar.[9]

Hillsfar was once under the extended rule of the Elven Court but in 1357 DR[10] Maalthiir overthrew their representatives using blackmail and fear of violence. He then declared himself the First Lord, a position with absolute military power, which he retained through the violent mercenary group known as the Red Plumes. Extending his own xenophobic tendencies, Maalthiir then banned all non-humans from the city.[6] The Red Plume mercenaries were especially hard on the halfling population, considering them all thieves. Every single halfling was thrown out of the city with extreme prejudice. The Mercenaries came for them in the middle of the night, forcing the halflings out without a chance to bring the valuables or sell their land and businesses. This event gave the Red Plumes the name of Red Death among the halfling folk.[11]

In 1369 DR, a pool of radiance emerged in Hillsfar's harbor, starting to aggressively consume lives of the city's residents[12]. The spawn pool originated from the ruined city of Myth Drannor where it was corrupted and abused by the Cult of the Dragon. Kya Mordrayn's cult cell spread tentacles of her corrupted pool, feeding it in cities across the Moonsea, empowering it. Subsequently the Cult's plans were shattered and its leaders slain by the Veiled Ones. With the main pool of radiance gone, Hillsfar was saved.[13]

Appendix[]

Appearances[]

Adventures
Bane of the TradewaysBlood Above, Blood BelowDeath on the WallHarried in HillsfarHillsfar ReclaimedShackles of BloodThe Waydown
Card Games
AD&D Trading Cards
Video Games
Hillsfar

References[]

  1. Ed Greenwood (August 1992). “The Everwinking Eye: Words To The Wise”. In Jean Rabe ed. Polyhedron #74 (TSR, Inc.), p. 14–15.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Edited by Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 150. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  3. Darrin Drader, Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. Edited by John Thompson, Gary Sarli. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 47–49. ISBN 978-0-7869-3915-2.
  4. Darrin Drader, Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. Edited by John Thompson, Gary Sarli. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 46. ISBN 978-0-7869-3915-2.
  5. Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood (1990). Forgotten Realms Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 73. ISBN 0-8803-8828-5.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Darrin Drader, Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. Edited by John Thompson, Gary Sarli. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 47. ISBN 978-0-7869-3915-2.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Darrin Drader, Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. Edited by John Thompson, Gary Sarli. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 49. ISBN 978-0-7869-3915-2.
  8. Darrin Drader, Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. Edited by John Thompson, Gary Sarli. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 48. ISBN 978-0-7869-3915-2.
  9. Brian R. James, Ed Greenwood (September 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. Edited by Kim Mohan, Penny Williams. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 96. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  10. Brian R. James, Ed Greenwood (September 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. Edited by Kim Mohan, Penny Williams. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 142. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  11. Jeff Grubb, Kate Novak (October 1988). Azure Bonds. (TSR, Inc.), p. 205. ISBN 0-88038-612-6.
  12. Carrie Bebris (2001). Pool of Radiance: Ruins of Myth Drannor. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 110. ISBN 0-7869-1387-8.
  13. Stormfront Studios (2001). Designed by Mark Buchignani, Ken Eklund, Sarah W. Stocker. Pool of Radiance: Ruins of Myth Drannor. Ubisoft Entertainment.

Gallery[]

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