The Moonsea, also known as the Moonsea Lands,[3] was a region in north Faerûn, dominated by the large sea after which it was named.[1] It was a grim and wild frontier that was home to several city states dominated by evil despots, with no central capital to maintain order. While it was not necessarily a safe place to live, its settlers were driven, independent, and strong-willed people.[10][11] Its central location between the untamed lands to the north, along with the rustic faming communities and powerful trading powers to the south fostered varied and contrasting communities that suffered much conflict and turbulence between their people.[12]

The Moonsea is rich, indeed...but it is a hard place to live—cold, brutal, and dangerous, and it makes the men who live there into something much the same, tempering the soft iron of their spirits into cold sharp steel.

Description[edit | edit source]

A land of hard terrain, severe climate,[3] and tyrannical rulers, the frontier of the Moonsea was a place where only the strongest people survived—and those that did very much prided themselves on that fact. Despite these harsh realities, its wealth of natural resources and the competitive nature of its people made it a land of opportunity to some,[1][14] especially those with the will and severity to thrive.[15]

Ecology[edit | edit source]

The terrain of the Moonsea was a veritable treasure-trove of resources, its southern and western coast lands were rich in raw resources and game,[16] its mountains full of ore and minerals,[17] and seas teemed with fish and crustaceans.[18]

Weather[edit | edit source]

The Moonsea climate could be described as harsh and cold. While not as cold as the Silver Marches to the west, the weather was significantly foul, enough to cause the seas to freeze over during the winter. People of the Moonsea were used to wearing cold-weather and other bulky clothes year-round.[19]

The bitter, eastern shores around Mulmaster and the Earthspur Mountains were particularly harsh, as they were constantly battered by piercing winds and heavy snowfall.[20] To add to the despair that permeated the land, the sky itself was black from pollution, a by-product of the industry of Melvaunt.[21]

The turbulent waters of the actual sea were beset with constant storms.[12] As unpleasant as the skies were over the waters, they were not nearly as foul as the black cloud of smoke that hung over the north shores above Melvaunt.[21]

Geography[edit | edit source]

The Moonsea region comprised the coastal lands around the sea from which it drew its name, and was considered the northernmost of the Eastern Heartlands.[2] It was bordered on the northwest by the appropriately named Border Forest,[22] to the north by the vast steppes of the Ride and the desolate lands of Thar, on the west and southwest by the Dalelands, and along the south by the expansive forest of Cormanthor.[23]

Geographical Features[edit | edit source]

The Dragonspine Mountains in the northwest of the Moonsea,[17] were rugged and bitterly cold, but rich in raw, natural resources, and home to the great River Tesh.[24] To the west were untamed and sparsely inhabited hinterlands,[14] the serene plains of the Grass Sea,[25] and savage wetlands such as the Twilight Marsh.[26] The marshlands were nearly entirely undevelopable; attempts to construct buildings and lay roads outside the major cities were futile,[27] and all that could be found within were scattered ruins and sporadic farms, home to bands of ravaging humanoids and monstrous beasts.[28] The Stojanow river[27][29] and the Quivering Forest seperated the the western and eastern stretches of the Moonsea's north shore, acting as a barrier with Thar to the northeast.[30]

The actual Moonsea was a freshwater lake[31] of clear, turbulent waters that shone a dark purple and were wracked by frequent storms.[12] Its depths were rumored to connect to the Elemental Plane of Water,[17] and even housed an island that only above the surface every few years.[32]

Most of the southern shores of the Moonsea were lands of peace and natural beauty in comparison to the north. While the northern borders of Cormanthor lacked the raw, valuable riches of the Dragonspines, they were plentiful in lumber, which complemented the wealth of fish and sea life within the rivers that fed into the Moonsea itself.[33] The beauteous and bountiful terrain came to and end as they reached the River Lis, east of which were the cold, cruel lands around the Bay of Mulmaster and its namesake city.[20][17] South of these rough lands were the River Dalton,[34] that formed from the fetid swamp known as the Flooded Forest.[17]

Flora & Fauna[edit | edit source]

The Moonsea lake contained an abundance of species of freshwater sea life,[35][18] including giant pike, lamprey and a great number of schools of more common fish. The more dangerous denizens under the waves included aquatic trolls and ogres, known respectively as scrags and merrow,[35] and at least one gargantuan dragon turtle.[18]

Great herds of rothé roamed across the northern stretches of the Moonsea lands.[36]

Government[edit | edit source]

Zhentil Keep? Hillsfar? Who can tell which is the lesser of two evils?
— Common saying in the Moonsea.[33]

The region of the Moonsea had no unified government, but rather several warring city-states that offered their people safety from the dangers beyond their influence, even if they were not protected from those found within.[11] These city-states regularly vied for power against and occasionally made peace with one another for brief periods during their shared history.[37][38] From a geo-political standpoint, the Moonsea was a land of petty despots,[1][3][15][39] xenophobic dictators,[40] and power-hungry tyrants.[41]

Melvaunt was the sole seat of power on the northern shore of the Moonsea, welcoming many of those that were new to the region. Boasting the largest docks in the region, Melvaunt was the considered a bastion of commerce and industry, conducting business across the Moonsea lake with the coastal cities along the western and southern shores.[1][27][42]

Zhentil Keep held the the greatest control in the lands along the western branch, and for a time the entirety of the Moonsea. For centuries it was the seat of power for the far-reaching semi-secret mercantile group known as the Zhentarim,[43] before it was utterly destroyed twice in the decades leading up to the mid–15th century.[28][14] While the Zhent order lived on in the west, their home city remained nothing more than ruins.[44]

Hillsfar was situated in the same area of the Moonsea, in the shadow of the more-influential Zhent power. It was a xenophobic state that pitted non-human races against one another for many years,[33] before becoming a wealthy merchant-state in its own right, eventually dominating trade in the 15th century.[14]

Mulmaster maintained dominance along with eastern stretch of the Moonsea's southern coast, isolated from the other city-states. It was a cesspool of crime, mercantile intrigue and emerged as the center for devoted Bane-worship in the decades after the fall of Zhentil Keep.[45][46]

Society[edit | edit source]

The people of the Moonsea are hard and unforgiving because if they weren't they'd be dead at the hands of monsters, tyrants, or the cruel turns of nature herself.
— Khelben Arunsun.[13]

In the eyes of the Moonsea folk, the world was a cruel place that only allowed those with the strongest will to survive. The ruined settlements that accumulated across the region throughout its history were a testament to the fact that kindness and benevolence were not enough for those that lived in their lands. As a while they distrusted strangers,[1] held tight to private matters, and did not reveal to others anything that could be seen as a weakness.[47]

To the rest of the Realms, the people of the Moonsea were predominantly viewed as surly, resentful people that did not take kindly to outsiders. While it was not believed that all folks from the region were dangerous, or particularly evil, many travelers acted as such while in their lands, just to be on the safe side.[1][47]

Trade[edit | edit source]

For many years throughout the Moonsea's history, the secretive mercantile group known as the Zhentarim became synonymous with power held within. They intertwined their financial interests with those of the region,[48] and strived to dominate trade from the Moonsea to the realms beyond.[49]

Currency[edit | edit source]

The standard currencies used in the cities of the Moonsea were those minted by the southern nations of Cormyr and Sembia, though authokhs and bebolts were accepted as well.[8][9]

Trade Routes[edit | edit source]

Due to the untenable land found across the northern coast of the Moonsea proper, most major trade or travel conducted in that area was done so at sea.[27]

In the western Moonsea, the major trading roads of the Tesh Trail, the Throat, and Bowshaft Way created a triangle of commerce between Zhentil Keep, Voonlar, and Teshwave, the latter of which rested on the Tesh river. The river was a major trade route that facilitated the movement of Moonsea goods to the west,[28] even across the desert of Anauroch to the Sword Coast North, by means of the Black Road.[50]

On the southern coast, the eastern stretch of Bowshaft Way linked Yûlash with the city of Hillsfar.[34][51] Extending south from Hillsfar was the Moonsea Ride, the trade route that linked the Moonsea with the Dalelands to the south and the kingdom of Cormyr beyond.[23]

Defenses[edit | edit source]

Dare—and Beware!
— The battle cry of the Moonsea.[1][13]

Many of of the Moonsea's city-states boasted an army that protected their own interests, though seldom acted in defense of their neighbors—unless there was something to be gained. Most notable among these military forces were the Zhentilar of Zhentil Keep,[52] and the Red Plumes of Hillsfar.[53][54]

Beyond its constantly-warring armies, the Moonsea was fighting forces dedicated to protection of their people, especially the oppression brought forth by Zhentil Keep and the Zhentarim. The Knights of the North were a band of freedom fighters that led raids against the Zhents,[55] and their aerial cavalry squads called the Moonsea skysentinels.[56]

History[edit | edit source]

In the era when the Sea of Dragons was still rife with ogres and giants, its coasts were settled by barbarians from the Ride,[15] that were said to be descended from the Angardt people of ancient Rengarth.[57][58] The realm of Teshar first emerged within the region in the Year of Dashed Dreams, −87 DR. Around 400 years later, the burgeoning civilization was joined by refugees from Netherese survivor-state of Hlondath.[59][60][61]

By the Year of the Dagger, 348 DR, they founded the citadel of Northkeep on an island near the southern shore of the sea,[1][15] as a departure point of sorts for adventures into the lands of the north.[16] The city of Phlan was founded just a mere decade later, though it would face repeated raisings and reconstructions over many centuries.[62] Unfortunately for Teshar, the growing popularity of the Northkeep drew the attention of the Dark Alliance of Thar, which aimed to put an end to their excursions into their lands.[16]

In the Year of the Blue Shield, 400 DR, on a night that came to be known as the First Turnabout, the Dark Alliance assaulted and destroyed Northkeep from black-sailed ships in the Sea of Dragons, as well as mounted upon the backs of black dragons.[1] After the attack, tens of thousands priests, mages and shamans chanted along the coastlines of the sea and sunk the city beneath its waves.[16] The realm of Teshar was no more.[63]

While human-built more cities in the region were repeatedly destroyed by the Alliance, in time human civilization succeeded.[15] Men achieved this feat with no help from the Elven Court who were concerned with defense of their forests from skirmishers and evil raiders.[64]

In the Year of the Laughing Lich, 536 DR, the realm of Hlontar emerged in the western branch of the Moonsea, along the valley formed by the River Tesh. It survived for a few decades before crumbling in on itself.[65]

The southern stretch of the Moonsea saw a large emigration of dwarves from Myth Drannor in the Year of the Angry Caverns, 672 DR. The dwarves made their home in the western tunnels of Sarphil,[66] their realm that had been lost several millennia prior.[67]

In the Year of Despairing Elves, 711 DR, many of the trading settlements nestled along the western Moonsea were devastated by the Army of Darkness, as the Weeping War broke out in Cormanthyr.[68][69]

Thentia came to be founded several hundred years later, in 800 DR, by the actions of a few united families;[70] and Hulburg just over a hundred years later, in 940 DR, as a base for those who fought the giants and evil humanoids of That.[71]

In a rare sign of unity, the combined powers of the Moonsea worked together to rebuild the Citadel of the Raven in the Year of the Crumbling Keep, 1276 DR. Forces from the major city-states and even some of the smaller cities each maintained a contingent of their forces at the citadel, so that it could best serve as a bulwark against the dangerous beast-men of the lands to the north.[72][73]

14th Century[edit | edit source]

...one day, a man with hair of flame shall take up my scepter and smite the lands around the Moonsea.
— Bane to his devoted follower Brest.[74]

Great turmoil arose in the region start of the 14th century when the Moonsea War erupted in the Year of Thunder, 1306 DR. Mulmaster conquered the cities of Hulburg and Sulasspryn, before being defeated itself by the other allied city-states along with the assistance of Sembia.[75][76]

Some decades later in the Year of the Morningstar, 1350 DR, the god Bane attempted to drag Phlan and several other of the region's cities into the "nether regions" in order to increase his own power. The god's plot was foiled by the heroic band known as the Heroes of Phlan.[77]

In the Year of the Harp, 1355 DR,[78] Zhent forces betrayed the allies they forged after Mulmaster's defeat and utilized poison and dark magic to enact a treacherous takeover of the Citadel of the Raven.[79] In short order the Zhentilar army marched against numerous Moonsea cities in an attempted military takeover of the region, but were rebuffed by their former allies, whose forces were bolstered by soldiers from Cormyr and Sembia.[80]

The following year, the lands of the Moonsea along with Cormyr and the Dales were ravaged by the flight of dragons. Both Phlan and Yûlash were destroyed,[77][81][82] and thousands killed during the carnage.[83]

By the Year of Wild Magic, 1372 DR, the Zhents gained control of nearly all the Moonsea region.[22][84] Within a scant couple years, Fzoul Chembryl would declare himself as "Tyrant of the Moonsea".[85]

15th Century[edit | edit source]

During the mid 1480s DR, the returned empire of Netheril embarked on a campaign of conquest against the Moonsea,[3] just as they had with Sembia a few years before.[86] While the Netherese Shadovar managed to destroy Zhentil Keep and the Citadel of the Raven, effectively dismantling the Zhentarim, they could not conquer the entire region. Hillsfar, Melvaunt, and Thentia struck an alliance with the returned city of Myth Drannor, in an act of self-preservation.[14]

Rumors & Legends[edit | edit source]

While Northkeep was the first settlement of the Moonsea in recorded history,[15][1] ancient draconic lore spoke of Ironfang Keep being built approximately 25,000 years before Dale Reckoning.[87]

The lands have been written about in at least one publication, Volo's Guide to the Moonsea, written by the the continent-traversing bard Volothamp Geddarm.[88]

Notable Locations[edit | edit source]

North Coast[edit | edit source]

Melvaunt, the city-state and power that dominated the northern coast.

Settlements

These barren and deadly lands on the Moonsea's north shore were rampant goblinoid hordes, and polluted with the endless clouds of smoke of industry.[21]

  • Melvaunt, located south of desolate Thar,[27] this smoke-filled mercantile metropolis was a political hotbed and well-known hub of slave trade in the region.[42].The lands surrounding the city proper were among the most dangerous in all of Faerûn.[27]
  • Phlan, the small city at the mouth of the Stojanow River,[89] that had been destroyed countless times by war and monsters, only to have been continuously rebuilt.[62]
  • Thentia, a small, militarily weak city that retained fierce independence and strong trade[70] in what was a harsh climate, both geographically, and politically.[21]
  • Turell[90]
Landmarks
Crossing InnGazzeth • Giant's Cairn • Grimshackle JailHulburgKing's Pyre • Lone Tower • Point MonseaSeawave RuinsSorcerer's IsleSulassprynVig's Dock

West Branch[edit | edit source]

Zhentil Keep, the seat of power for the far-reaching Zhentarim

The most populated region of the Moonsea was also most rife with Zhentarim influence and Zhentilar occupation.[91]

Settlements
  • Zhentil Keep, a widely influential city-state that was home to the infamous network of spies and manipulators known as the Zhentarim.[43] Before having been twice destroyed,[14] it was the oldest standing settlement within the region.[92]
  • Hillsfar, the large mercantile city-state that was located on Tailings Bay on the southern coast of the Moonsea. It was a crucial hub of commerce and was home to important merchant-nobles and guild masters.[14][72]
  • Aleston, a small town with a brewery and mill.[93]
  • Citadel of the Raven, the fortress-complex of interconnected towers and underground passageways was once shared by the powers of the Moonsea,[52] before becoming a seat of power and symbol for the Black Network.[94]
  • Elventree, a small Sylvan settlement that was established shortly after the fall of Myth Drannor that was intended as a place where elves could safely meet with their non-elven allies.[95][96]
  • Hillpicket, one of several small farming villages.[97]
  • The Stop, a minor caravan stop situated on the Tradeway.[98]
  • Teshwave, while officially this city was under the jurisdiction of Teshendale, it eventually under sway of Zhent influence.[89]
  • Voonlar, an apparent independent barony that acted as the chief rival to the town of Shadowdale.[89] The city was in fact under Zhentarim control for quite some time.[43]
  • Yûlash, The city-upon-a-plateau was once an important city but fell into decline over the centuries.[43][99][100]
Landmarks
Chamber of Spells Guarded • Elua's Lighthouse • The Maiden's Loss • Scarp • Seat of Bane • Shrine to TempusTinfellow ValleyWaydownWizard's labyrinth

South Coast[edit | edit source]

Mulmaster, the City of Danger on the southern coast

The desolate lands on the southeastern shores of the Moonsea were secluded away from the rest.[20][17]

  • Mulmaster, a crime-ravaged metropolis on the southern shore was seen as a distinctly evil place.[45] After decades of influence from the Zhentarim,[89] it had by the 15th century become the home for worship for the god Bane.[46]
Landmarks
Dalton's lighthouseDrowned TowerHarr's HoldLis RuinsPoint IronThe Retreat

Inhabitants[edit | edit source]

The Moonsea region was a particularly dangerous one. Considering the sea itself was once referred to as the Sea of Dragons, the remnants of dragon lairs littering the wilderness, a byproduct of the land being their former mating grounds, came as little surprise.[11] Bronze dragons made their lairs near the eastern shores of the sea,[104] while green dragons were still active along the northern coast near Thar.[27] Even some fang dragons were known to dwell within the Moonsea's forests.[105]

In fact the lands of the Moonsea bordering Thar featured other strange beasts and monstrous humanoids, including hordes of ogres,[27] orogs, both mountain orcs and gray orcs,[106][107] and goblins. [21] Many humanoids living in the Moonsea outside if its cities included dangerous bands of pirates, raiders and bandits.[11]

Appendix[edit | edit source]

Appearances[edit | edit source]

Novels
The Heroes of Phlan trilogy (Pool of Radiance, Pools of Darkness, Pool of Twilight)

Gallery[edit | edit source]

Further reading[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 159. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood (1990). Forgotten Realms Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 71. ISBN 0-8803-8828-5.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Edited by Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 85. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  4. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 23. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  5. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 13. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  6. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 143. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  7. Richard Baker (1993). The Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), pp. 13–14. ISBN 978-1560766674.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Ed Greenwood, Eric L. Boyd (March 2006). Power of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 78. ISBN 0-7869-3910-9.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Ed Greenwood (October 2012). Ed Greenwood Presents Elminster's Forgotten Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 118–119. ISBN 0786960345.
  10. Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 19. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Darrin Drader, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 6. ISBN 0-7869-3915-X.
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 John Terra (January 1995). “Reference Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 2. ISBN 978-0786900923.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Darrin Drader, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 4. ISBN 0-7869-3915-X.
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.5 14.6 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Edited by Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 150. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 15.4 15.5 Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 63. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 16.3 John Terra (January 1995). “Reference Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 3. ISBN 978-0786900923.
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 17.3 17.4 17.5 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 159. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 John Terra (January 1995). “Reference Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 63. ISBN 978-0786900923.
  19. Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Darrin Drader, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 5. ISBN 0-7869-3915-X.
  20. 20.0 20.1 20.2 Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Darrin Drader, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 88. ISBN 0-7869-3915-X.
  21. 21.0 21.1 21.2 21.3 21.4 John Terra (January 1995). “Reference Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 27. ISBN 978-0786900923.
  22. 22.0 22.1 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 127. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  23. 23.0 23.1 Map included in Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  24. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 162. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  25. Chris Tulach (2015/03/01). Pool of Radiance Resurgent (DDEX1-13) (PDF). D&D Adventurers League: Tyranny of Dragons (Wizards of the Coast), p. 12.
  26. Robert Adducci (2015-02-05). Raiders of the Twilight Marsh (DDEX1-12) (PDF). D&D Adventurers League: Tyranny of Dragons (Wizards of the Coast), p. 2.
  27. 27.0 27.1 27.2 27.3 27.4 27.5 27.6 27.7 Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Darrin Drader, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 8. ISBN 0-7869-3915-X.
  28. 28.0 28.1 28.2 Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Darrin Drader, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 122. ISBN 0-7869-3915-X.
  29. Rand Sharpsword (September 2001). More Moonsea! (HTML). Rand's Travelogue. Wizards of the Coast. Archived from the original on 2015-09-20. Retrieved on 2010-10-31.
  30. Brian R. James and Matt James (September 2009). “Monument of the Ancients”. In Chris Youngs ed. Dungeon #170 (Wizards of the Coast), p. 53.
  31. Pieter Sleijpen (2014-08-14). Secrets of Sokol Keep (DDEX1-2) (PDF). D&D Adventurers League: Tyranny of Dragons (Wizards of the Coast), p. 7.
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  34. 34.0 34.1 Map included in John Terra (January 1995). The Moonsea. Edited by Allison Lassieur. (TSR, Inc.). ISBN 978-0786900923.
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  46. 46.0 46.1 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Edited by Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 151. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  47. 47.0 47.1 Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 64. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  48. Jeff Crook, Wil Upchurch, Eric L. Boyd (May 2005). Champions of Ruin. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 92. ISBN 0-7869-3692-4.
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  51. Warning: book within boxed set not specified for Ruins of Zhentil Keep
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  53. Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood (1990). Forgotten Realms Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 88. ISBN 0-8803-8828-5.
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  57. Reynolds, Forbeck, Jacobs, Boyd (March 2003). Races of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 108. ISBN 0-7869-2875-1.
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  60. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 99. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
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  64. John Terra (January 1995). “Reference Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 4. ISBN 978-0786900923.
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  66. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 128. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  67. Brian R. James, Ed Greenwood (September 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. Edited by Kim Mohan, Penny Williams. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 26. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
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  71. John Terra (January 1995). “Reference Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 42. ISBN 978-0786900923.
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  78. Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 29. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  79. Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 19. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
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