A list of words and phrases in Midani, the primary language spoken in Zakhara.

A[edit | edit source]

aba 
a loose robe[1]
afwan 
(AHF-wahn) you're welcome[2]
ajami 
(ah-ja-me) non-native inhabitant of Zakhara[3]
akh 
a brother[1]
akeud 
a blood oath[1]
akuua 
a promise[1]
al 
definite article: the, of the; the house of, the tribe of[4]
Al-Badia 
(al-bah-dee-ah) desert nomdads[3]
Al-Hadhar 
(al-had-har) urban inhabitants[3]
'ali 
high[1]
alim 
(ah-leem) an educated person[3]
amarat 
a curved horn[1]
'amiq 
deep[1]
amir 
(variant, emir) a ruler[5]
anf 
nose[6]
anjar 
grapple-like anchor[5]
ard 
land, territory[1]
'arif 
to know[1]
assad 
(Uloushinn dialect, asad) a lion[7][1]
asan 
a (temporary) shelter[1]
'atshan 
thirsty[1]
'ayn 
a spring of water[1]
aywa 
(EYE-wah) yes[8]
aziir 
a scimitar[1]
aziirla 
a killing, a murder[1]
'azim 
great, powerful[1]

B[edit | edit source]

ba'id 
far away[1]
bahriyin 
seamen[5]
baksheesh 
(bak-sheesh) a tip or bribe[3]
baladi 
(bah-lah-DEE)large[9]
balanj 
cabin in a ship[5]
bananiyah 
sailors[5]
bandar 
a port[5]
barchan 
a sand dune shaped like a crescent[5]
bardan 
cold[10]
bawara 
heavy ship anchor[5]
bazan 
(ba-zahn) fire or flames[3]
berrani 
a stranger[1]
burj 
(burge) a tower[3]
buzuq 
(buh-ZOOQ) an instrument similar to a lute[9]

C[edit | edit source]

casbah 
a stronghold or castle[5]

D[edit | edit source]

daff 
(DAHF)a small tambourine[9]
daftar 
sailing instructions, used in place of a chart[5]
da'i 
(die) a missionary or minister, also used as a term for an assassin officer[3]
dalil 
a guide[11]
daqal 
a ship's mast[5]
daraq 
a small shield[4]
darbukkah 
(dar-BOOK-kah)a vase-shaped drum[9]
daroga 
a police magistrate[11]
dhabb 
a large desert lizard[5]
dhow 
a ship of Zakharan origin[5]
didban 
the lookout on a ship[5]
dinar 
(dinar) coin equal to 1 gold piece[3]
dirah 
territory of a desert tribe[5]
dirham 
coin equal to 1 silver piece[4]
diwan 
(di-wahn) the court of a ruler or council, a place of audience[3]
diyya 
compensation paid to a family when one of their members are wrongfully slain[4][12]
dusur 
caulking for a ship's hull

E[edit | edit source]

effendi 
a master[11]
Es salam alekum. 
(ess sah-LAMB ah-LEH-koom) Peace be upon you. (a general greeting)[8]

F[edit | edit source]

faddi 
silver[13]
fidai 
(pl, fedayeen) one who sacrificed him- or herself for a cause, a brave warrior[3]

G[edit | edit source]

gared-guur 
Uloushinn dialect: "slayer from the skies"; manticore[citation needed]
gassi 
rocky path between two sand dunes[5]
gizam 
Uloushinn dialect: boots[14]

H[edit | edit source]

hababa 
a hammock made from the skin of a sheep. The skin was stretched over four poles of wood and was meant for children[15]
habl 
rope,[1][16] tether[1]
hagar motab 
Uloushinn dialect: "bringer of stone-death"; a basilisk[17]
hama 
spirit[3][18]
hammam 
public bath[3]
harab 
wild wastes[19]
haram 
a holy site[5]
harim 
female quarters[5]
harrat 
field of volcanic debris[5]
hatar 
(hah-TAR) danger[2]
hazneh 
treasury[11]
huriye 
a young man or woman of voluptuous beauty[3]

I[edit | edit source]

imam 
a leader of a church, or holy man[3]
ins 
one of the Enlightened races, a non-genie[3][11]
ishtiyam 
the navigator of a ship[5]

J[edit | edit source]

jabal 
a mountain or peak[3]
jahlah 
(jah-LAH) a small clay pot filled with stones used as a rattle[9]
jalla 
camel dung[5]
jama 
pulley block[5]
jambiya 
curved double-edged dagger[4]
jari 
courageous[3]
jawzah 
(jauh-ZAH) a spiked fiddle[9]
jazirat 
island[5]
jellaba 
heavy winter robe[5] or night cloak[1]
jinn 
a term for any type of genie[11]
jummah 
hold of a ship[5]

K[edit | edit source]

kalb 
dog[20]
kalian 
a smoking pipe[11]
kamal 
simple tool for navigation[5]
kashabat 
watch tower made from simple scaffolding[5]
katar 
short punch dagger[5]
kavir 
salt or mud flat[5]
keffiyeh 
headcloth[5]
khabb 
a gale or typhoon[5]
khamsin 
destructive wind storm made of hot air[3]
khann 
a compass point[5]
khayt 
stitch in the hull of a ship[5]
khon khors 
a dao title for blood-drinkers[11]
khreima 
a tent[21]
kizzil bash 
someone with red hair[11]
koumiss 
fermented mare's milk[5]
kwayis 
(KWAY-iss) good[2]

L[edit | edit source]

la 
(LAH) no[8]
lasiq 
beginner, one lacking experience (Assassins used this term for their lowest ranking members.)[3]

M[edit | edit source]

ma 
(MAH) water[2]
Maas salama. 
(mahs sah-LAMB-ah) Go with peace.[8]
madina 
the market or center of a town[3]
madra 
a school[22]
manjus 
a scoundrel or swindler[3]
maristan 
a hospital[22]
mat 
to die[1]
mehari 
a racing camel[3]
mihrab 
a prayer niche within a mosque[11]
mijayrah 
(mih-JAY-rah) a recorder[9]
minbar 
a pulpit[11]
min fadlak 
(min FAHD-lahk) please[8]
mirwas 
(MEER-waz)a small double-sided drum used by the pearl fishermen of the Pearl Cities[9]
mish 
(mish) not (Mish negates whatever adjective it precedes.)[2]
mish kwayis 
(mish KWAY iss) bad[2]
mizwid
food pouch; also name of the Zakharan bagpipes[9]
mitbiq 
(miht-BEEQ)a double clarinet[9]
mizwid 
(mihz-WEED))a Zakharan bagpipe[9]
mot 
death[1]
mulahid 
agnostic or blasphemous, non-enlightened[3]

N[edit | edit source]

na'al 
a horseshoe[23]
nabat 
a plant[1][16]
nabidh 
an intoxicating drink made from fermented dates[3]
nafir 
(nah-FEER) a long trumpet[9]
nargil 
a coconut[24]
naqqarah 
(nah-KAR-rah)a side drum[9]
nay 
(NAY)a flute[9]
nidir 
a vow[3]
nisr 
an eagle[3]

O[edit | edit source]

oyun 
eye[6]

P[edit | edit source]

purdah 
(Uloushinn dialect) a "honeymoon", a period of time following a Bedine wedding during which a bride was forbidden to leave her husband's tent[21]

Q[edit | edit source]

qadi 
a judge[3]
qahwa 
(Uloushinn dialect, qaw) coffee[25]
qal'at 
fortress; a fortified keep, manor, or palace.[24]
qanun 
(qah-NOON) an instrument similar to a zither[9]
qaraqib 
(kah-rah-KEEB)small metal clackers[9]
qas'ah 
(KAH-sah)kettle drums[9]
qatil 
(pl, quttal) an assassin[3]
Qaynat 
the harim of the fourth Grand Caliph[9]
qinbar 
coir, coconut fiber. Cordage for making ropes.[24]

R[edit | edit source]

rababah 
(rah-BAH-bah) a popular stringed instrument[9]
rakiq 
a beverage made from sheep's milk and garlic known for its tang[26]
reikh'irud 
Uloushinn dialect: tarantula[27]
rafiq 
any form of comrade[3]
rih 
wind[1]
rihba'id 
tent fly (literally, "wind-away")[16]
riqq 
(REEK)a tambourine[9]
ruqad 
sleep[10]

S[edit | edit source]

saheeda 
(sah-EE-da) greetings, hello, goodbye[8]
sajat 
(sah-JAHT)finger tambourines[9]
saji 
to be brave[3]
saka 
water-bearer[28]
samm 
(SAHM) poison[2]
santur 
(SAHN-toor)) a hammer dulcimer[9]
sarahin 
a den of wolves[3]
selama 
a harem of attractive men[29]
shef 
a sword (other than a scimitar)[1][16]
shukran 
(SHOOK-rahn) thank you[2]
shurr 
loose sand[1]
sufinah 
ship[24]
sukhteh 
burnt[11]
suq 
marketplace[3]

T[edit | edit source]

tabaddur 
foresight[30]
tabl 
(TAB-leh)a small double-sided drum[9]
tahrik min qad 
(tah-REEK min kahd) Zakharan legend telling of a holy warrior's redemption after their downfall[4]
takht 
platform or group of rawunin[19]
taqiyya 
a doctrine of caution, used by believers to justify concealment of their beliefs that other object to[3]
tarab 
enchantment[19]
tarkib al-azam 
skeleton[31]
tatalla 
eye[32]
tawa'if 
a guild for musicians[9]
thurgur 
military zone of the efreet[11]

U[edit | edit source]

'Ud 
(OOD) an instrument similar to a lute[9]
ulugarr 
Uloushinn dialect: outlander[33]

W[edit | edit source]

Wa alekum es salam 
(wah ah-LEH-koom ess sah-LAMB) Peace be upon you also. (response to the greeting Es salam alekum.)[8]
wadi 
seasonal or dry riverbed[3]

Y[edit | edit source]

yadd 
hand[34]
ybbah! 
Oh, papa! (an expression of surprise)[2]
ymmah! 
Oh, mama! (an expression of surprise)[2]

Z[edit | edit source]

zardkhanah 
an arsenal or storage of weapons[3]

Appendix[edit | edit source]

Background[edit | edit source]

Midani words and expressions were mostly derived from a simplified transliteration of Arabic.[35]

See Also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 1.18 1.19 1.20 1.21 1.22 1.23 1.24 1.25 1.26 Inside cover included in Ed Greenwood (November 1991). Anauroch. Edited by Karen S. Boomgarden. (TSR, Inc.). ISBN 1-56076-126-1.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), p. 125. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 3.15 3.16 3.17 3.18 3.19 3.20 3.21 3.22 3.23 3.24 3.25 3.26 3.27 3.28 3.29 3.30 3.31 3.32 3.33 3.34 3.35 Wolfgang Baur (1993). Al-Qadim: Assassin Mountain: Holy Slayer Sourcebook. (TSR, Inc), p. 32. ISBN 1-56076-764-X.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 Jeff Grubb and Andria Hayday (April 1992). Arabian Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 156. ISBN 978-1560763581.
  5. 5.00 5.01 5.02 5.03 5.04 5.05 5.06 5.07 5.08 5.09 5.10 5.11 5.12 5.13 5.14 5.15 5.16 5.17 5.18 5.19 5.20 5.21 5.22 5.23 5.24 5.25 5.26 5.27 5.28 5.29 5.30 5.31 5.32 5.33 David Cook (October 1992). “Home Port: Wherein the Tale Begins”. In Bill Slavicsek ed. Golden Voyages (TSR, Inc.), p. 30. ISBN 978-1560763314.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Nicky Rea (1994). Corsairs of the Great Sea (Campaign Guide). (TSR, Inc), p. 5. ISBN 978-1560768678.
  7. Tim Beach, Tom Prusa and Steve Kurtz (1993). City of Delights (Gem of Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), p. 77. ISBN 1-56076-589-5.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), p. 124. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  9. 9.00 9.01 9.02 9.03 9.04 9.05 9.06 9.07 9.08 9.09 9.10 9.11 9.12 9.13 9.14 9.15 9.16 9.17 9.18 9.19 9.20 9.21 9.22 9.23 9.24 Jeff Grubb (February 1993). “Sounds of Wonder & Delight”. In Roger E. Moore ed. Dragon #190 (TSR, Inc.), pp. 84–88.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Wolfgang Baur (1993). Secrets of the Lamp (Monstrous Compendium Pages). (TSR, Inc.). ISBN 1-56076-647-6.
  11. 11.00 11.01 11.02 11.03 11.04 11.05 11.06 11.07 11.08 11.09 11.10 11.11 11.12 Wolfgang Baur (November 1993). Secrets of the Lamp. Genie Lore. (TSR, Inc.), p. 64. ISBN 978-1560766476.
  12. Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Fortunes and Fates). (TSR, Inc), p. 19r. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  13. Nicky Rea (1994). Corsairs of the Great Sea (Campaign Guide). (TSR, Inc), p. 25. ISBN 978-1560768678.
  14. James Butler, Elizabeth T. Danforth, Jean Rabe (September 1994). “Anauroch”. In Karen S. Boomgarden ed. Elminster's Ecologies (TSR, Inc), p. 6. ISBN 1-5607-6917-3.
  15. Rick Swan (1994). Al-Qadim: Caravans: Adventure Book. (TSR, Inc), p. 9. ISBN 1-56076-903-3.
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 16.3 Ed Greenwood (November 1991). Anauroch. Edited by Karen S. Boomgarden. (TSR, Inc.), p. 14. ISBN 1-56076-126-1.
  17. James Butler, Elizabeth T. Danforth, Jean Rabe (September 1994). “Anauroch”. In Karen S. Boomgarden ed. Elminster's Ecologies (TSR, Inc), p. 7. ISBN 1-5607-6917-3.
  18. Wolfgang Baur (November 1993). Secrets of the Lamp. Genie Lore. (TSR, Inc.), p. 43. ISBN 978-1560766476.
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 Jeff Grubb (February 1993). “Sounds of Wonder & Delight”. In Roger E. Moore ed. Dragon #190 (TSR, Inc.), pp. 84–88.
  20. Wolfgang Baur (1993). Al-Qadim: Assassin Mountain: Holy Slayer Sourcebook. (TSR, Inc), p. 30. ISBN 1-56076-764-X.
  21. 21.0 21.1 Ed Greenwood (November 1991). Anauroch. Edited by Karen S. Boomgarden. (TSR, Inc.), p. 16. ISBN 1-56076-126-1.
  22. 22.0 22.1 Tim Beach, Tom Prusa and Steve Kurtz (1993). City of Delights (Gem of Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), p. 63. ISBN 1-56076-589-5.
  23. Rick Swan (1994). Al-Qadim: Caravans: Adventure Book. (TSR, Inc), p. 12. ISBN 1-56076-903-3.
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 24.3 David Cook (October 1992). “Home Port: Wherein the Tale Begins”. In Bill Slavicsek ed. Golden Voyages (TSR, Inc.), p. 31. ISBN 978-1560763314.
  25. Ed Greenwood (October 2012). Ed Greenwood Presents Elminster's Forgotten Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 93. ISBN 0786960345.
  26. Rick Swan (1994). Al-Qadim: Caravans: Campaign Guide. (TSR, Inc), p. 13. ISBN 1-56076-903-3.
  27. James Butler, Elizabeth T. Danforth, Jean Rabe (September 1994). “Anauroch”. In Karen S. Boomgarden ed. Elminster's Ecologies (TSR, Inc), p. 5. ISBN 1-5607-6917-3.
  28. Tim Beach, Tom Prusa and Steve Kurtz (1993). Al-Qadim: City of Delights (Golden Huzuz). (TSR, Inc), p. 63. ISBN 1-56076-589-5.
  29. Jackie Cassada, Nicky Rea (1998). Reunion. (TSR, Inc.), p. 9. ISBN 0-7869-1196-4.
  30. Steve Kurtz (1994). Al-Qadim: Ruined Kingdoms: Campaign Guide. (TSR, Inc), p. 8. ISBN 1-56076-815-0.
  31. Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Adventurer's Guide to Zakhara). (TSR, Inc), p. 37. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  32. David C. Sutherland III and Cynthia K. Felegy (1993). “City of Delights (Monstrous Compendium)”. In Tim Beach, Tom Prusa and Steve Kurtz eds. City of Delights (TSR, Inc). ISBN 1-56076-589-5.
  33. James Butler, Elizabeth T. Danforth, Jean Rabe (September 1994). “Anauroch”. In Karen S. Boomgarden ed. Elminster's Ecologies (TSR, Inc), p. 4. ISBN 1-5607-6917-3.
  34. David Cook (October 1992). “The Djinni's Claws”. In Bill Slavicsek ed. Golden Voyages (TSR, Inc.), p. 3. ISBN 978-1560763314.
  35. Jeff Grubb and Andria Hayday (April 1992). Arabian Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 156. ISBN 978-1560763581.
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