The Lurkwood, also known as Vurykvudd to the dwarves,[1] was a great, temperate hardwood[2] forest located south of the Spine of the World.[3] It was one of the woodlands that were collectively called the Moonwoods by some in the North.[4]

Geography[edit | edit source]

The forest was located north of Grunwald[5], where the Thunderbeast tribe dwelled within the wood.[6] To the east of the wood lay the Frost Hills and Mithral Hall; the mining community of Mirabar was west, and the town of Nesmé was to the south-east.[7] The edges of Lurkwood were logged by humans, but its shadowy depths were largely mysterious; plagued with legends of bottomless bogs and deadly quicksand.[8] Beneath the Lurkwood, in the upper Underdark, lay the region called The Wormwrithings[9] and many tunnels connecting to the Underdark could be found within the forest.[10]

Trade[edit | edit source]

A sleeping salve, known as haedrar was made by the Thunderbeast tribe from herbs and roots found within the forest. Though the tribe did not sell haedrar, theft of the salve proved profitable.[11]

History[edit | edit source]

In ancient times, the Lurkwood was part of the High Forest, but it and many other woodlands, were split off by the conflicts of the Crown Wars.[12]

In Eleint of 1366 DR, the gnoll tribe that called themselves the Hoar Fang were destroying large parts of the Lurkwood.[13] The recently empowered Chosen of Mielikki, Jeryth Phaulkon; prominent Harper Bran Skorlsun; a pair of mercenaries; and a force of woodland animals, killed all but the tribe's leader and one lieutenant.[13]

Also in the mid-to-late 1360s, the numerous Urlbluk tribe of kobolds attempted to migrate from the Fell Pass to tunnels beneath the Lurkwood, though at last report, the kobolds had run into violence in the attempt.[14]

Notable Locations[edit | edit source]

  • Chill Tower, headquarters of The Chill, a nonhuman mercenary company.[15]
  • The Dungeon of Death, located just within the southern border of the forest, beneath a grassy hill.[16]

Inhabitants[edit | edit source]

A bad reputation fell over the forest due to its inhabitants. The southern area of Lurkwood was safe and attracted loggers, hunters, woodsmen from the neighboring communities of Mirabar, Nesmé, and Longsaddle.[17] The rest of the wood was overrun with evil creatures, such as orcs.[18] Other monsters preyed on those who entered the forest, like ettins and giants. Several Uthgardt barbarian tribes lived within the forest as well, such as the Elk, Griffon and Sky Ponies. In the eastern parts of Lurkwood toward Fell Pass, the Gray Wolf tribe lived and hunted, numbering more than fifty lycanthropes.[3] Worshipers of Vhaeraun were also known to conduct holy rites in the forest on the night of the new moon.[19]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Ed Greenwood (October 1990). Dwarves Deep. (TSR, Inc.), p. 57. ISBN 0-88038-880-3.
  2. Dale Henson (as slade), Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Steven E. Schend, Jennell Jaquays (as Paul Jaquays), Steve Perrin (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (The Wilderness). (TSR, Inc), p. 4. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Ed Greenwood and Jason Carl (July 2002). Silver Marches. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 32. ISBN 0-7869-2835-2.
  4. Dale Henson (as slade), Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Steven E. Schend, Jennell Jaquays (as Paul Jaquays), Steve Perrin (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (The Wilderness). (TSR, Inc), p. 60. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  5. Warning: edition not specified for Sojourn
  6. Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 46. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  7. Map included in Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  8. Dale Henson (as slade), Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Steven E. Schend, Jennell Jaquays (as Paul Jaquays), Steve Perrin (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (The Wilderness). (TSR, Inc), p. 45. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  9. Christopher Perkins, Adam Lee, Richard Whitters (September 1, 2015). Out of the Abyss. Edited by Jeremy Crawford. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 19. ISBN 978-0-7869-6581-6.
  10. Christopher Perkins, Adam Lee, Richard Whitters (September 1, 2015). Out of the Abyss. Edited by Jeremy Crawford. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 119. ISBN 978-0-7869-6581-6.
  11. Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 46. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  12. Steven E. Schend (March 1998). Hellgate Keep. (TSR, Inc), p. 4. ISBN 978-0786907861.
  13. 13.0 13.1 Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). “Secrets of the City”. City of Splendors (TSR, Inc), p. 10. ISBN 0-5607-6868-1.
  14. Ed Greenwood (April 1995). “Elminster's Notebook: Kobold commotions”. In Kim Mohan ed. Dragon #216 (TSR, Inc.), p. 100.
  15. Tim Beach (1992). Gold & Glory. (TSR, Inc), p. 19. ISBN 1-56076-334-5.
  16. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 294. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  17. Ed Greenwood and Jason Carl (July 2002). Silver Marches. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 32. ISBN 0-7869-2835-2.
  18. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 297. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  19. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 38. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
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