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Iyachtu Xvim, also known as Godson, was the half-demonic son of Bane and for a time, the lesser deity of fear, hatred, and tyranny. Iyachtu Xvim was consumed in 1372 DR when his father used his body to re-emerge from death, taking Xvim's portfolios as his own.[12]

Those knowledgeable in the ways of the gods have long known that Xvim wished to see his father dead. How ironic for him that he got his wish, only to see Bane replaced by someone even more powerful!
— Elminster, the Sage of Shadowdale[13]

Description[]

Xvim's main avatar was a spindly 12 feet (3.7 meters) tall man with glowing green eyes, scaly black and brown skin, and large claws on his hands. The form had long black hair and many observers found it somewhat similar to a troll.[5] He preferred not to wear clothes.[11][9][14]

Xvim's avatar wielded the Scimitar of Souls, a powerful scimitar that drained the life from its victims.[11]

When appearing in the Realms, Iyachtu Xvim wrapped his scaled shape in illusions that let everyone see him as a middle-aged human male of average height and bright eyes color of emeralds. His hair, skin, and features were dark and attractive, appropriate for the god's vanity.[9] After apotheosis, Xvim was able to shape changeed into the attractive male, instead of wearing illusions.[5]

Manifestations[]

The most common manifestation of the Godson was a large greasy pitch-black cloud with god's green eyes shining through. Each eye was the size of an adult human's head. This manifestation could talk and cast spells at sniveling mortals or shower them with black lightning bolts that singed and burned everything on their way, instead of dealing electricity damage.

Iyachtu Xvim's other manifestation was a 70 feet (21 meters)-long adder as thick as a horse-pulled wagon. Just like other forms, this manifestation had blazing green eyes of the Godson. The giant adder form was not venomous but had a deadly bone tail stinger.[9]

When Xvim communicated with his followers, he sent bats, black dogs, green-eyed black cats, black-and-green moths, flies. He showed favorability through blood hawks and vultures, while sending hematites, black star sapphires, sheens, emeralds, bloodstones, and malachites as an omen.[5]

Personality[]

A stylized symbol of Xvim.

Iyachtu was a vain and evil creature who loved death, destruction, and murder, performing these heinous acts with gleeful joy. He was arrogant, cruel, predatory, and following his imprisonment, he began acting cagier, with more cunning than before. He reveled in mortals' pain, suffering, and groveling for mercy. Xvim's goal was total domination.[5]

Before he claimed Bane's portfolio, Xvim's avatar was very much mortal and could be destroyed, making him ready and eager to retreat before meeting demise.[9]

Powers[]

His savage avatar form had glowing eyes that possessed infravision, allowing Xvim to see 90 feet (27 meters) around him in the darkness.[9] After apotheosis, his sight effectively became true seeing.[5] In that form the Godson could enlarge/reduce his body at will by half. Prior and after apotheosis, he had the power to create darkness with the radius of 15 feet (4.6 meters) at will, and could plane shift between the Material Plane and his native plane of Acheron. Xvim's abilities to move between planes was poor and the tog often missed his exact destination. The plane shift ability was occasionally triggered by the godling's extreme anger. For this reason, Iyachtu disliked planar travel and avoided it when possible. Merely touching silver would cause him horrible pain.[9][11] His vulnerability to silver was gone after he claimed his father godhood, making the avatar invulnerable to any non-enchanted weapons.[5]

Magics such as truename, glyphs, or symbols had no effect on Xvim but immediately attracted the god's attention.[9] Spells like fear and charm were also wasted on the Godson.[5] Any uttering of the his name attracted Xvim's attention as he could hear it across Faerûn. The deity could also hear next nine words that followed Xvim's name. When his name was spoken, the god knew the voice by heart, as well as the distance and direction of the speaker.[9]

After apotheosis, Xvim's arcane powers were not limited by a sphere nor by a school of magic. He preferred using spells that caused long-lasting damage or suffering and magics that twisted mortals' minds into unwilling servitude to the dark god. Reaving blades was the avatar's spell-like ability that Xvim could produce at will with nothing but a thought.[5]

The Godson had the ability to corrupt creatures filled with carnivorous hunger and malice. When Xvim sent a fragment of his will into a regular beast or monster, the creature grew in aggression, power, and was consumed by evil, becoming a Beast of Xvim.[15]

Divine Realm[]

After increasing his divine powers and escaping imprisonment following the Godswar, Xvim established his new realm in Chamada, Gehenna, aptly naming it the Bastion of Hate.[5] Xvim's palace was an imposing basalt fortress that stood amid Chamada's flowing lava rivers, overlooking the fiery lava falls of the Second Mount. The Bastion of Hate was protected from the deadly heat of lava rivers. However, the godling created an opening in one of the palace's walls that led directly into the lava flow's pool. Iyachtu Xvim used the molten rock to inflict endless pain and torture on his prisoners for entertainment and extraction of information.[16]

Relationships[]

Iyachtu did not hold many relationships with other gods, but his relationship with the Legion of the Chimera made him form an affiliation with the church of his father, Bane. At the time, Bane was alive, and Xvim held little divine power.[3] As a deity, Xvim had no allies, especially after his father and superior's death. It was a mystery how Xvim became trapped underneath Zhentil Keep. Even the god himself had no idea. This mystery led him to blame the entirety of Faerûn's pantheon. Every pantheon god was Xvim's enemy, especially Cyric, from whom the Godson stole parts of his portfolio. Some sages and legends claimed that the imprisonment was a deliberate act by Ao.[5] Worshipers of Gargauth targeted Xvim, along with other evil gods, actively seeking to undermine the deities and their churches.[17] When Tiamat was attempting to join the Faerûnian pantheon, she considered the Godson to be her enemy primary enemy as their portfolios of tyranny were too close for comfort.[18] Kossuth considered himself to be allied with Xvim.[19]

Among mortals, Iyachtu Xvim's most hated enemies were Finder Wyvernspur and his friends – the so-called Finder's Band: Joel the Rebel Bard, Jasmine of Westgate, Holly Harrowslough of Lathander, and kender Emilo Haversack from Krynn. The band foiled the Godson's scheme to steal power from goddesses Tymora and Beshaba.[20]

Worshipers[]

The Church[]

Obey or die in pain and utter destruction. Enslave or slay the weak, and be sure that they know their suffering is in Xvim's name and by his will... Slay the priests of other gods whenever you can do so without being identified by others. Capture tyrants and take them to senior clergy members to be delivered unto Xvim. Capture all wizards and bring their magic to the church—or bring them to Xvim's most senior servants so that they can be transformed into creatures who will do service to Xvim as guardians... There is a delight in destruction—feel it, and indulge in it.
— An exert of novice Xvimlar charges[5]
Main article: Church of Iyachtu Xvim

The new god's main power came from the Church of Xvim, or the so-called Church of Darkness, that blossomed in Zhentil Keep, from the dying body of the Church of Bane. The Godson swiftly gained huge numbers of worshipers in the East Faerûn, namely in the nation of Thay. At the height of his power, smaller cults and temples dedicated to Iyachtu Xvim could be found almost everywhere in the Realms. Xvim considered his own rise to power and rebirth of ruined Zhentil Keep to be symbolic and considered the city cosmically linked to his divinity.[5]

The clergy of Xvim included clerics; Authlims – specialty priests; Gauntlets – the recruiters, warriors, and crusaders of the faith; and Orbs – Xvimlar missionaries.[21] The members of the lowest rank in the Church of Xvim were referred to as Vermin, followed by the ranks of Oppressor, Hatemaster, Ruinlord, Tyrannar, and High Tyrannar. The worshipers and members of the church were in awe of the evil god or worshiped out of fear. The church attracted cruel and sadistic people who could be seen casually and aggressively slamming doors, kicking people, throwing rocks into crowds.[5]

Appropriately, Xvim's clerics did not have access to spells and prayers from the healing sphere of divine magic.[22]

Organizations[]

The Legion of the Chimera was an evil sect that believed in equality and justice for half-breeds, the belief that let them to venerate Iyachtu Xvim, the half-breed godling son of Bane. The Legion was led by Isair and Madae and operated out of ruins of the Severed Hand that stood in the shadow of the Spine of the World. The cultists often left offerings at the base of Xvim's statue in the hope that he would honor the Legion with his avatar form. Isair wielded a replica of Iyactu's Scimitar of Souls, honoring the deity. The cult was active from circa 1306 DR to 1312 DR.[3]

Other notable groups that worshiped Xvim included priests of the Cult of the Dragon.[23]

Other Worshipers[]

Among monstrous humanoids, Xvim was worshiped by some hobgoblin tribes of Faerûn[24] and beholders of Underdark, who stayed close to the surface.[25]

Beholderkin, green dragons, blue dragons, fang dragons, brown dragons, hell hounds, cockatrices, pyrolisks, imps, dark nagas, reaves, tso, nyths, and various undead served Iyachtu Xvim after his apotheosis.[5] One such type of undead were the Claws of Xvim. They coulee be found in Xvimlar locations, serving the deity and his powerful priests or wizards.[26]

Dogma[]

The main tenant of Iyachtu Xvim's dogma was to crush, kill, and destroy. All worshipers were to act in the same way as their dark and cruel master. Xvim taught his followers that nothing worthy could be done without death, suffering, destruction, and oppression. He encouraged his devotees to break order and destroy others for personal gain. Xvimlar believed in the song reaching to the top of the social ladder, paying on the weak whose place was groveling and struggling to survive at the very bottom.[5]

Places of Worship[]

The godling showed favoritism for cults, small and underground places of worship, seeing in them potential and growth. Many of his temples were converted from sites of Banelar faith. Despite that, Iyachtu Xvim still had large temples that aimed to awe and intimidate. In the same vein, Xvim's temples were converted into Bane's after the Godson's demise.[5]

  • House of Iyachtu Xvim, a grand temple dedicated to Xvim in Bezantur, the City of a Thousand Temples.[5]
  • House of the Black Lord, a temple of Xvim in Mulmaster that, after Bane's return, was reconsecrated and dedicated to the Godson's father.[27]
  • House Khateera, a private villa of Maryn el Khateera, erected at the pace of destroyed temple of Bane in Calimport. The Villa held a shrine to Xvim.[28]
  • Temple of Iyachtu Xvim of Orlbar that catered to paying Zhentarim caravans.[29]
  • Temple of Iyachtu Xvim of Zhentil Keep was a subterranean place of worship of the Godson.[30]
  • Temple of Dark Eyes, the temple of Xvim erected in Reth, Vilhon Reach in 1372 DR.[31]
  • Vihaddah Semohl, a festhall in Calimport with a shrine to Xvim in its cellars.[32]
  • A Shrine of Xvim could also be found in the city of Esmeltaran in Amn,[33] while more temples to the Godson were taken and converted from the Church of Cyric in the cities of Citadel of the Raven, Yûlash, and Teshwave.[34]

Rituals[]

The tyrantflame and the rise of a Chosen of Xvim.

Followers of Xvim used cruel methods when trying to convert individuals into their faith, torture being a common tool. Fzoul Chembryl used a vat filled with electric eel to dispense blackout levels of pain upon Malik el Sami, a Chosen of Cyric. The options were conversion or prolonged torture.[35]

Each murder committed by a worshiper of Iyachtu Xvim was followed by a prayer, even when in battle. Additional prayers were performed every morning and evening, usually in front of an altar. Other venerations included ritualistic sacrifices of intelligent creatures and savage gladiatorial battles between enraged maddened creatures and captured followers of other gods, performed in a circle of worshipers. The arenas were covered in easily shattered glass items.[5]

Holy Days[]

Xvimites did not have official holidays nor festivals; however, some denominations or cults celebrated the Coming, the day of Godson's apotheosis. The date of Coming was different among different Xvimite groups, yet the Church was attempting to pick a unified date for the festival.[5]

Notable Worshipers[]

Xvim's Chosen[]

History[]

Xvim, being freed from imprisonment by his cult.

Ye can tell much about a parent by looking at the offspring.
— Elminster Aumar[44]


Iyachtu Xvim was said to have been born from the union of Bane and either a greater demon, a fallen paladin or another creature of great evil from the lower planes.[9] In his earlier years, he was known to serve his father only begrudgingly as he traveled Faerûn to spread Bane's influence.[45] At some point, he developed the ability to implant a fragment of his soul into nearly any a creature in order to transform it into a Beast of Xvim.[15]

In the Year of the Toppled Throne, 710 DR, Iyachtu Xvim emerged from a portal above the city of Westgate and backed by a large army of tiefling warriors and demons, seized its throne.[46] Xvim's tyrannical rule was ended in the Year of the Splendid Stag, 734 DR when he was driven out by Farnath Ilistar, the rightful heir to the throne.[47][4]

In the Year of the Griffon, 1312 DR, Iyachtu Xvim was using the Legion of the Chimera and its leaders – Isair and Madae to grow his influence in the Realms. With time, the Godson was planning on taking over the cult's operations in the Severed Hand citadel on the Spine of the World, converting it to worship of his father. When Icewind Dale's heroes arrived at the shrine of Xvim within the fortress, the Godson offered them to become his new allies, replacing Isair and Madae. When denied, the godling appeared as an avatar and unleashed an army of wight lemures, cornugons, and glabrezu. Following a fierce battle, Xvim was defeated and his minions – slain.[3]

At some point in the mid 14th century DR, Iyachtu Xvim's avatar was summoned to Waterdeep, the City of Splendors. A group of hapless adventurers performed a summoning ritual that went awry. Nymara Kitten Scheiron, a beautiful thief, entertainer, and secretly, one of the Masked Lords, crossed blades with the godling's avatar and managed to repel Xvim, securing her city.[48] Defeat at the hands of Nymara was not the only one. At some point before the 14th century, Storm Silverhand dueled Xvim and won, gaining a bitter enemy.[49]

In the Year of the Prince, 1357 DR, Xvim was tasked by his father to punish the Red Wizards of Thay for their failure to show proper deference to Bane.[50] In the Year of the Serpent, 1359 DR, Iyachtu Xvim was summoned to Caer Callidyrr of the Moonshae Isles via sacrifice performed by the Broken Ring cult that worshiped the godling's father. Xvim's mortal avatar faced a group of adventurers but was defeated and forced to flee, giving the Godson a group of bitter rivals to plot revenge against.[51]

In the early days of the calamitous Time of Troubles, the then-demigod's avatar was destroyed. His essence, Xvim's spirit, was mysteriously drawn and imprisoned in an ancient magic circle within the depths of Zhentil Keep. Some sages believed that the deed was done by Ao to prevent the godling from rising to power. Xvim was trapped in the ancient imprisonment circle, stewing in his hate and frustration over not getting a chance to slay Bane with his own claws.[52] During the Godswar, Xvim declared his independence from Bane; however, it was unknown if it happened before or after the father's death. Shortly after his Bane's demise and the end of the Time of Troubles, Iyachtu Xvim was able to make contact with several former Banite priests who had fled underground following the events of the Banedeath of the Year of Maidens, 1361 DR.[5] During his imprisonment, the Godson, was trapped in an incorporeal form in a similar fashion as Xvim's enemy Moander was imprisoned under the town of Yûlash.[52]

In the Year of the Banner, 1368 DR, Iyachtu Xvim's avatar assumed the guise of a deity from KrynnSirrion, the Living Flame, and attempted to trick Lathander into fusing goddesses Beshaba and Tymora back into Lathander's old consort and the mother of the goddess sisters – Tyche. Through a corrupted magical device from Krynn, Iyachtu planned on stealing divine powers from the sisters. The Godson's plans were thwarted by friends and allies of Finder Wyvernspur, Joel, Jasmine, Holly Harrowslough, and Emilo Haversack from the same world of Krynn[20][8]

After a few years of deliberation, many of the Banites decided to recognize Iyachtu Xvim as the rightful heir to the Lord of Darkness. Tapping into their faith, Xvim began working to free himself from his prison.[13] In Ches of the Year of the Gauntlet, 1369 DR, with the aid of his new acolytes, Xvim broke free of his prison beneath the ruins of Zhentil Keep and claimed his father's portfolios of hatred, strife, and tyranny, elevating him to the status of a lesser deity,[53][54] including aspects Xvim stole from a fellow fledgling deity Cyric. The Godson used the Cyrinishad incident to tarnish Cyric's standing in the eyes of his followers, gaining even more divine power through swayed Cyricists.[5]

Bane, emerging from the torn body of Iyachtu Xvim.

In the month of Nightal of 1369 DR, Xvim's Chosen – Fzoul Chembryl, permanently branded Teldorn Darkhope's face with the mark of Xvim, instantly gifting the ruler of Mintar with visions from the Godson. This act converted him to the Xvimist faith. For a time, Fzoul Chembryl was possessed by his deity, leading him to forge a holy artifact of the Church – Scepter of the Tyrant's Eye.[37]

In the Year of the Tankard, 1370 DR, Iyachtu Xvim orchestrated a direct assault on Cyric's faith. The Godson created a putrid gray 'tyrantfog that engulfed the Heartlands, from Starmantle to the Sunrise Mountains, and reaching all the way to Tsurlagol. The second cloud of the tyrantfog materialized in the city of Mintar and slowly enveloped that land all the way to Saradush. The putrid mist affected only Cyricists, causing them to become affected with deadly diseases. Most were consumed in green flames, yet others, who perished from the fog's illnesses rose back as tyrantfog zombies.[15]

On the Midwinter night of the Year of Wild Magic, 1372 DR, the godling was consumed by a blazing green fire, from which emerged Bane, resurrected and restored to his old divine power..[12] Nearly all former clerics of Xvim (who in turn shifted to his allegiance after the death of his father) re-pledged themselves to the Church of Bane.[55]

With their god dead, most worshipers of Xvim returned to worshiping Bane; however, the most devout Xvimites returned to being a cult. The new Cult of Xvim was a clandestine organization that had its agents infiltrate other churches, governments, influential organizations, recently splintered Harpers, and even the Church of Bane himself. The cabal aimed to corrupt good people and organizations, and undermine Bane, eventually putting an end to the deity, returning Xvim to life. Curiously enough, members of this hidden remnant cult were granted supernatural and divine powers. It was unknown if the magic came from Xvim himself, or some other being.[6]

By the 15th century DR, most mortals were convinced Xvim was a dead deity and was completely destroyed. However, the Chosen of Mystra and the most devoted followers of the Godson knew it not to be true. Iyachtu Xvim manifested himself to the Chosen, and the most devote as a ghostly whisper in their dreams and nightmares. Trapped in this incorporeal form, Xvim was craving worship, trying to accumulate followers in desperate anguish and desire to return.[56]

Rumors & Legends[]

  • A theory existed among the sages of the Realms, that claimed that the Year of Bane's Shadow, 267 DR and its name was in reference to Bane fathering Iyachtu Xvim.[57]
  • Some rumors claimed that Xvimist danced and chanted until they entered a state of blood frenzy and attacked slaves and clergy members lower on the totem pole. It was believed that these maddened unarmed battles were done until enough blood was spilled.[5]

Appendix[]

Gallery[]

Appearances[]

Adventures
Halls of the High King
Referenced only
Eye of MyrkulFour from CormyrPool of Radiance: Attack on Myth Drannor
Novels
Finder's BaneTymora's Luck
Referenced only
Crucible: The Trial of Cyric the MadBaldur's Gate II: Shadows of AmnBeyond the High RoadThe SorcererSon of Thunder
Video Games
Icewind Dale II
Referenced only
Neverwinter NightsNeverwinter

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Connections[]


Deities of the Post–Second Sundering Era
Ao the Overgod
Faerûnian Pantheon
Akadi | Amaunator | Asmodeus | Auril | Azuth | Bane | Beshaba | Bhaal | Chauntea | Cyric | Deneir | Eldath | Gond | Grumbar | Gwaeron | Helm | Hoar | Ilmater | Istishia | Jergal | Kelemvor | Kossuth | Lathander | Leira | Lliira | Loviatar | Malar | Mask | Mielikki | Milil | Myrkul | Mystra | Oghma | Red Knight | Savras | Selûne | Shar | Silvanus | Sune | Talona | Talos | Tempus | Torm | Tymora | Tyr | Umberlee | Valkur | Waukeen
The Morndinsamman
Abbathor | Berronar Truesilver | Clangeddin Silverbeard | Deep Duerra | Dugmaren Brightmantle | Dumathoin | Gorm Gulthyn | Haela Brightaxe | Laduguer | Marthammor Duin | Moradin | Sharindlar | Vergadain
The Seldarine
Aerdrie Faenya | Angharradh | Corellon | Deep Sashelas | Erevan | Fenmarel Mestarine | Hanali Celanil | Labelas Enoreth | Rillifane Rallathil | Sehanine Moonbow | Shevarash | Solonor Thelandira
The Dark Seldarine
Eilistraee | Kiaransalee | Lolth | Selvetarm | Vhaeraun
Yondalla's Children
Arvoreen | Brandobaris | Cyrrollalee | Sheela Peryroyl | Urogalan | Yondalla
Lords of the Golden Hills
Baervan Wildwanderer | Baravar Cloakshadow | Callarduran Smoothhands | Flandal Steelskin | Gaerdal Ironhand | Garl Glittergold | Nebelun | Segojan Earthcaller | Urdlen
Orc Pantheon
Bahgtru | Gruumsh | Ilneval | Luthic | Shargaas | Yurtrus
Mulhorandi pantheon
Anhur | Bast | Geb | Hathor | Horus | Isis | Nephthys | Osiris | Re | Sebek | Set | Thoth
Other gods of Faerûn
Bahamut | Enlil | Finder Wyvernspur | Ghaunadaur | Gilgeam | Lurue | Moander | Nobanion | Raven Queen | Tiamat



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