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Meiritin was a short-lived hin province in the Ralamnish Ridings[4] of West Faerûn[1] and a member state of the Calishar Emirates.[4] The reason that Amn had such a high population of halflings was a result of Meiritin's brief existence.[5]

GeographyEdit

Meiritin was located in an area that later became eastern Amn,[5][6] among the northern Tejarn Hills east of Lake Esmel.[1][7] Meiritin's eastern border was the kingdom of Valashar.[8]

GovernmentEdit

Meiritin was a autonomous province in the Calishar Emirates led by a margrave.[2]

HistoryEdit

The margravate was founded in the Year of the Raised Banner, 227 DR[1][7][9] by hin emigrants from the Purple Hills region of Tethyr who had been forcibly expelled.[1] The group was composed of three clans led by Rildoar Amethystall.[10]

This occurred during the reign of Emperor Shoon IV, who encouraged the formation of the Calishar Emirates, which included Meiritin, because he foresaw that he would be able to exploit such small realms with little effort.[4]

Only four years after its founding, the largest settlement of Meiritin was conquered by the Mad Mage Ihundyl, who then declared himself the ruler of the whole Emirates. Because of other unrest further south, the Shoon Empire was unable to immediately respond.[7] Seven years later, in the summer of 238 DR, Elminster Aumar and Myrjala slew Ihundyl, ending his reign.[7][11]

In 284 DR, a population of halflings numbering in the thousands migrated from Meiritin and Tethyr to Myth Drannor.[12]

For much of Meiritin's existence, it was threatened by beholders. A famous magical sword known as the Eyestalker was crafted for one of Meiritin's lords, and for centuries, a succession of champions of Arvoreen wielded it against the powerful foes before the weapon was eventually lost. It became a part of the collection of the sapphire dragon Bleucorundum[13]

In 491 DR, a powerful Calishite nobleman, Kadar el Aktorral,[2] founded the kingdom of Cortryn, gathering Tethyrian and Calishite immigrants and absorbing most of Meiritin, along with its neighbor Valashar.[3] The margrave at this time, Halikam Amethystall, sent a letter to the halflings of Tethyr and King Strohm I for aid, but it is not known if he received a response.[2] In any case, the Duke of Cortryn began oppressing and even enslaving the halfling residents, leading them to abandon Meiritin for good.[3] Many of these fleeing halflings were led by Bellabar Huntinghorn and settled near Secomber on the Delimbiyr.[14] By 523 DR, Meiritin effectively ceased to exist.[3]

At this time, some of the refugees from Meiritin joined with dwarves from Dardath, gnomes from Dolblunde, and elves from Ardeep Forest to form the Realm of the Three Crowns against the threat of orc hordes in the North.[14]

In the late 14th century DR, halfling lorefinders often traveled to the ruins of Meiritin to explore their historic home.[15]

Around the same time period, taking advantage of the turmoil caused by the defection of Riatavin and Trailstone and the rise of the Sythillisian Empire, the Knights of the Shield were secretly involved in an attempt to reestablish Meiritin as a puppet margravate under the control of the Knights.[16]

Notable LocationsEdit

Hyrzashyr 
This river received its name during the time of this kingdom.[17]
Shimmalshyr 
This was another halfling-named river flowing through Meiritin.[5]

AppendixEdit

See AlsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Steven E. Schend (1997). Lands of Intrigue: Book Two: Amn. (TSR, Inc), p. 17. ISBN 0-7869-0697-9.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 89. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Steven E. Schend (1997). Lands of Intrigue: Book Two: Amn. (TSR, Inc), p. 20. ISBN 0-7869-0697-9.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Steven E. Schend and Dale Donovan (September 1998). Empires of the Shining Sea. (TSR, Inc), p. 26. ISBN 978-0786912377.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Steven E. Schend (1997). Lands of Intrigue: Book Two: Amn. (TSR, Inc), p. 3. ISBN 0-7869-0697-9.
  6. Roger E. Moore (January 1999). Demihumans of the Realms. (TSR, Inc.), p. 8. ISBN 0-7869-1316-9.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 Steven E. Schend (1997). Lands of Intrigue: Book Two: Amn. (TSR, Inc), p. 19. ISBN 0-7869-0697-9.
  8. Steven E. Schend (1997). Lands of Intrigue: Book One: Tethyr. (TSR, Inc.), p. 30. ISBN 0-7869-0697-9.
  9. Ed Greenwood (April 1996). “The Athalantan Campaign”. In Pierce Watters ed. Dragon #228 (TSR, Inc.), p. 33.
  10. Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 67. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  11. Ed Greenwood (April 1996). “The Athalantan Campaign”. In Pierce Watters ed. Dragon #228 (TSR, Inc.), p. 34.
  12. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 127. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  13. Eric L. Boyd (July/August 1998). “Sleep of Ages”. In Christopher Perkins ed. Dungeon #69 (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 66–67.
  14. 14.0 14.1 Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 90. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  15. Roger E. Moore (January 1999). Demihumans of the Realms. (TSR, Inc.), p. 52. ISBN 0-7869-1316-9.
  16. Steven E. Schend, Sean K. Reynolds and Eric L. Boyd (June 2000). Cloak & Dagger. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 19. ISBN 0-7869-1627-3.
  17. Steven E. Schend (1997). Lands of Intrigue: Book Two: Amn. (TSR, Inc), p. 45. ISBN 0-7869-0697-9.
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