The Kothont (pronounced: /ˈkθɔːntKOTH-awnt[2]) clan was a member of the nobility of Waterdeep, circa the Year of Wild Magic, 1372 DR.[3] They made their fortunes in the fur-trapping trade and the husbandry of various herd beasts.[1][2][3]

Organization[edit | edit source]

From at least the Year of the Prince, 1357 DR,[1] to at least the Year of Wild Magic, 1372 DR, the patriarch of the family was Lord Alaous Kothont also known as "Lord Goldbeard". His consort was Lady Byllia and their eldest son was Dragos.[2][3] As of 1372 DR, there were twenty-seven members of the noble family,[3] although Dalrosz Kothont had been shunned for dabbling in necromancy.[4]

Activities[edit | edit source]

The Kothonts were the first noble family to host the dangerously decadent spectacle known as the Black Bucket Hunt.[5]

Base of Operations[edit | edit source]

The Kothont family compound (labeled N15) circa 1372 DR.

The Kothont family villa was in a walled compound of one- and two-story buildings located on the southwest corner of Delzorin Street and Copper Street in the North Ward of Waterdeep.[6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13] Immediately across Copper Street to the east was the former Maernos family villa that became Holyhands House after the passing of the last member of that noble line.[14][15] On the other side of the alley southwest of the compound was the home and shop of Obelos "The Only" Braeril.[13]

Possessions[edit | edit source]

In addition to their villa in Waterdeep and pastureland for their herds, the Kothonts once had a house in Amphail,[3] but only because Dalrosz Kothont was disowned by the family for practicing necromancy. He moved to Amphail and continued his illicit experiments on corpses and captured brigands until he mysteriously disappeared. The house eventually became Mother Gothal's festhall.[4][16][17]

History[edit | edit source]

The Kothont family were of Illuskan descent and followers of Chauntea. The family was ennobled in the Year of the Cockatrice, 1248 DR. As of 1372 DR, there were twenty-seven living members.[3]

Rumors & Legends[edit | edit source]

When Dalrosz disappeared, various mongrelfolk that were apparently the results of his experiments escaped the house in Amphail. Local legend said that their descendants still roamed the nearby hills and were hazardous to the local fauna and the occasional hapless traveler.[4]

Lord Grimmun Kothont disappeared (wearing a ring of invisibility) sometime in the 15th century DR for at least three years and was generally believed to have fallen into insanity. The family believed he still ate food from the pantry, wore clothes from his closets, bathed in the heated pools of water in the cellars intended for horticulture, and watched over his daughters when they had visitors or went visiting around the city.[18] Lord Grimmun was also one of the speculated voices of a locally famous talking painting that belonged to the Eagleshield family.[19]

Members[edit | edit source]

Appendix[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Ed Greenwood (1987). Waterdeep and the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 47. ISBN 0-88038-490-5.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). “Who's Who in Waterdeep”. City of Splendors (TSR, Inc), p. 18. ISBN 0-5607-6868-1.
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 Eric L. Boyd (2005-09-28). Noble Houses of Waterdeep (Zipped PDF). Wizards of the Coast. p. 5. Archived from the original on 2016-11-01. Retrieved on 2009-10-07.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Eric L. Boyd (2006-05-03). Environs of Waterdeep (Zipped PDF). Wizards of the Coast. p. 8. Archived from the original on 2016-08-16. Retrieved on 2009-10-07.
  5. Ed Greenwood (April 2001). “The New Adventures of Volo: The Urge to Hunt”. In Dave Gross ed. Dragon #282 (Wizards of the Coast), p. 73.
  6. Ed Greenwood and Jeff Grubb (September 1988). City System. Edited by Karen Boomgarden. (TSR, Inc.), p. 12. ISBN 0-8803-8600-2.
  7. Map 9/10 included in Ed Greenwood and Jeff Grubb, cartographers Dennis Kauth and Frey Graphics (September 1988). City System. Edited by Karen Boomgarden. (TSR, Inc.). ISBN 0-8803-8600-2.
  8. Ed Greenwood (1987). Waterdeep and the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 24. ISBN 0-88038-490-5.
  9. Ed Greenwood (January 1993). Volo's Guide to Waterdeep. (TSR, Inc.), p. 239. ISBN 1-56076-335-3.
  10. Map included in Ed Greenwood (January 1993). Volo's Guide to Waterdeep. (TSR, Inc.). ISBN 1-56076-335-3.
  11. Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). “Campaign Guide”. City of Splendors (TSR, Inc), p. 44. ISBN 0-5607-6868-1.
  12. Map included in Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). City of Splendors. (TSR, Inc). ISBN 978-1560768685.
  13. 13.0 13.1 Eric L. Boyd (June 2005). City of Splendors: Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 94, 97. ISBN 0-7869-3693-2.
  14. Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). “Who's Who in Waterdeep”. City of Splendors (TSR, Inc), pp. 18–19. ISBN 0-5607-6868-1.
  15. Eric L. Boyd (June 2005). City of Splendors: Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 73. ISBN 0-7869-3693-2.
  16. 16.0 16.1 slade, et al. (April 1996). “Cities & Civilization”. In James Butler ed. The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (TSR, Inc.), p. 5. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  17. 17.0 17.1 Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 24. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  18. 18.0 18.1 Ed Greenwood (August 2012). “Eye on the Realms: The Lost Dragon of Waterdeep”. In Steve Winter ed. Dragon #414 (Wizards of the Coast), p. 4.
  19. 19.0 19.1 Ed Greenwood (August 2012). “Eye on the Realms: The Lost Dragon of Waterdeep”. In Steve Winter ed. Dragon #414 (Wizards of the Coast), p. 3.

Connections[edit | edit source]

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