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Mulmaster (pronounced: /ˈməlmɑːstɛrMUHL-mah-ster[16]), also known as the City of Danger, was an independent city-state found in the harsh Moonsea region of north Faerûn. While Mulmaster controlled no land beyond its city walls for much of its history,[1] it remained an indominable fortress extolling imperialist ideals, standing among the greatest powers that imposed its will over the surrounding settlements and city-states.[3][17][18]

This is Mulmaster, a city of the Moonsea North. Look upon it, and know just how wretched human greed can be. This is a city driven by the lust for power and the greed for gold. Is it not splendid? Is it not matchless?
— Excerpt from The View From Sember Heights.[19]

Description[]

While it was a bustling and lively metropolis,[20] Mulmaster exemplified the worst consequences that arose when merciless commercial enterprise and unchecked greed took hold throughout a populace.[21][22] It was a corrupt, crime-ridden place that was just as unpleasant to walk through – due to the sickening smell of rotting fish and molten slag – as it was to try and eke out a life for oneself.[11] The stench was worst in the city's Docks Quarter, as waste and refuse literally "rolled down hill" down the docks and into Mulmaster Bay.[23]

Built within the depression formed by an arc of overbearing peaks, the city's buildings and winding streets to be built on a slant down towards the harbor.[1] The buildings nearest the docks were the most dilapidated and dangerous, full of poverty and rife with crime. Further up towards the city's walls were the more affluent areas of the city, set along the mountainside, imposing their will over the rest of Mulmaster.[24]

Even the seabed of the harbor was demonstrative of the corruption that gripped on Mulmaster, as it was literally an underwater boneyard for all those that dared cross the ruling High Blade.[25]

Weather[]

Like other cities in the region,[26] Mulmaster had to endure the harsh and unforgiving climate that permeated the Moonsea.[5] It was a city besieged on all sides, by the freezing winds that came down from the surrounding mountain slopes[27] and icy gale storms that buffeted its walls from the Moonsea lake.[1]

Geography[]

Map of Mulmaster and the surrounding area, circa 1372 DR

The city of Mulmaster located in the rugged area west of the Earthspur and Galena Mountains in the eastern part of the Moonsea region, nestled within Mulmaster Bay in the southeast of the Moonsea lake.[5][22] The lands surrounding Mulmaster were treacherous to cross and boasted many dangers to its inhabitants. The majority of the land traffic through Mulmaster came from the south, intersecting with Cormanthor, The Vast and the eastern region of the Dragon Reach. [24]

With the exception of Ironfang Keep, there were few settlements near Mulmaster in the eastern Moonsea.[24] The small farming village of Elmwood was located about two hour's travel west from the city,[28] and Masker's Eye was situated several days' travel south.[29]

The Falling Stone Mine that was located 90 mi (140 km) southeast of the city, nestled within the Earthspurs.[30]

Geographical Features[]

The city itself was built around Mulmaster Bay, the inlet of water the formed eastward from the Moonsea Lake.[31]

Like many cities, Mulmaster had a network of sewer tunnels that snaked around beneath its streets.[32][33] Even deeper still were a series of dwarven-dug tunnels referred to as the Lost Ways, subterranean passageways that were once part of the ancient realm of Sarphil.[34]

Flora & Fauna[]

Mulmaster was surrounded by a barren, rocky landscape. There was no significant plant life around the city,[17] nor parks or even trees within its walls.[1]

Government[]

Main article: Blades (Mulmaster)

Governance of Mulmaster was carried out by a ruling council of sixteen individuals known as the Blades, also known as the Council of Blades,[11][12] led by ruling High Blade. Throughout the city's history, the High Blade threatened or otherwise coerced the other members of the council, along with the Mulmasterite nobility into supporting the High Blades goals and wishes.[10] Entrance into the Blades required a confirmation vote by a majority of the council's members.[35]

Law & Order[]

Thurndan Tallwand, Senior Cloak as of 1373 DR

The City Watch of Mulmaster served as little more than hired goons for those wealthy enough to afford their services.[36] They regularly extorted their fellow Mulmasterite for "protection fees" and acted as purveyors of violence throughout the city's streets.[37]

As of the mid–14th century DR, no thieves' guilds were permitted to operate within the walls of Mulmaster. Criminal organizations that attempted to garner renown or accumulated wealth were readily hunted down by agents of the Blades.[1] Despite the city's crackdown, the poor were afforded no such protections and corruption was very much an everyday occurrence in Mulmaster.[2] [24]

Lower-leveled thieves, hired killers and black market traders could be found in every corner of Mulmaster.[38] Petty crime and other lawlessness, including drug use,[39] continued to be pervasive throughout the entirety of the city well into the late 15th century.[37][40]

Magic Regulation[]

Practitioners of magic were heavily regulated within Mulmaster, as all native spellcasters of certain power were required to join the city's official mage's guild, the Brotherhood of the Cloak. These mages and other practitioners of the Art were pressed into service as social overseers, using invasive magic to look into the minds of every day citizens to ensure their devotion to the city's ruling powers. Each of the Cloaks, as they were individually known, reported to the Cloak Council, that comprised the Mulmaster's High Blade, two councilors of the Blades, and all members of the Brotherhood of the Cloak deemed to possess power enough to garner such responsibility.[7][10][41] Those that left the organization were named traitors of the state and deemed too much a threat to be allowed to live.[1]

Society[]

Fear and loyalty are the same word.
— Common saying in Mulmaster's taverns.[42]

Mulmasterites,[43] or Mulman,[4] as people from the city were known, could perhaps best be described as stubbornly willful, determined to accomplish that to which they set out or give up their life in the process. The were exceptionally competitive, opportunistic,[27][41] and by and large exhibited one of the finest virtues of those that sought out commercial, industrial and political success in life: patience.[1]

Despite their resolute outlook on life, the unjust and harsh nature of Mulmaster led to a pessimistic attitude within its people.[28] While they strived for success within in their own city,[1] Mulmasterites were particularly antagonistic towards outsiders.[36]

Nobility[]

Members of the 49 noble houses of Mulmaster were called Zor for men, and Zora for women. The head of a noble house, regardless of gender, was a referred to as Lord.[44][5] While nobility was acquired through a combination of familial wealth and length of time spent living in the city, each conference had to be approved by a vote behind closed doors, taken by a select few members of the city's most elite citizens.[41][35][10]

Politics[]

If it's spilt blood you want to see, go you to the marketplace of any fair town. There they lie, cheat, and stick knives in each other every day. Best come early—all idle folk in every such place known how good the show is, too. The crowd of bloodthirsty onlookers can make finding a good watching-spot a mite difficult, especially for an outlander.
— Arglauth Melroryrr, Sage of Mulmaster, Arglauth's Guide to the North[45]
This is a city where everybody stiffs everybody else.
— A local tavernmaster on commerce in the city.[1]

While city of Mulmaster was firmly entrenched in the politics of the Moonsea,[10] they were widely distrusted for years due to their apparent unwillingness to hold true to their political treaties and constant expansionist mindset.[46][47]

The city maintained an embassy in the city of Ravens Bluff.[48]

Economy[]

Mulmaster suffered from a tremendous gap in wealth inequality. The powerful nobles hoarded nearly all of the city's wealth offering little else to the city's commoners who were left to live in poverty.[5] Despite the disparity, the Mulmaster's nobility as well as its temples each had to a pay a tax of 100 gp. A 10 gp tax was imposed on each sponsored caravan, while ships were levied double that fee. The nearly 100,000 individuals employed by the 10,000 Mulmasterite merchants each paid a 6 sp "head tax" every year to continue to work, lest they no longer have a head with which to be taxed.[19]

Religion[]

By the late 15th century DR, the church of Bane had become the dominant faith in the city, as its clergy offered their backing to Mulmasterite nobility.[5][49]

While Mulmaster historically beat down and tormented devotees of the deity Ilmater,[50][51] the city was one of only a handful in the Realms that tolerated the open worship of Shar.[6]

Culture[]

Interesting and troubling sights were an everyday occurrence in Mulmaster. Travelers in the city could just as readily encounter dog-fighting matches on streets, as they could exotic beasts from the Shining Lands, or worshipers of the dark gods engaging in ritualistic bouts of self-flagellation.[20]

Festivals & Holidays[]

In Mulmaster, the festival of Highharvestide was "celebrated" as "he Revel of the Reckoning, the day when each individual paid their taxes to the city. As an act of "gratitude", the High Blade hosted a grand feast for the citizenry, albeit using the funds that were just collected.[19]

Art & Fashion[]

Mulmasterites tended to wear leggings and breeches made of leather, along with heavy gauntlets, fur-lined cloaks and caps, to combat the frigid weather that permeated the city. On particularly cold winter days, they would wrap their bodies in fur aprons known as maliskers.[19][41]

Surprisingly enough, creative artistry Mulmaster enjoyed a great boom in the 1490s DR, as the city's noble families saw the growing movement as a new means to compete in their social standing with one another. Unfortunately for the city's art scene, the Blades took quick action to suppress works that were seen as "inflammatory".[52]

Food & Drink[]

Drinks that warmed the body and dulled the senses were each popular among the Mulmasterite populace, fares including blackbark tea, beer, heated spiced cider, along with fortified wines.[19]

Trade[]

Considering the city was originally founded as a fortified trading post,[17][13] commerce governed the lives of the Mulmasterite people. The city exported armor, weaponry, ships and interestingly enough jewelry to outsider towns and cities, whiling importing food, liquor, cloth and items of luxury for its own people.[9][8]

Mulmaster fed its citizens by and large through the efforts of its large fishing fleet and were offered protection from its navy.[8]

Defenses[]

The Blades commanded the armed forces known as the Soldiery,[53] numbering about 6,000 well-trained soldiers as of the the mid–14th century DR.[3][54] These soldiers were recruited from among the Mulmaster's native population for service lasting at least six years,[12] provided with excellent weaponry, training, and given exceptional pay compared to what could be earned by the city's commoners. Unlike those in some other cities, Mulmaster's citizens seldom if-ever grew lackadaisical or complacent.[55]

All the branches of Mulmaster's armed forces were commanded by the city's eight Battlemasters.[1] One each of these generals directed armed patrols outside the city, took command of the state's navy on the Moonsea lake, and oversaw protection of the city's trade caravans and dedicated bodyguards. The Watchmaster of the City served as the head of Mulmaster's city guard, while the Hawkmaster directed the activities of the city's information gathering organization. The final three Battlemasters served as seconds to the more senior of Mulmaster's generals.[55]

When the goals of the High Blade or the rest of the council could not be achieved by means of force, they relied on the secret group known as the Hawks.[12] This clandestine organization comprised a select group of spies, assassins, and saboteurs that traveled all across the Realms to help ascend Mulmaster's standing in the world.[1]

History[]

Even when it's quiet in Mulmaster, it's not really quiet–ye can hear the sound of everyone who's still awake, plotting. Always plotting.

The settlement of Mulmaster was founded in the Year of Fell Wizardry, 934 DR, as a secured trading fort linking the Moonsea region and the Dragon Reach via the River Lis.[13][17]

Mulmaster was among the Moonsea powers to contribute men and resources to repair and retake the ruined Citadel of the Raven in the Year of the Crumbling Keep, 1276 DR.[56]

After scores of adventurers went missing in Ironfang Keep for years on end, an expedition was sent from Mulmaster to investigate in the Year of the Roaring Horn, 1288 DR. This act was ultimately futile, serving only to around and incense bands of local gnolls, causing them to direct raids and assaults on the city for the next 50 years.[57]

In the Year of Thunder, 1306 DR, Mulmaster began a campaign of conquest across the Moonsea region, that came to be known as the Moonsea War. The city-state was soundly defeated by an alliance of other powers,[58] including Phlan, Hillsfar, Melvaunt, Sembia, and Zhentil Keep.[17][59]

Reign of the High Blades[]

Circa the Year of the Wandering Wyrm, 1317 DR, Mulmaster was ruled by the monarch Nesker, a sorcerer who died of old age with no apparent heir. The power vacuum created by his death led to The city's first High Blade ascending to power.[41] He was a cold and calculating man named Amdrauth Telsnaer that went to rule for a mere seven years, before being poisoned by a political rival. The next thirty years would see six different High Blades each reign over Mulmaster for a period of time, before meeting a brutal and violent death, some times at the hands of their successor.[14]

Selfaril Uoumdolphin rose to power either the Year of the Bright Blade, 1347 DR,[1] or the Year of the Spur, 1348 DR, when he destroyed the reputation of the previous High Blade Rualph Blackbuckler, challenged and slew the man in combat, and assumed the title of ruler for himself.[13][60]

High Blade Selfaril faced a resounding military defeat in the Year of the Bow, 1354 DR, when its "New Fleet" was utterly destroyed in battle by the Zhent navy.[17][61][62]

Some time before Year of the Worm, 1356 DR,[61] Selfaril his quest to seek out a suitable bride, in part to form political alliances to strengthen Mulmaster's standings in the Moonsea.[3] At first Selfaril directed his importuning towards the Simbul of Aglarond, but finally accepted her declination when she rained down fireballs upon the Towers of the Blade.[63] After that abject failure, he began to pursue Dmitra Flass, Tharchioness of Eltabbar and First Princess of Thay.[64]

The decade-long courtship proved fruitful for Mulmaster, as the two were finally set to wed in the Year of the Staff, 1366 DR.[61][65][note 1] Some time before the ceremony, High Blade Selfaril was murdered by his twin brother Rassendyll Uoumdolphin,[66] and his soul was place within the gem of the new ruler's sword.[15] Rassendyl assumes rulership of Mulmaster under the guise of his brother's identity, and carries on with the marriage to Dmitra Flass, securing the alliance with Thay.[66]

Unfortunately the public demonstration of love and coming together of different nationalities, not to mention the deft political maneuvering and fratricide, did not sit well among the Mulmasterite people, that resent growing Thayan influence within the city. The tension came to a head in Alturiak the following year when a crowd of native citizens assailed a Red Wizard delegate of Tharchioness Flass for committing some unknown transgression within the city. The Mulmasterite mob set the Thayan wizard on fire, chased down a number of other Thayan nationals, and nearly burnt down the local temple of Waukeen. A great magical battle erupted between the the city's Cloaks and the Red Wizards, with reported casualties in the hundreds.[67]

Zhent Control[]

Why are ye so happy that Zhentil Keep is undone? Now Mulmaster will rise to fill the vacancy. Believe me, that is scarcely cause for celebration!

After the destruction of Zhentil Keep in the Year of the Banner, 1368 DR, waves of refugees left their ruined city for Mulmaster.[24] The As a show of force, the Mulmasterite navy blockaded the ruined city at sea, contributing to the Keep's considerable number of woes.[68] The following year, Fzoul Chembryl formed an alliance with High Blade Rassendyll,[66] while outwardly it appeared that "Selfaril" had actually been a long-time and high-ranking agent of the Zhentarim.[68]

In 1369 DR, a pool of radiance emerged in Mulmaster, starting to consume lives of the city's residents[69]. The spawn pool originated from the ruined city of Myth Drannor where it was corrupted and abused by the Cult of the Dragon. Kya Mordrayn's cult cell spread tentacles of her corrupted pool, feeding it on cities across the Moonsea, empowering it. Subsequently the Cult's plans were shattered and its leaders slain by the Veiled Ones. With the main pool of radiance gone, Mulmaster was saved.[70]

In a twist of fate, Fzoul Chembryl and Rassendyll expertly choreographed a second great defeat of the Mulmasterite navy, presenting to outsiders a decisive victory by the Zhents. After selectively slaughtering certain members of the city's Blades council, the Zhentarim had essentially taken over as masters of Mulmaster. This secret alliance consolidated power for the two city-states, with an edge given to the Zhents.[68]

In the Year of Rogue Dragons, 1373 DR, an army of giants, ogres, and orcs led by two fire giants, formed in the lands east of Mulmaster in the Galenas.[71] They launched increasingly flagrant attacks against travelers, and began to disrupt overland trade to the city.[72]

15th Century[]

One of the districts of Mulmaster, circa 1480 DR

In the Year of the Nether Mountain Scrolls, 1486 DR, the Blades worked together with local Tymoran priests to reclaim the lost mine of Point Iron from its duergar residents. Atop the site they built the stronghold of Fort Iron, to secure the rich natural resources found within.[73]

As the zealots of Elemental Evil emerged in cities across the Heartlands in the 1490s DR, cultists of the Howling Hatred,[74] the Eternal Flame,[28] the Crushing Wave[75] and the Black Earth[76] each competed with one another for the fait of Mulmaster. Their collective experimentation with elemental nodes led to a sweltering heatwave in the summer of the Year of the Scarlet Witch, 1491 DR.[77]

In the month of Kythorn Eternal Flame used the heatwave as inspiration to unleash various fire elementals throughout the city and burn it to ashes,[78] while the Black Earth obsessively sought out the seed of fel earth underground, regardless of any the potential destruction it could cause to the city.[73] Shortly thereafter Howling Hatred formed an elemental node in the Earthspur mountains that caused high-wind storms to wrack the city,[79] and the Crushing Wave attempted to form a devastation orb at the node beneath ruined Fort Dalton to take vengeance on the city,[80] after their orb of living water was stolen from the Drowned Tower.[81]

After being uncovered in the Year of the Grinning Halfling, 1481 DR by the dwarven King Bhún Ludwakazar,[82] the magical sword containing the spirit of Selfaril Uoumdolphin, came into the possession of a band of adventurers.[83] After the blade was taken to the Tower of Arcane Might, the former High Blade of Mulmaster was freed from his century-long imprisonment.[84] The returned Selfaril immediately set out to reclaim his title of High Blade, by challenging Mulmaster's ruler Jaseen Drakehorn to a duel in single combat, with the fate of the city at stake.[85]

Rumors & Legends[]

There was an oft-shared tale about a foolish adventurer from Mulmaster that jumped on the back of a sleeping wyvern in order to slay the beast. As it took flight and twisted in the sky, the adventurer took his time to kill the beast, thinking he could glide down to the ground atop its slowly-descending serpentine corpse. Rather he was crushed by the carcass as it came plummeting down to the face of Toril.[86]

Notable locations[]

Landmarks

A map of Mulmaster in 1358 DR. (Note the incorrect orientation of the map's compass.[note 2])

  • Lighthouse, a 150 ft (46 m) tall stone-and-iron tower illuminated by continual light run by Dryn Stonewatch and his nephews.[87][88]
  • South Road Keep, an ancient keep and prison that dated back to the city's founding.[41][89][90]
  • Thayvian Embassy, this red sandstone building decorated in the Thayan style, was overseen by Ahryn Firefinger.[87][88]
  • Tower of Arcane Might, a massive wizards' tower that house the Brotherhood of the Cloak.[87]
  • Tower of the Blades, a network of towers that served as the seat of power for the Blades and the personal residences for their families.[3][8][38][91]
  • Tower of the Wyvern, the personal residence of the High Blade.[8][38][41]
Inns, Festhalls, & Taverns
  • Black Blade and Bloody Boar, a notorious and rowdy yet surprisingly affordable tavern.[1][92]
  • Flying Bed, the peaceful and tidy inn named after a peculiar prank played by a mage.[1]
  • Hammer-Felled Tree, an open-air pub.[93]
  • Leaning Boot, a drafty and poorly-cared for place in the city.[1]
  • Oxpit Tavern, the popular alehouse that offered ample platters of food to its patrons.[41][89][90]
  • Rusty Chock, a small bar near the docks that catered to sailors and dockworkers.[94]
  • Sleeping Serpent, a small, Zhentarim-controlled inn found near the docks.[95]
  • Traveler's Cloak Inn, the most spacious and perhaps expensive inn found in Mulmaster.[1][8][41]
  • Wave and Wink, the most well-known and perhaps rowdiest dancehall in the city.[89][90]
  • Windsnug Hearth[1]
Residences

A map of Mulmaster in 1373 DR.

Shops
Temples
Districts
  • Docks Quarter, the region of the city around the docks, leading up to the Traveler's Cloak inn.[104]
  • Imperial District, the heart of the city that housed the Temple of Cyric, Traveler's Cloak Inn, the Red Wizards enclave embassy, and Gate of Good Fortune.[101]
  • Zhent Quarter, the crime-filled, slums that formed outside the southern wall of the city circa 1373 DR.[88][101]
Roads
Coldharbor LaneFireball Alley

Inhabitants[]

Notable Inhabitants[]

14th Century
15th Century

Appendix[]

Notes[]

  1. The year of this event varies between various sourcebooks: Mysteries of the Moonsea (p.90) says 1368 DR while Unapproachable East (p.163) states the marriage occurred in 1370 DR.
  2. The map in Forgotten Realms Adventures (p.56) indicates the Bay of Mulmaster and the Moonsea lake are oriented north of Mulmaster. This is believed to be an error as The Moonsea (p.56) and Mysteries of the Moonsea (p.93) both orient the bay and corresponding late west of the city.

Appearances[]

Novels
Referenced only
Video Games
Neverwinter Nights: Tyrants of the Moonsea
The Parched Sea
Organized Play & Licensed Adventures
Adventurers League: Elemental Evil: (City of Danger, Embers of Elmwood, The Drowned Tower, Flames of Kythorn, Breath of the Yellow Rose, Foulness Beneath Mulmaster, Cloaks and Shadows, The Sword of Selfaril, Black Heart of Vengeance, Boltsmelter's Book)
Referenced only
Bounty in the Bog, Eye of the Tempest, Dark Rites at Fort Dalton, The Howling Void,

Further Reading[]

References[]

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 1.18 1.19 1.20 1.21 1.22 1.23 1.24 1.25 1.26 1.27 1.28 Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood (1990). Forgotten Realms Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 94. ISBN 0-8803-8828-5.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Darrin Drader, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 89. ISBN 0-7869-3915-X.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 67. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Ed Greenwood (August 1992). “The Everwinking Eye: Words To The Wise”. In Jean Rabe ed. Polyhedron #74 (TSR, Inc.), p. 14–15.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 Shawn Merwin (2015-04-01). City of Danger (DDEX2-1) (PDF). D&D Adventurers League: Elemental Evil (Wizards of the Coast), p. 4.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Ed Greenwood (October 2012). Ed Greenwood Presents Elminster's Forgotten Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 162. ISBN 0786960345.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 68. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 John Terra (January 1995). “Reference Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 57. ISBN 978-0786900923.
  9. 9.0 9.1 John Terra (January 1995). “Player's Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 31. ISBN 978-0786900923.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 10.5 Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Darrin Drader, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 90. ISBN 0-7869-3915-X.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Edited by Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, et al. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 151. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 John Terra (January 1995). “Reference Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 55. ISBN 978-0786900923.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 Brian R. James, Ed Greenwood (September 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. Edited by Kim Mohan, Penny Williams. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 112. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  14. 14.0 14.1 Brian R. James, Ed Greenwood (September 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. Edited by Kim Mohan, Penny Williams. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 135. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  15. 15.0 15.1 Daniel Helmick (2015-08-01). The Sword of Selfaril (DDEX2-14) (PDF). D&D Adventurers League: Elemental Evil (Wizards of the Coast), p. 5.
  16. Jeff Grubb, Ed Greenwood and Karen S. Martin (1987). Forgotten Realms Campaign Set (Cyclopedia of the Realms). (TSR, Inc), p. 65. ISBN 0-8803-8472-7.
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 17.3 17.4 17.5 John Terra (January 1995). “Reference Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 54. ISBN 978-0786900923.
  18. Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 17. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 19.3 19.4 Ed Greenwood (October 1991). “The Everwinking Eye: Daily Life in Mulmaster”. In Jean Rabe ed. Polyhedron #64 (TSR, Inc.), p. 20.
  20. 20.0 20.1 20.2 Will Doyle (2015-07-01). Cloaks and Shadows (DDEX2-10) (PDF). D&D Adventurers League: Elemental Evil (Wizards of the Coast), p. 10.
  21. Ed Greenwood (November 1998). The City of Ravens Bluff. (TSR, Inc), p. 2. ISBN 0-7869-1195-6.
  22. 22.0 22.1 22.2 John Terra (January 1995). “Player's Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 23. ISBN 978-0786900923.
  23. Tim Eagon (2015-06-01). Foulness Beneath Mulmaster (DDEX2-08) (PDF). D&D Adventurers League: Elemental Evil (Wizards of the Coast), p. 8.
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 24.3 24.4 Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Darrin Drader, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 88. ISBN 0-7869-3915-X.
  25. Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 63. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  26. Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Darrin Drader, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 5. ISBN 0-7869-3915-X.
  27. 27.0 27.1 John Terra (January 1995). “Player's Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 24. ISBN 978-0786900923.
  28. 28.0 28.1 28.2 Daniel Helmick (2015-03-13). Embers of Elmwood (DDEX2-02) (PDF). D&D Adventurers League: Elemental Evil (Wizards of the Coast), p. 5.
  29. Ken Hart (2015-05-01). Bounty in the Bog (DDEX2-07) (PDF). D&D Adventurers League: Elemental Evil (Wizards of the Coast), p. 7.
  30. Will Doyle (2015-04-01). Mayhem in the Earthspur Mines (DDEX2-04) (PDF). D&D Adventurers League: Elemental Evil (Wizards of the Coast), p. 12.
  31. John Terra (January 1995). “Reference Guide”. In Allison Lassieur ed. The Moonsea (TSR, Inc.), p. 23. ISBN 978-0786900923.
  32. Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Darrin Drader, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 98. ISBN 0-7869-3915-X.
  33. Tim Eagon (2015-06-01). Foulness Beneath Mulmaster (DDEX2-08) (PDF). D&D Adventurers League: Elemental Evil (Wizards of the Coast), p. 9.
  34. Ed Greenwood (October 1990). Dwarves Deep. (TSR, Inc.), p. 60. ISBN 0-88038-880-3.
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