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Myrrth was a famous Waterdhavian jester and member of the noble family Anteos in the 13th century DR. In death, he sought the help of the heroes of Selûne's Smile to investigate the defilement of his grave.[1]

AbilitiesEdit

As a skeletal colossus, Myrrth's body had a resistance to magic, a withering gaze, as well as the ability to breathe fire and ice.[3]

HistoryEdit

At some point in his career, during a performance in front of an audience of a guildmaster of Waterdeep's Musicians' Guild and his party, Myrrth used a joke written by a young jester as part of his set. Unbeknownst to him, this joke turned out to be a spell that instantly slew the jester's entire audience. The incident made Myrrth infamous, and despite the fact that he had no real hand in it, he would go on to take full credit for the act.[1][4][5]

Myrrth died from indigestion somewhere around the Year of the Killing Wave, 1257 DR, after partaking in a grand feast.[6]

About a century after his passing, in the Year of the Prince, 1357 DR, a plot was hatched by the Musicians' Guild to divine Myrrth's "killing joke" from his remains, in order to take control of all of Waterdeep. To this end, they set up the upstart breakaway Jester's Guild to rob his grave through the use of a mole, Doofut, disturbing his spirit and causing it to manifest in the Prime Material plane.[2][3][7]

In incorporeal form, Myrrth visited Selûne's Smile, seeking out adventurers to prevent his remains from being disturbed. This task was accepted by the adventurers Vajra Valmeyjar, Kyriani Agrivar, and Onyx the Invincible, with the promised reward of a valuable scroll containing the jester's original material. However, the party was beaten to the Anteos family's tomb by the Jester's Guild, who had taken Myrrth's remains to their headquarters, without the knowledge of the Musicians' Guild.[8][9][10][11]

After securing Myrrth's skeleton, the Jester's Guild's magic-users, using a series of spells in the forms of joke set-ups, turned it into a skeletal colossus, which they let loose to attack Castle Waterdeep. The guild quickly lost control over it, and Bazzle, their leader, was killed by its flame breath. After several attacks proved ineffective, the magic-users of the Jester's Guild used a series of specialized counterspells in the forms of punchlines to turn the colossus back into a normal skeleton, with Kyriani standing in for Bazzle. In the process, Myrrth's skull came loose and was caught by Onyx just before it shattered on the ground, only for it to promptly be stolen away by a member of the Musicians' Guild.[11][3]

At their headquarters, the Musicians' Guild hired a cleric of Milil to use speak with dead on Myrrth's skull to ascertain the specifics of the jester's notorious joke. The skull's demeanor stalled their progress for long enough for the heroes of Selûne's Smile to track the guild down and intervene. In the chaos of the confrontation between the heroes and the guild, the skull ended up being passed to Doofut, who was unable to shield it from Kyriani's magic missiles.[7]

With his skull destroyed, Myrrth was able to return to the afterlife once again, going on a tour of the Outer Planes starting with a gig in Ysgard. Before departing, he gave his promised reward of the valuable scroll of jokes to Onyx.[12]

AppendixEdit

NotesEdit

  1. The terms "phant" and "skeletal colossus" were used by Thomas M. Costa in the unofficial Bestiary of the Realms: Volume 2 for the incorporeal and skeletal types of undead that Myrrth turned into, respectively.

AppearancesEdit

Comics
The Spirit of MyrrthBeneath the City of the DeadShowtime! Or, Revenge of the Living MonologueDie Laughing

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Dan Mishkin, Jan Duursema (April 1989). “The Spirit of Myrrth”. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #5 (DC Comics).
  2. 2.0 2.1 Dan Mishkin, Jan Duursema (April 1989). “The Spirit of Myrrth”. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #5 (DC Comics), p. 5.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Dan Mishkin (June 1989). “Showtime! Or, Revenge of the Living Monologue”. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #7 (DC Comics).
  4. Dan Mishkin (June 1989). “Showtime! Or, Revenge of the Living Monologue”. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #7 (DC Comics), p. 24.
  5. Dan Mishkin (July 1989). “Die Laughing”. In Barbara Kesel ed. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #8 (DC Comics), pp. 1–3.
  6. Dan Mishkin, Jan Duursema (April 1989). “The Spirit of Myrrth”. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #5 (DC Comics), p. 4.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Dan Mishkin (July 1989). “Die Laughing”. In Barbara Kesel ed. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #8 (DC Comics).
  8. Dan Mishkin, Jan Duursema (April 1989). “The Spirit of Myrrth”. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #5 (DC Comics), p. 2.
  9. Dan Mishkin, Jan Duursema (April 1989). “The Spirit of Myrrth”. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #5 (DC Comics), p. 6.
  10. Dan Mishkin, Jan Duursema (April 1989). “The Spirit of Myrrth”. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #5 (DC Comics), pp. 14–15.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Dan Mishkin, Jan Duursema (May 1989). “Beneath the City of the Dead”. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #6 (DC Comics), pp. 23–24.
  12. Dan Mishkin (July 1989). “Die Laughing”. In Barbara Kesel ed. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #8 (DC Comics), pp. 22–23.
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