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Ninjas used deception, ki powers, and martial arts to defeat their enemies, gather information, and steal secrets. Though they lacked the outright combat prowess of fighters and barbarians, they were adept at bringing foes to battle on their own terms, seeming to appear and disappear at will.[5] In Shou Lung, the term "vagabond" often referred to ninjas.[1]

Culture[]

Highly secretive, the ninja class was a class shrouded in mystery and superstition, a reputation ninja encourage. Individuals of other classes, such as bushi, geisha[8], wu jen or sohei, were able to learn the skills of the ninja. [9] Chirasu is the patron deity of ninjas. Most of her shrines were built by ninja families and clans.[10] Ninja were almost always human.[11]

Honor was revered by ninja, as it was how their reliability was gauged. The ninja maintained not only their own honor, but the honor of their family or clan. The primary ways a ninja could being dishonor upon themselves or clan was to be identified or to fail in a mission. Depending on the severity of the failure, the ninja was either demoted to nukenin or executed.[12]

Organization[]

Nearly all ninja were members of a ninja clan. The name of the clan was normally the one of its dominant family. These clans were secretive and often not even publicly known as a ninja clan. Each clan had a specialization. For example, some clans specialized in assassinations and others were known for being master spies.[13]

Ninja clans operated in specific territories. In rural areas of Kara-Tur, one clan only may be found in an area, and often ruled entire villages. In the cities, various clans competed for missions and power, and had the same power as guilds.[13]

A clan was ruled by a single lord. The lord would often have one or two trusted leaders as their trusted advisors, called jonin. Each clan was composed of one or more families, each ruled by a chunin. The lowest-ranked ninja were called genin.[11] A ninja who brought dishonor on their family or clan was called a nukenin.[12]

Ninja had their own secret language, similar to thieves' cant used by rogues, called clan signs. Using clan sign, a ninja was able to communicate complex sentences. Clan signs varied from clan to clan, so a ninja from one clan was not able to understand the clan sign from a different clan.[14]

Known Ninja Clans[]

Abilities[]

The ninja's abilities were focused on spying and assasination. They were highly skilled combatants, proficient in several martial arts skills and weapons use. They also were adapt spellcasters, able to cast a number of efficient spells using kuji-kiri hand gestures.[22]

History[]

In Faerûn, the ninja arts, or ninjutsu, were believed to have originated on the eastern continent of Kara-Tur.[1] In Kozakura, ninja clans had great power and are feared and respected.[23]

Notable Ninja[]

Appendix[]

See Also[]

Notes[]

  1. In the 3rd-edition sourcebook Oriental Adventures, ninja spy was a prestige class, but the book also noted that not all ninjas were ninja spies; some used the assassin prestige class instead.

Further reading[]

External Links[]

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Curtis Smith and Rick Swan (1990). Ronin Challenge. (TSR, Inc), p. 2. ISBN 0-88038-749-1.
  2. Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume I). (TSR, Inc), p. 16. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  3. Mike Mearls, Claudio Pozas, Robert J. Schwalb (April 2011). Player's Option: Heroes of Shadow. Edited by Michelle Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 15. ISBN 978-0-7869-5745-3.
  4. Dave Chalker (October 2011). “Class Acts: Assassin: Secrets of the Ninja”. In Christopher Perkins ed. Dragon # (404), p. 1.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Jesse Decker (January 2005). Complete Adventurer. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 5–10. ISBN ISBN 0-7869-3651-7.
  6. Aaron Allston (1995). The Complete Ninja's Handbook. Edited by Barbara G. Young. (TSR, Inc), pp. 5–11. ISBN 0786901594.
  7. Gary Gygax, David Cook, and François Marcela-Froideval (1985). Oriental Adventures. (TSR, Inc), pp. 14, 19–21. ISBN 0-8803-8099-3.
  8. Gregg Sharp (May 1987). “The Geisya”. In Roger E. Moore ed. Dragon #121 (TSR, Inc.), p. 39.
  9. Gary Gygax, David Cook, and François Marcela-Froideval (1985). Oriental Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 19. ISBN 0-8803-8099-3.
  10. Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume II). (TSR, Inc), p. 146. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Aaron Allston (1995). The Complete Ninja's Handbook. Edited by Barbara G. Young. (TSR, Inc), p. 95. ISBN 0786901594.
  12. 12.0 12.1 Gary Gygax, David Cook, and François Marcela-Froideval (1985). Oriental Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 21. ISBN 0-8803-8099-3.
  13. 13.0 13.1 Aaron Allston (1995). The Complete Ninja's Handbook. Edited by Barbara G. Young. (TSR, Inc), p. 91. ISBN 0786901594.
  14. Aaron Allston (1995). The Complete Ninja's Handbook. Edited by Barbara G. Young. (TSR, Inc), p. 7. ISBN 0786901594.
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume II). (TSR, Inc), p. 125. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  16. David "Zeb" Cook (1987). Blood of the Yakuza. (TSR, Inc), p. 20. ISBN 0-88038-401-8.
  17. Nigel Findley (1990). Ninja Wars. (TSR, Inc), p. 77. ISBN 0-8803-8895-1.
  18. 18.0 18.1 Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume II). (TSR, Inc), p. 152. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  19. Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume I). (TSR, Inc), p. 23. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  20. David "Zeb" Cook (1987). Blood of the Yakuza. (TSR, Inc), p. 21. ISBN 0-88038-401-8.
  21. 21.0 21.1 Nigel Findley (1990). Ninja Wars. (TSR, Inc), p. 64. ISBN 0-8803-8895-1.
  22. Aaron Allston (1995). The Complete Ninja's Handbook. Edited by Barbara G. Young. (TSR, Inc), p. 16. ISBN 0786901594.
  23. Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume II). (TSR, Inc), p. 142. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  24. Jon Pickens, et al. (December 1986). Night of the Seven Swords. Edited by Karen S. Martin. (TSR, Inc.), p. 15. ISBN 0-88038-327-5.
  25. Jeff Grubb (1987). Ochimo: The Spirit Warrior. (TSR, Inc), p. 27. ISBN 0-88038-393-3.
  26. 26.0 26.1 Jeff Grubb (1988). Mad Monkey vs the Dragon Claw. (TSR, Inc). ISBN 0-88038-624-X.
  27. Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume II). (TSR, Inc), p. 121. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  28. David "Zeb" Cook (1986). Swords of the Daimyo. (TSR, Inc), p. 20. ISBN 0-88038-273-2.
  29. David "Zeb" Cook (1987). Blood of the Yakuza. (TSR, Inc), p. 5. ISBN 0-88038-401-8.
  30. Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume II). (TSR, Inc), p. 133. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  31. David "Zeb" Cook (1987). Blood of the Yakuza. (TSR, Inc), p. 23. ISBN 0-88038-401-8.
  32. David Cook (1986). Swords of the Daimyo (Province Book of Miyama). (TSR, Inc), p. 25. ISBN 0-88038-273-2.
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