Incarnates were sentient embodiments of the energy of abstract principles.[2]

Description[edit | edit source]

Incarnates were invisible to other creatures, but if viewed through magical means they appeared to be multi-colored balls of light. Each was composed of the living energy of a certain abstract principle, such as evil, anger, courage, hope, etc.[2]

Abilities[edit | edit source]

All incarnates possessed an immunity to harm from fire, cold, and electricity. All were capable of draining creatures of their constitution by touching them, inducing feelings of weakness in both their victim's body and mind. When the constitution of a creature was completely drained away an incarnate could attempt to take over their victim. Afterwards, a creature's constitution would gradually return to them. The creature's alignment would also immediately, though only temporarily, change to match that of the incarnate possessing them.[3]

Once in control of their body, an incarnate could use its host however it desired — actions, speech, spellcasting, etc. They also developed a telepathic with them, allowing the host and incarnate to communicate, and provided their hosts with varied unique abilities. One ability that all incarnates provided their hosts was an immunity to mind-affecting spells.[3]

While inside them a host acted as a buffer between incarnates and enemies, with all attacks against them merely harming the host's body and not the incarnate. In addition, while possessed by an incarnate a creature could not be taken over by others incarnates, spirits such as ghosts and haunts, nor be affected by magic jar.[3]

Only the death of a host and certain spells could drive an incarnate out from a body. Minor incarnates could be driven out by the spells dispel good or dispel evil and limited wish. Major incarnates could only be driven out from a host by means of exaction, holy word or unholy word, and wish.[3]

Species[edit | edit source]

There were over sixteen types of incarnates, divided into two classifications, major and minor, which could be divided between the alignment spectrums of good and evil.[4] They could be found across much of the Outer Planes, but gravitated towards planes and planar layers that suited their temperaments and particular alignment.[2]

Good-aligned incarnates rarely attempted to interfere with the behavior of their hosts and avoided taking over creatures that would be harmed by their presence. While evil-aligned incarnates had no such concerns or scruples, caring only that they get as much energy as possible from their host.[3]

Major[edit | edit source]

Within the major classification there were only two types of incarnates, a good and an evil.[4] They could not possess weak creatures without destroying them in the process, the power of their pure energy causing the creature's body to incinerate.[3]

Good Incarnate
These were the major incarnate that preferred to only take over lawful good creatures, such as some clerics, paladins, gold dragons, and silver dragons. They lived in a synergistic relationship with their host, making them stronger and more charismatic. They also granted their hosts the abilities of detect evil and protection from evil in a 20 feet (6.1 meters) radius, which were always active, as well as turn undead. They dwelled in Mount Celestia, primarily on the layer of Chronias. They could sometimes be found on the layers of Jovar, Mertion, and and Solania. On this plane they solely inhabited tome archons and sword archons.[3]
Evil Incarnate
These were the major incarnate of chaotic evil. They had no preference in the alignment of their host, instead desiring those in positions of powers. They lived in a synergistic relationship with their host, making them stronger and more charismatic. They also granted their hosts the abilities of detect good and protection from good in a 10 feet (3 meters) radius, which were always active, as well as control undead and turn paladin. They dwelled within the darkest, most vile layers of the Abyss.[3]

Minor[edit | edit source]

Within the minor classification there were over fourteen types, divided between the alignment spectrums of good and evil. They were both liable to take neutrally aligned creatures as hosts, but would abandon them as soon as possible for someone more appropriate.[4] Minor evil incarnates particularly preferred good-aligned hosts, taking enjoyment in forcing them to commit abhorrent and reprehensible acts.[5]

Minor Incarnates[edit | edit source]

Good Minor Incarnates[edit | edit source]

Charity Incarnate
Incarnates composed of the pure, living energy of the abstract principle of charity. Creatures possessed by them were more charismatic and wise. Their host also became immune to the envy, greed, and the rage experienced by berserkers. They would abandon any host that failed to spare the life of a surrendering foe.[3]
Courage Incarnate
Incarnates composed of the pure, living energy of the abstract principle of courage. Creatures possessed by them were more charismatic, had greater endurance, and became fearless — though not reckless. Their host also became immune to magically induced fear. They would abandon their host if their alignment changed to evil.[3]
Faith Incarnate
Incarnates composed of the pure, living energy of the abstract principle of faith. They only took paladins and lawful good clerics as hosts. Creatures possessed by them were stronger, more charismatic, and wiser. Their host also became immune to magically induced changes in their alignment.[3]
Hope Incarnate
Incarnates composed of the pure, living energy of the abstract principle of hope. They were the most numerous of all the minor good incarnates. Creatures possessed by them were more charismatic, as well as immune to despair and hopelessness.[3]
Justice Incarnate
Incarnates composed of the pure, living energy of the abstract principle of justice. They were the least numerous of all the minor good incarnates. Creatures possessed by them were more charismatic, intelligent, and wise. They would abandon their host if they took any unjust action — this includes such things as cheating, lack of fair play, and stealing.[5]
Temperance Incarnate
Incarnates composed of the pure, living energy of the abstract principle of temperance. They never took evil-aligned hosts. Creatures possessed by them became more resistant — though not immune — to the spells charm confusion, emotion, fear, spook, symbol, and taunt.[5]
Wisdom Incarnate
Incarnates composed of the pure, living energy of the abstract principle of wisdom. They typically never took evil-aligned hosts, only doing so as a last resort. Creatures possessed by them were more wise.[5]

Evil Minor Incarnates[edit | edit source]

Anger Incarnate
Incarnates composed of the pure, living energy of the abstract principle of anger. Creatures possessed by them became stronger, but less intelligent and charismatic. Tame or timid creatures became prone to sudden bouts of rage, during which they would try to kill anything close by.[5]
Covetousness Incarnate
Incarnates composed of the pure, living energy of the abstract principle of desire. Creatures possessed by them became less charismatic and wise. Their hosts also developed a sort of "gold fever" and became more miserly in their behavior.[5]
Envy Incarnate
Incarnates composed of the pure, living energy of the abstract principle of envy. Unlike many incarnates, the creatures possessed by them did not display any obvious signs of possession. Their hosts were made to plot slow, devious campaigns of slander and rumor against their associates. Their hosts were perpetually jealous of the abilities and treasures of others. Their hosts would try to covertly have such treasures become lost, ruined, or outright destroyed.[5]
Gluttony Incarnate
Incarnates composed of the pure, living energy of the abstract principle of gluttony. Creatures possessed by them became less charismatic and wise. Their hosts also gained 6‒14 lb (2.7‒6.4 kg) per week, becoming overindulgent with food and drink. Their hosts were driven to beg, borrow, and even steal in order to obtain food.[5]
Lust Incarnate
Incarnates composed of the pure, living energy of the abstract principle of lust. Creatures possessed by them became more charismatic, but less intelligent and wise. Their hosts was subjected to a desperate feeling unfulfilled desire.[5]
Pride Incarnate
Incarnates composed of the pure, living energy of the abstract principle of pride. Creatures possessed by them became less charismatic, intelligent, and wise. Their hosts were made to arrogant, conceited, and vain to an extreme degree. Consequently, their hosts tended to treat everyone around them as servants and get angry at any who failed to act servile.[5]
Sloth Incarnate
Incarnates composed of the pure, living energy of the abstract principle of desire. Creatures possessed by them became less strong, dexterous, and wise. Their hosts were made to behave carelessly and lazy, neglecting their duties and equipment. Wizards were liable to stop memorizing spells, while priests were liable to neglect their usual prayers and meditations.[5]

Society[edit | edit source]

Incarnates were attracted to energy sources similar to their own substance. Such as angry individuals attracting anger incarnates and courageous individuals attracting courage incarnates.[2]

Diet[edit | edit source]

Incarnates fed upon the pure energy given off by hosts expressing abstract principles similar to their own substance.[2]

Homelands[edit | edit source]

Good Minor Incarnates
Incarnates of courage, faith, and hope could be found all across the Upper planes,[3] such as the Beldaari region of Mount Celestia.[6] Incarnates of charity particularly inhabited the planes of Bytopia and Mount Celestia.[3] Incarnates of justice and wisdom also inhabited the plane of Mount Celestia. Finally, incarnates of temperance could occasionally be found on Mount Celestia and the Beastlands, but primarily inhabited Mechanus.[5]
Evil Minor Incarnates
Incarnates of anger, envy, gluttony, and sloth could be found all across the Lower planes. Incarnates of covetousness particularly inhabited the planes of Gehenna and the Gray Waste. Incarnates of lust inhabited the Abyss, while incarnates of pride inhabited Baator.[5]

Relationships[edit | edit source]

Incarnates of both alignment spectrums served a wide variety of deities and pantheons all across the Realms:

Dark Seldarine
Within the drow pantheon only the goddess Eilistraee favored incarnates as servants, these being incarnates of hope and faith.[7]
Faerûnian pantheon
Within the major pantheon of Faerun only seven gods were known to favor incarnates as servants. The death god Bane was served by incarnates of pride.[8] Incarnates of wisdom served Deneir.[9] Incarnates of justice served Hoar.[10] Incarnates of courage served Ilmater.[11] Incarnates of courage, hope, temperance, and wisdom served Lurue.[12] Incarnates of courage, faith, and hope served Mystra.[13] Nobanion was served by major incarnates of good, as well as minor incarnates of courage, faith, justice, temperance, and wisdom.[14]
Lords of the Golden Hills
Within the gnome pantheon only two deities favored incarnates as servants. Gaerdal Ironhand was served by incarnates of courage and faith.[15] While Urdlen was served by incarnates of covetousness, envy, gluttony, lust, and sloth.[16]
Morndinsamman
Most of the deities within the dwarven pantheon favored incarnates as servants. Abbathor was served by incarnates of covetousness.[17] Incarnates of charity, faith, and justice served Berronar Truesilver.[18] Incarnates of courage, faith, and justice served Clangeddin Silverbeard.[19] Incarnates of courage and faith served Gorm Gulthyn.[20] Incarnates of courage served Haela Brightaxe.[21] Incarnates of faith served Moradin.[22] Incarnates of hope, temperance, and wisdom served Sharindlar.[23] And finally, incarnates of anger and pride served both of the duergar deities, Deep Duerra and Laduguer.[24]
Mulhorandi pantheon
In the pantheon of Mulhorand, only the deity Osiris favored incarnates as servants. He was served by major incarnates of good, as well as minor incarnates of faith and justice.[25]
Seldarine
Within the elven pantheon only four deities favored incarnates as servants. Corellon employed the greatest variety of incarnates — those of charity, courage, faith, hope, justice, temperance, and wisdom.[26] Incarnates of faith, hope, justice, and wisdom served Labelas Enoreth.[27] Incarnates of faith and hope served Sehanine Moonbow.[28] Incarnates of courage served Solonor Thelandira.[29]
Yondalla's Children
within the halfling pantheon only three deities favored incarnates as servants. The goddess Arvoreen was served by incarnates of courage, faith, and justice.[30] While the goddesses Cyrrollalee and Yondalla were both served by incarnates of charity, faith, and justice.[31]

Appendix[edit | edit source]

Appearances[edit | edit source]

Adventures
Doors to the Unknown

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Allen Varney, ed. (June 1994). Planescape Monstrous Compendium Appendix. (TSR, Inc.), pp. 58–60. ISBN 978-1560768623.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Allen Varney, ed. (June 1994). Planescape Monstrous Compendium Appendix. (TSR, Inc.), p. 58. ISBN 978-1560768623.
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 Allen Varney, ed. (June 1994). Planescape Monstrous Compendium Appendix. (TSR, Inc.), p. 59. ISBN 978-1560768623.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Allen Varney, ed. (June 1994). Planescape Monstrous Compendium Appendix. (TSR, Inc.), pp. 58–59. ISBN 978-1560768623.
  5. 5.00 5.01 5.02 5.03 5.04 5.05 5.06 5.07 5.08 5.09 5.10 5.11 5.12 Allen Varney, ed. (June 1994). Planescape Monstrous Compendium Appendix. (TSR, Inc.), p. 60. ISBN 978-1560768623.
  6. Bill Slavicsek (1996). Doors to the Unknown. Edited by Cindi M. Rice. (TSR, Inc), pp. 60–61. ISBN 078690447X.
  7. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 14. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  8. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 38. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  9. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 54. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  10. Eric L. Boyd (1997). Powers and Pantheons. (TSR, Inc), p. 29. ISBN 0-7869-0657-X.
  11. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 76. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  12. Eric L. Boyd (1997). Powers and Pantheons. (TSR, Inc), p. 37. ISBN 0-7869-0657-X.
  13. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 129. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  14. Eric L. Boyd (1997). Powers and Pantheons. (TSR, Inc), p. 42. ISBN 0-7869-0657-X.
  15. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 149. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  16. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 158. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  17. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 43. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  18. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 47. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  19. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 50. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  20. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 65. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  21. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 68. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  22. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 78. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  23. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 83. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  24. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 54, 72. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  25. Eric L. Boyd (1997). Powers and Pantheons. (TSR, Inc), p. 121. ISBN 0-7869-0657-X.
  26. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 101. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  27. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 118. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  28. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 126. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  29. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 133. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  30. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 163. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  31. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 170, 180. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
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