Holy water was water blessed by a good deity[3] that could damage undead and evil outsiders.[1] Evil clerics could create a similar substance called unholy water.[4]

The priests of Helm called holy water the "Tears of Helm".[5]

Properties[edit | edit source]

Holy water was infused with positive energy, which gave it its properties.[3] Unholy water, in contrast, was imbued with negative energy.[4]

Applications[edit | edit source]

Holy water acted much like acid against undead creatures and evil beings from other planes. If contained in a flask, it could be thrown as a grenade weapon against corporeal creatures, or it could be splashed or poured on incorporeal ones.[1] Unholy water instead damaged good outsiders.[4]

Holy water was used in the powerful resurrection spell, as part of the ceremony to restore life to the dead.[6]

Some users employed an instrument known as an aspergillum to spray holy water.[7][8] A larger version of an aspergillum, the heavy aspergillum, was also used as a weapon.[9]

Production[edit | edit source]

To create a flask of holy water required the flask of water, five pounds (2.3 kilograms) of powdered silver, and the ability to bless water. The process took one minute per flask.[3] The procedure was equivalent for unholy water, except that the water was cursed instead.

Temples dedicated to good deities usually sold holy water at cost to those who needed a defense against evil.[1]

Variations[edit | edit source]

Elven holy water was blessed by the god Rillifane Rallathil and often used when fighting against vampires.[10][11]

Notable Users[edit | edit source]

Rumors & Legends[edit | edit source]

The plane of Celestia was said to contain an infinitely large sea of holy water from which Mount Celestia emerged.[14]

Appendix[edit | edit source]

Appearances[edit | edit source]

Novels
Cormyr: A Novel
Fiction
"Into the Nest of Vipers", Dungeon #75
Video Games
Baldur's Gate II: Shadows of AmnBaldur's Gate II: Throne of BhaalNeverwinter Nights: Shadows of Undrentide

External links[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams (July 2003). Player's Handbook v.3.5. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 129. ISBN 0-7869-2886-7.
  2. BioWare, Floodgate Entertainment (June 2003). Designed by Brent Knowles, Rick Ernst. Neverwinter Nights: Shadows of Undrentide. Atari.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams (July 2003). Player's Handbook v.3.5. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 205. ISBN 0-7869-2886-7.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams (July 2003). Player's Handbook v.3.5. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 216. ISBN 0-7869-2886-7.
  5. Ed Greenwood and Jeff Grubb (April 1998). Cormyr: A Novel (Paperback). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 302. ISBN ISBN 0-7869-0710-X.
  6. Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams (July 2003). Player's Handbook v.3.5. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 273. ISBN 0-7869-2886-7.
  7. Jeff Grubb, Julia Martin, Steven E. Schend et al (1992). Aurora's Whole Realms Catalogue. (TSR, Inc), p. 31. ISBN 0-5607-6327-2.
  8. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 95. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  9. Reynolds, Forbeck, Jacobs, Boyd (March 2003). Races of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 91. ISBN 0-7869-2875-1.
  10. BioWare (September 2000). Designed by James Ohlen, Kevin Martens. Baldur's Gate II: Shadows of Amn. Black Isle Studios.
  11. BioWare (June 2001). Designed by Kevin Martens. Baldur's Gate II: Throne of Bhaal. Black Isle Studios.
  12. Matthew G. Adkins (July 1999). “Into the Nest of Vipers”. Dungeon #75 (Wizards of the Coast), p. 66.
  13. Dale Donovan, Paul Culotta (August 1996). Heroes' Lorebook. (TSR, Inc), p. 24. ISBN 0-7869-0412-7.
  14. Jeff Grubb, Bruce R. Cordell, David Noonan (September 2001). Manual of the Planes 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 132. ISBN 0-7869-1850-8.
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