Myth Drannor, formerly known as the city of Cormanthor (pronounced: /kɔːrˈmɑːnθɔːrkor-MANTH-or[15]), the City of Song,[4] or the City of Love among other names,[5] was the former capital city Cormanthyr in the forest of Cormanthor.[1][14] It was considered by many to be the pinnacle of shared knowledge, culture, and civilization in Faerûn, as well a beacon of serenity and solidarity in the chaotic Realms.[16][17]

For hundreds of years after the Weeping War, Myth Drannor languished as fiend-infested ruins.[18] After hundreds of years the city was reclaimed by the elves of Evermeet in the late 14th century DR. It enjoyed a century-long renaissance,[14] before falling to ruin once more.[19]

"We shall watch guard, until Myth Drannor stands proud again!"
— Old saying in the Dales[20]

Description[edit | edit source]

The stone towers of Myth Drannor were predominantly tall and graceful in appearance, though some of those used by wizards took the shape of fantastic creatures or forms found in nature.[4] The "naturally-grown" structures of wood and plant life, formed by the Oacil'Quevan ritual of complement,[21] were among the most breath-taking in all the Realms.[4]

Cobbled streets wound through the city, running in-between the ground-level buildings of elven design and picturesque glades and city parks.[14][22] Embedded within the roads were markers for the levitation pillars, shafts of magical energy that could lift an individual to the skybridges and elegant treetop dwellings set within the canopy of Cormanthor.[23]

There was an expansive set of Dwarven Dungeons that ran underneath Myth Drannor,[citation needed] that was inter-connected with many of the subterranean dwellings that were built by the city's non-elven residents.[22]

Magic

As per its name, Myth Drannor partly defined by its protective mythal that was raised by part by the legendary spellcaster Mythanthor.[24][25] While the mythal's made the lives of its citizens more safe and convenient during its existence,[26] and even held secret powers known only to its creators.[27] Following its destruction, the mythal leaked magical energy that greatly affected the ruins and the surrounding forest of Cormanthor, in regions that came to be referred to as "Edgelands".[16][28]

Magical enhancements were prevalent throughout Myth Drannor to the point of being excessive. The city's skyways were illuminated by subtle magic fields of light resembling that reflected by the moon and spellfields that functioned for its citizens' amusement. The villas of elven nobles eschewed the use of "normal" glass, preferring theurglass that could be altered by mere touch.[23][29]

The excessive use of High magic and portals in the city, combined with the actual mythal itself, weakened the "planar fabric" of the region, granting easier access to other planes of existence and crystal spheres. Most notable among these were the Feywild, the lower planes,[30] the demiplane of Dread, along with the planet Krynn.[31] Myth Drannan portals linked the city to other destinations such as the portal nexus referred to as Abarat's folly, located within his namesake tower in the Moonsea,[32][33] the warrior's gate connected to the kingdom of Delimbiyran,[34] and most importantly, the Gate Halls nexus that link the castles of the all the great elven kingdoms. The Silversgate connected Myth Drannor to Eaerlann, while the Honorsgate led to the Forest of Mir in Tethyr.[35]

Technology

The dwarves of the House of Gems established a complex network of underground pumps, called Lifespring Wells, that provided its citizens with a reliable source of fresh water, and many of the city's beautiful fountains guarded by naiads.[36] Among other wonders of technology created by the city's dwarves was the sophisticated air vent systems that ran through all the levels of the Dwarven Dungeons and the House of Gems itself, called the Channels of the Earthborn Wind; the many winding walkways around the Castle Cormanthor and Windrider Glade; as well as the ingenious "liquid fire", used to illuminate the Dwarven Dungeons and Elven Catacombs and other city districts.[37][6]

Climate[edit | edit source]

Due to the magic of its mythal, Myth Drannor enjoyed exceptionally pleasant weather. It remained free from extreme heat or cold, and was immune to natural disasters such as storms and forest fires.[16][26]

Geography[edit | edit source]

Myth Drannor was one of four old communities of Cormanthyr, alongside the Elven Court, Semberholme, and the Tangled Trees.[38]

Myth Drannor was constructed around two tributaries that came together to form Oacenth's Stream, which flowed south through Tilver's Dam to Glyryrryl's pool in the southern end of the city.[39][40] Just north of the city proper was the Polyandrium, a network of crypts and tombs built beneath an old battlefield,[41] and the Shrine of Mystra.[42]

As of the late 15th century DR, two notable landmarks stood in stark contrast to the restored City of Song: the mold-covered fortress known as the Citadel of Fungi, and the Shadowfell-corrupted Demon Estate of the Fey'ri.[14]

Geographical Features[edit | edit source]

Myth Drannor was built in such a way that its layout resembled the head of a battleaxe, with the blade pointed to the west.[39] The western half of Myth Drannor was the older of the two, home to the "Old City" of elves as well as the "Temple" and "Lake Wards";[43][44][45] while the eastern half, named Dlarbraddath for its designer Labrad, featured numerous parks, gardens, and other sites of natural beauty, along with the homes of non-elven citizens.[46][47]

The two approximate halves were linked by the large curved bridges that spanned the streams that ran through the city in a north-south direction.[47]

Government[edit | edit source]

As I would think, so shall ye;
As I would feel, so shall ye;
As I would do, so shall ye;
As I would not harm, nor shall ye;
As I would, so shall the clan;
As the clan would, so shall I;
As we would, so shall ye.
The People are as one, and
never shall I stray from this, nor shall ye,
for to digress is to diminish you and your People.
— Code of the People[48]

Throughout most of its history, Myth Drannor and all of Cormanthyr was ruled by a single coronal. They were aided in their duties by the arms-major and spell-major, the empire's greatest warrior and mage respectively,[49][50] along with two Court Sages, chosen from among the most wise and elder of the amrathors.[51]

The authority of these leaders was each embodied in one of the three Elfblades, the Rulers' Blade, the Warblade, and the Artblade.[49][50]

Composed of the heads of Myth Drannor's elven noble houses, the Nobles' Council met regularly to discuss any issues or laws that concerned them. They met with the coronal at least once a year to offer their voice and advice to the coronal's rule.[12]

For a scant 50 years Myth Drannor was governed by the Council of Twelve, though it was little more than a collection of squabbling, entitled bureaucrats who acted only in self-interest.[52]

Laws[edit | edit source]

The laws of Myth Drannor followed the "Code of the People", simple and elegant ideal that a crime against one of its citizens was a crime against all. While the full scope of the code was over 100 stanzas long, the final words eloquently described the heart of its intent:[48]

The code was enforced either by the Coronal or an elf from one of the city's noble houses. The punishment varied on a case-by-case basis.[48]

Defenses[edit | edit source]

Beyond its namesake mythal, Myth Drannor owed its defense to the great Cormanthyrian army of Akh'Velahr along with its many great and powerful mages of the Akh'Faer.[17] The fabled amrathors of the Coronal Guard served as the city's elite protectors, some of whom practiced a unique form of sword magic.[53][54]

Service in the military was a life-long dedication, symbolized by the permanent tattoos inscribed upon a soldier or mage's hands and forearms.[1]

Throughout its history, Myth Drannor enjoyed bolstered protection from the War Wizards of Cormyr along with contingents of the kingdom's Purple Dragons.[55][56]

Relations[edit | edit source]

Myth Drannans enjoyed robust trade with the residents of the land that came to be known as Sembia,[57] along with a strong friendship the folks of the Dalelands. While elves from the city of Cormanthor first granted permission for men to settle the Dales,[58] it was the Dalesfolk who came to the city's aid during its hour of need in the 8th century DR.[55]

Within the city, guilds were formed with the goal of sharing information and knowledge between the various races of its citizenry.[48]

When the city was reformed some 700 years later, Myth Drannor renewed its bonds of camaraderie with the free folk of the Dales, along with those in the neighboring kingdom of Cormyr.[59]

Society[edit | edit source]

While Myth Drannor was the exemplification of tolerance between the races, there were some cultural traditions that separated the Tel'Quessir from non-elven citizens. For example, many elves only spoke to others of their own kind unless they were specifically addressed, the exception being moon elves and their outgoing nature. Noble-born elves were always granted right-of-way, even in the case of personal flight, and were never to be look at in the eyes, unless they did so first.[23]

The city of Myth Drannow peering from the mists of Cormanthor.

History[edit | edit source]

Myth Drannor was founded as Cormanthor in the −3983 DR by the Coronal Kahvoerm Irithyl.[60][61] For over four thousand years, the city prospered with little incident.[62][63]

Glory of Myth Drannor[edit | edit source]

Coronal Eltargrim Irithyl decided that if Cormanthyr was to survive, its people must make peace with the other races, so Eltargrim set about organizing the elf wizards to create a mythal.[2] It was completed in the Year of Soaring Stars, 261 DR,[3] and its construction marked the "Opening". The Coronal opened the city of Cormanthor to all non-Tel'Quessir, and the city was crowned Myth Drannor.[64]

The Opening marked the beginning of the Golden Age of Myth Drannor, when the city prospered and many races flourished amid its towers. Many demihuman groups came to the city during this time, including dwarves, gnomes, and halflings.[65] Myth Drannor reached a peak of influence and culture in the Year of the Bloody Tusk, 661 DR, and all the races living within flourished under a sense of unity.[66]

Following the death of Eltargrim in the Year of the Bloody Tusk, 661 DR,[67][68] the city was left without a leader. By Midsummer in the Year of Austere Ceremonies, 667 DR, the Council of Twelve was in control of Cormanthyr and Myth Drannor.[52][67][69] This council soon forgot the dreams of the Coronals, focusing on actions that favored their own families and influence. With Myth Drannor failing as a capital, the next 40 years saw Cormanthyr dissolve into city-states rife with divisive in-fighting that poisoned the city's council and the guilds.[70]

Fall[edit | edit source]

Main article: Weeping War

In the Year of Despairing Elves, 711 DR, the Trio Nefarious entered the northern woods, attacking some eladrin outposts and moving closer to the capital, and starting the Weeping War.[71] The elves of the city were aided in its defense by the men of the Dalelands and some Cormyrean War Wizards.[55] Unfortunately by the Year of Doom, 714 DR, Myth Drannor was overrun by the Army of Darkness.[72][73][74][71]

Myth Drannor's former residents scattered across the Realms. Some elves found new homes in the land of Tethyr by the grace of Strohm II.[75][76]

The fall of Myth Drannor began an event that came to be known as the Retreat – the great migration of elves from the continent of Faerûn to the isle of Evermeet.[77] Among those that were known to have returned to the Green Isle were the elven houses of Durothil, Silverspear,[78] Symbaern, Nightstar,[79] and Nierdre.[80]

Interim years[edit | edit source]

An osyluth and a hamatula in the ruins of Myth Drannor.

For over six centuries, the elves kept the place hidden and sealed for the most part, refusing to let any into the ruins save dragons, whom the elves hoped would guard the city against interlopers as they would their own lairs[81] The city became a legend, one of the most dangerous adventuring sites in all of Faerûn.[82]

During the 13th century DR, the deity Lathander appeared before a group of his clergy that came to be known as the Speakers of the Dawn. He tasked them with the formation of a Lathanderite temple within the ruins of Myth Drannor and bestowed upon them the Dawnstone to aid them in their endeavor.[83]

In the same year that the elves' Retreat reached its apex,[82] in the Year of Moonfall, 1344 DR, the Cult of the Dark Naga were lured to Myth Drannor by the lich Druth Daern. The nagara were slain by the phaerimm, and subsequently raised as bone nagas as servants. With the undead army at his disposal, Druth had power that rivaled the fiends and undead illithids that dwelled within the ruins.[84][85]

A mere two years later, in the Year of the Bloodbird, 1346 DR, the alhoons had manipulated the church of Bane into opening a portal to Avernus within the ruins in an effort to set ther devils upon their phaerimm enemies.[86][81] The archdevil Malkizid intervened however, keeping the portal open for hordes of baatezu to pour forth into the Realms.[87] The Banites quickly erected magical wards to contain the fields, hoping that adventurers would slay some of their number.[87]

The Seizing[edit | edit source]

Castle Cormanthor during the Cult of the Dragon occupation.

Over the next ten years, the followers of Bane spread rumors about the great riches that could be obtained from within Myth Drannor.[87] Many adventuring bands made forays into the city's ruins,[88] in search of wealth and glory. Notable among these groups were the Company of the Catlash,[89] and the Masked Marauders.[90] Other groups were more benevolent in their motivations. The Knights of the Shadow Sword made regular patrols in the city, seeking to rid it of its evil denizens,[91] while the Knights of Myth Drannor relocated there in the years prior to their retirement.[92]

In the Year of the Prince, 1357 DR, an avatar of Moander marched on Myth Drannor from Yûlash; while it was prevented from reaching its destination,[93] the destruction it caused formed a path in the forest called Moander's Road.[94][95]

A few months later in Marpenoth, the entity known as Tyranthraxus briefly took over the city by means of a pool of radiance and established itself within the temple of Labelas Enoreth. With the assistance of a disguised Elminster, a group of adventurers found passage through Myth Drannor's barriers and drove the possessing spirit out of the ruined city.[96]

The following month in Uktar, the Knights of Myth Drannor managed to close the portal established by the followers of Bane a decade before. Unfortunately, scores of devils remained within the ruins.[87]

Twelve years after that, in the Year of the Gauntlet, 1369 DR,[87] the Cult of the Dragon gained a foothold in the city, under the leadership of Kya Mordrayn.[97] They had discovered a newly formed pool of radiance inside Castle Cormanthor and wished to bathe the dracolich Pelendralaar in its waters to grant him more power. Once again, the malevolent plans of those seeking to exploit Myth Drannor were foiled by adventurers of the Realms.[87]

Reclamation and Reconstruction[edit | edit source]

In the Year of Wild Magic, 1372 DR, the return of the Netherese to Faerûn led to the expedient destruction of the phaerimm that dwelled within the city's ruins. The returned arcanists erected a shadowshell that prevented the their escape and nearly eradicated the aberrations from within the ruins.[98]

Two years later, in the Year of Lightning Storms, 1374 DR, the forces of the daemonfey managed a feat that so many others could not – they conquered the ruined city by force. In turn, Seiveril Miritar and the Elven Crusade returned to Faerûn from Evermeet to reclaim Myth Drannor for the Tel'Quessir from the fiendish plague.[99] Seiveril's daughter Ilsevele became the new coronal and efforts to restore the city began.[100][101][102] The elves of the region began to clear the ruins of Myth Drannor, in order to build the city anew.[103]

By the following year, Myth Drannor became a flourishing city-state that garnered influence over several Moonsea and Dalelands settlements.[14] Unfortunately, that was also the year in which agents of returned Netheril managed to recover the Nether Scrolls from Windsong Tower. The restored City of Song and the returned Empire of Netheril entered into a non-warring conflict with one another,[14] that hearkened to the original discovery of the Nether Scrolls and their abandonment of the magic taught to them by the elves of Eaerlann.[104]

After over a century of tension and conflict, war broke out in the Eastern Heartlands.[105] The Netherese enclave of Thultanthar took to the air directly over Myth Drannor as the Netherese shades sought to take control over its mythal. During the struggle, Thultanthar crashed down upon Myth Drannor, leveling both of the cities upon impact.[106] Coronal Ilsevele managed to survive the catastrophe, and her subjects fled to formerly-abandoned settlement of Semberholme.[107]

Legacy[edit | edit source]

At its height, Myth Drannor represented the peak of elven civilization and craftsmanship. It served as a beacon for the free folks of Faerûn, particularly the elves, dwarves, and humans, demonstrating they could peacefully live alongside one another.[108][109]

Throughout the years it lay in ruin, leaders from several city-states sought recapture its splendor and beauty.[110] Cities such as Ascalhorn and Silverymoon were seen by some as resonances of the City of Song.[111][112] Some even referred to Silverymoon as "Myth Drannor of the North".[113][114]

Relics that survived the destruction of Myth Drannor were highly prized throughout the Realms.[115] The Old Dragon Down in Archenbridge earned some renown for selling these types of items,[116] while a single bottle of wine recovered from the city was considered priceless by the proprietor of Thaola's Wineshop in Leuthilspar on the island of Evermeet.[117] Some relics known to have survived the city's fall included a number of enchanted harps,[118][119] the Black Book of Beshaba,[120] Gaulguth's battleaxe Heartcleaver,[121] Arbane's swords of agility,[122] and the legendary baneblades of Demron forged to commemorate the unity forged among the city's residents, among others.[123]

Countless other types of magic items traced their origins back to the city, including the gauntlets of the valorous, daggers of defiance,[124] and of course the legendary moonblades.[125]

Rumors & Legends[edit | edit source]

According to Volothamp Geddarm, Myth Drannor was one of the possible locations in the Realms where the well of spells could appear.[126]

Seeing as how many great magical items traced their history back to Myth Drannor, many rumors surrounding misplaced or long-lost relics pointed in the direction of the fabled city. As of the mid–14th century DR it was rumored at the Wyvern Crown of Cormyr rest somewhere within its ruins.[127]

Notable locations[edit | edit source]

The city comprised four distinct districts,[128] and a vast underground network referred to as the Dwarven Dungeons.[citation needed]

Myth Drannor, City of Song[edit | edit source]

Cormanthor

The "Old City" was the oldest ward that housed the city's austere civil buildings and estates of the noble elven houses.[43] Notable sites included:

Sheshyrinnam

The "Temple Ward" was nearly as old as Cormanthor, housing many elven citizens and the temples of the Seldarine.[44]

Kerradunath

The "Lake Ward" was home to the many businesses and guildhalls built around the tranquil Glyrryl's pool.[45]

Dlabraddath

Also known as the "Alliance Ward", this region was constructed after the "Opening" in order to accommodate the non-elven residents that made their home in Myth Drannor.[46][59]

Dwarven Dungeons
Other

Ruins of Myth Drannor[edit | edit source]

In the centuries following the city's destruction, a number of structures were taken over by various warring factions. Some were demolished entirely while others were rededicated to serve other purposes.

Landmarks
Ruins
  • Stillwater Ruins, was the area that housed a fountain with magic healing waters and once served as the gate to the areas surrounding Castle Cormanthor.[141]
Temples
  • Dawnspire, the Lathanderite temple that was erected by the Seekers of the Dawn.[83]

Inhabitants[edit | edit source]

During the height of its splendor, Myth Drannor was home to some of the most famous and knowledgeable of the Realms' residents. The Seven Wizards who taught at the city's school of magic had a lasting legacy that influenced practitioners of the Art for centuries to follow.[143][144][145]

The city attracted artists, scholars craftspeople from all across the Realms. A person was just as likely to find a learned sage or world-traveled bard as they were to encounter an artificer of fantastic magic items.[146]

In the Ruins

Following its destruction in the 8th century DR, Myth Drannor became overrun by many monstrous, aberrant, and horrific creatures. Entities known as wizshades haunted the city's once-majestic wizard-towers,[47] while dweomervores sought out magical power to consume for sustenance.[147] Interestingly enough, the city's ruins was the location for the first sightings of the rarely-seen fang dragons.[148]

Also in the ruins were undead horrors rarely encountered by mortals – magic-wielding illithids known as alhoons,[149] burnbones,[150] and an army bone nagas.[84][85][151] Not all the undead in ruined Myth Drannor were malevolent however, as the baelnorn remained as vigilant sentries watching over the tombs of their deceased kin.[152][153]

The more aberrant denizens included the horrific phaerimm that escaped from beneath Anauroch,[154][155] and a single deepspawn that took control of the ruined Speculum.[20]

Through the centuries of ruin devils and other fiends run rampant through Myth Drannor. One contingent of baatezu once fell under the command of the fallen solar Malkizid,[139][156] while another was led by the pit fiend Aglaeroch.[32]

Appendix[edit | edit source]

Adventures
Curse of the Azure BondsPool of Radiance: Attack on Myth Drannor
Novels
Elminster in Myth DrannorForsaken HouseFarthest ReachFinal GateThe Herald
Card Games
Spellfire: Master the Magic
Video Games
Curse of the Azure Bonds (game)Eye of the Beholder III: Assault on Myth DrannorPool of Radiance: Ruins of Myth Drannor

Gallery[edit | edit source]

Maps

Further Reading[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 54. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 4. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 5. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 133. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  5. 5.0 5.1 James Butler, Elizabeth T. Danforth, Jean Rabe (September 1994). “Cormanthor”. In Karen S. Boomgarden ed. Elminster's Ecologies (TSR, Inc), p. 5. ISBN 1-5607-6917-3.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8 Stormfront Studios (2001). Designed by Mark Buchignani, Ken Eklund, Sarah W. Stocker. Pool of Radiance: Ruins of Myth Drannor. Ubisoft Entertainment.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Eric L. Boyd (September 2007). “Volo's Guide: Myth Drannor, City of Song”. In Erik Mona ed. Dragon #359 (Paizo Publishing, LLC), p. 359.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 70. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  9. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 143. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  10. Ed Greenwood (August 1992). “The Everwinking Eye: Words To The Wise”. In Jean Rabe ed. Polyhedron #74 (TSR, Inc.), p. 14–15.
  11. Richard Baker (August 12th, 2008). The one and only "Ask the Realms authors/designers thread" 4. Retrieved on January 8th, 2009.
  12. 12.0 12.1 Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 46. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  13. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 45. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.5 14.6 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 156. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  15. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 127. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 James Butler, Elizabeth T. Danforth, Jean Rabe (September 1994). “Cormanthor”. In Karen S. Boomgarden ed. Elminster's Ecologies (TSR, Inc), p. 5. ISBN 1-5607-6917-3.
  17. 17.0 17.1 Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 57. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  18. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 125. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  19. Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 12. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  20. 20.0 20.1 Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 21. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  21. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 135. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  22. 22.0 22.1 Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 64. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  23. 23.0 23.1 23.2 Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 60. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  24. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 45. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  25. Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 24. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  26. 26.0 26.1 Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 27. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  27. Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 29. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  28. James Butler, Elizabeth T. Danforth, Jean Rabe (September 1994). “Cormanthor”. In Karen S. Boomgarden ed. Elminster's Ecologies (TSR, Inc), p. 13. ISBN 1-5607-6917-3.
  29. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 61. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  30. Reynolds, Forbeck, Jacobs, Boyd (March 2003). Races of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 40. ISBN 0-7869-2875-1.
  31. Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 26. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  32. 32.0 32.1 Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Darrin Drader, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 84. ISBN 0-7869-3915-X.
  33. Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Darrin Drader, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 86. ISBN 0-7869-3915-X.
  34. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 144. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  35. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 62. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  36. 36.0 36.1 Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 18. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  37. Pool of Radiance: Ruins of Myth Drannor official webpage (archived). (18-10-2020). Retrieved on 18-10-2020.
  38. Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 38. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  39. 39.0 39.1 Warning: book within boxed set not specified for The Ruins of Myth Drannor
  40. 40.0 40.1 40.2 40.3 Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 16. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  41. Sean K. Reynolds (2000). Pool of Radiance: Attack on Myth Drannor. Edited by Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 16. ISBN 0-7869-1710-5.
  42. Sean K. Reynolds (2000). Pool of Radiance: Attack on Myth Drannor. Edited by Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 13. ISBN 0-7869-1710-5.
  43. 43.0 43.1 Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 71. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  44. 44.0 44.1 Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 74. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  45. 45.0 45.1 45.2 Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 77. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  46. 46.0 46.1 46.2 Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 79. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  47. 47.0 47.1 47.2 Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 19. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  48. 48.0 48.1 48.2 48.3 Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 59. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  49. 49.0 49.1 Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 135. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  50. 50.0 50.1 Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 157. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  51. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 58. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  52. 52.0 52.1 Steven E. Schend (1998). The Fall of Myth Drannor. (TSR, Inc), p. 7. ISBN 0-7869-1235-9.
  53. Rob Heinsoo, Logan Bonner, Robert J. Schwalb (September 2008). Forgotten Realms Player's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 24. ISBN 978-0-7869-4929-8.
  54. Rob Heinsoo, Logan Bonner, Robert J. Schwalb (September 2008). Forgotten Realms Player's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 48. ISBN 978-0-7869-4929-8.
  55. 55.0 55.1 55.2 Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds (Nov. 2005). Champions of Valor. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 62. ISBN 0-7869-3697-5.
  56. Rob Heinsoo, Logan Bonner, Robert J. Schwalb (September 2008). Forgotten Realms Player's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 115. ISBN 978-0-7869-4929-8.
  57. Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 38. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  58. Richard Baker (1993). The Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 3. ISBN 978-1560766674.
  59. 59.0 59.1 Rob Heinsoo, Logan Bonner, Robert J. Schwalb (September 2008). Forgotten Realms Player's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 114. ISBN 978-0-7869-4929-8.
  60. Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 27. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  61. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 33. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  62. Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 53. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  63. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 35. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  64. Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 68. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  65. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 56. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  66. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 31. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  67. 67.0 67.1 Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 94. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  68. Steven E. Schend (1998). The Fall of Myth Drannor. (TSR, Inc), p. 4. ISBN 0-7869-1235-9.
  69. Steven E. Schend (1998). The Fall of Myth Drannor. (TSR, Inc), p. 17. ISBN 0-7869-1235-9.
  70. Steven E. Schend (1998). The Fall of Myth Drannor. (TSR, Inc), pp. 7–8. ISBN 0-7869-1235-9.
  71. 71.0 71.1 Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 99. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  72. Richard Baker (August 2004). Forsaken House. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 1–2. ISBN 0-7869-3260-0.
  73. Steven E. Schend (1998). The Fall of Myth Drannor. (TSR, Inc), p. 19. ISBN 0-7869-1235-9.
  74. Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), pp. 6–7. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  75. Steven E. Schend (1997). Lands of Intrigue: Book One: Tethyr. (TSR, Inc.), p. 3. ISBN 0-7869-0697-9.
  76. Steven E. Schend (1997). Lands of Intrigue: Book One: Tethyr. (TSR, Inc.), p. 33. ISBN 0-7869-0697-9.
  77. Reynolds, Forbeck, Jacobs, Boyd (March 2003). Races of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 27. ISBN 0-7869-2875-1.
  78. Anne Gray McCready et al. (March 1994). Elves of Evermeet. (TSR, Inc), p. 38. ISBN 1-5607-6829-0.
  79. Anne Gray McCready et al. (March 1994). Elves of Evermeet. (TSR, Inc), p. 39. ISBN 1-5607-6829-0.
  80. Anne Gray McCready et al. (March 1994). Elves of Evermeet. (TSR, Inc), p. 40. ISBN 1-5607-6829-0.
  81. 81.0 81.1 Eric L. Boyd (September 2007). “Volo's Guide: Myth Drannor, City of Song”. In Erik Mona ed. Dragon #359 (Paizo Publishing, LLC), p. 102.
  82. 82.0 82.1 Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 8. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  83. 83.0 83.1 Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 81. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  84. 84.0 84.1 Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 93. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  85. 85.0 85.1 Ed Greenwood, Eric L. Boyd, Darrin Drader (July 2004). Serpent Kingdoms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 113. ISBN 0-7869-3277-5.
  86. Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 69. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  87. 87.0 87.1 87.2 87.3 87.4 87.5 Eric L. Boyd (September 2007). “Volo's Guide: Myth Drannor, City of Song”. In Erik Mona ed. Dragon #359 (Paizo Publishing, LLC), p. 103.
  88. Ed Greenwood (January 1996). Volo's Guide to the Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 7. ISBN 0-7869-0406-2.
  89. Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 72. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  90. Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 78. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  91. Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds (Nov. 2005). Champions of Valor. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 49. ISBN 0-7869-3697-5.
  92. Richard Baker (1993). The Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 54. ISBN 978-1560766674.
  93. Jeff Grubb and Kate Novak (March 1991). Song of the Saurials. (TSR, Inc). ISBN 1-5607-6060-5.
  94. Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 39. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  95. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 124. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  96. Jeff Grubb and George MacDonald (April 1989). Curse of the Azure Bonds. (TSR, Inc.), pp. 77–79. ISBN 978-0880386067.
  97. Sean K. Reynolds (2000). Pool of Radiance: Attack on Myth Drannor. Edited by Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 11. ISBN 0-7869-1710-5.
  98. Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 153. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  99. Ed Greenwood, Eric L. Boyd (March 2006). Power of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 28. ISBN 0-7869-3910-9.
  100. Richard Baker (June 2006). Final Gate. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 0-7869-4002-6.
  101. Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 155–159. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  102. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 156–157. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  103. Eric L. Boyd (September 2007). “Volo's Guide: Myth Drannor, City of Song”. In Erik Mona ed. Dragon #359 (Paizo Publishing, LLC), p. 105.
  104. slade, James Butler (November 1996). Netheril: Empire of Magic (The Winds of Netheril). (TSR, Inc.), p. 5. ISBN 0-7869-0437-2.
  105. Christopher Perkins, et al. (August 2013). Ghosts of Dragonspear Castle. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 143. ISBN 978-0786965311.
  106. Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 18. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  107. Warning: edition not specified for The Herald
  108. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 3. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  109. Ed Greenwood (1993). The Code of the Harpers. (TSR, Inc), p. 3. ISBN 1-56076-644-1.
  110. Ed Greenwood (1987). Waterdeep and the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 5. ISBN 0-88038-490-5.
  111. Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 164. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  112. Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 211. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  113. Ed Greenwood and Jason Carl (July 2002). Silver Marches. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 57. ISBN 0-7869-2835-2.
  114. Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 53. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  115. Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 40. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  116. Ed Greenwood (January 1996). Volo's Guide to the Dalelands. (TSR, Inc), p. 20. ISBN 0-7869-0406-2.
  117. Anne Gray McCready et al. (March 1994). Elves of Evermeet. (TSR, Inc), p. 44. ISBN 1-5607-6829-0.
  118. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 151. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  119. Ed Greenwood (November 1986). “Airs of Ages Past”. In Roger E. Moore ed. Dragon #115 (TSR, Inc.), pp. 46–47.
  120. Ed Greenwood and Doug Stewart (1997). Prayers from the Faithful. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 12. ISBN 0-7869-0682-0.
  121. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 121. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  122. Sean K. Reynolds, Duane Maxwell, Angel McCoy (August 2001). Magic of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 168. ISBN 0-7869-1964-7.
  123. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 120. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  124. Sean K. Reynolds, Duane Maxwell, Angel McCoy (August 2001). Magic of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 142. ISBN 0-7869-1964-7.
  125. Anne Gray McCready et al. (March 1994). Elves of Evermeet. (TSR, Inc), p. 70. ISBN 1-5607-6829-0.
  126. Ed Greenwood, Eric L. Boyd (1996). Volo's Guide to All Things Magical. (TSR, Inc), p. 5. ISBN 0-7869-0446-1.
  127. Ed Greenwood, Eric L. Boyd (1996). Volo's Guide to All Things Magical. (TSR, Inc), p. 122. ISBN 0-7869-0446-1.
  128. Poster map included in Steven E. Schend, Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc). ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  129. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 70. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  130. 130.0 130.1 Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 17. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  131. 131.0 131.1 Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 73. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  132. Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 99. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  133. 133.0 133.1 Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 76. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  134. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 156. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  135. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 75. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  136. Jeff Grubb, Ed Greenwood and Karen S. Martin (1987). Forgotten Realms Campaign Set (DM's Sourcebook of the Realms). (TSR, Inc), p. 46. ISBN 0-8803-8472-7.
  137. Steven E. Schend and Kevin Melka (1998). Cormanthyr: Empire of the Elves. (TSR, Inc), p. 82. ISBN 0-7069-0761-4.
  138. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 128. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  139. 139.0 139.1 Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 20. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  140. Sean K. Reynolds (2000). Pool of Radiance: Attack on Myth Drannor. Edited by Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 16–17. ISBN 0-7869-1710-5.
  141. 141.0 141.1 Stormfront Studios (2001). Designed by Mark Buchignani, Ken Eklund, Sarah W. Stocker. Pool of Radiance: Ruins of Myth Drannor. Ubisoft Entertainment.
  142. Ed Greenwood and Doug Stewart (1997). Prayers from the Faithful. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 4. ISBN 0-7869-0682-0.
  143. Ed Greenwood, Tim Beach (1995). Pages from the Mages. (TSR, Inc), p. 88. ISBN 0-7869-0183-7.
  144. Ed Greenwood, Tim Beach (1995). Pages from the Mages. (TSR, Inc), p. 92. ISBN 0-7869-0183-7.
  145. Ed Greenwood, Tim Beach (1995). Pages from the Mages. (TSR, Inc), p. 124. ISBN 0-7869-0183-7.
  146. Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 39. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  147. Eric L. Boyd (June 2005). City of Splendors: Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 135. ISBN 0-7869-3693-2.
  148. James Wyatt and Rob Heinsoo (February 2001). Monster Compendium: Monsters of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 42. ISBN 0-7869-1832-2.
  149. Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 61. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  150. Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Monstrous Compendium). (TSR, Inc), p. 3. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  151. Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 91. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  152. Anne Gray McCready et al. (March 1994). Elves of Evermeet. (TSR, Inc), p. 90. ISBN 1-5607-6829-0.
  153. James Wyatt and Rob Heinsoo (February 2001). Monster Compendium: Monsters of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 90. ISBN 0-7869-1832-2.
  154. Ed Greenwood (March 1993). “Campaign Guide to Myth Drannor”. In Newton H. Ewell ed. The Ruins of Myth Drannor (TSR, Inc.), p. 36. ISBN 1-5607-6569-0.
  155. James Wyatt and Rob Heinsoo (February 2001). Monster Compendium: Monsters of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 70. ISBN 0-7869-1832-2.
  156. Jeff Crook, Wil Upchurch, Eric L. Boyd (May 2005). Champions of Ruin. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 155. ISBN 0-7869-3692-4.
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