Nymphs were fey that typically resembled Tel-quessir women, not just physically beautiful, but literally blindingly so. They usually dwelt in forests, streams, waterfalls, or coves. They were the guardians and protectors of these and the portals to the faerie realm. It was said that their beauty could lead anyone who gazed upon them either blindness, madness, or even death. However, they could suppress this ability if they wished. They absolutely hated anything that was either evil or ugly.[citation needed]

Their queen was more powerful than their king. They had the ability to wield the power of nature. They celebrated many different festivals. They tended to live near hollow hills. They were immortal.[citation needed]

Description[edit | edit source]

They were very similar to wood elves in most cases; for instance, they had markedly pointed ears. Nymphs were always female, possessing incredible beauty that was dangerous to behold. As such, they were the frequent target of satyrs and lecherous human males.[citation needed]

Personality[edit | edit source]

Some considered nymphs to be the most wild and capricious race of fey.[5]

Society[edit | edit source]

Nymphs in cold climates were often known to hunt upon the backs of wolves.[1]

Homelands[edit | edit source]

Compared to Faerûn, nymphs were a more common occurrence on the Evermeet, though still relatively rare. There they inhabited forests, glades, and valleys.[6]

In the Zakhara region's Crowded Sea, nymphs could be found on the island chain of Nada al-Hazan[7] and the archipelago of Jazayir al-Sartan.[8]

Relationships[edit | edit source]

Nymphs were sometimes sent as agents of the elven gods Corellon Larethian or Erevan Ilesere.[9]

Among the elves that inhabited Evermeet, nymphs were viewed as being spiritual representatives of the elven gods and they in turn seemed to be positively inclined towards them, rarely harming elves. Some of the island's elves, especially those of the green and silver variety, purposely sought them out.[10]

Gallery[edit | edit source]

Appendix[edit | edit source]

See Also[edit | edit source]

Appearances[edit | edit source]

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Further Reading[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Mike Mearls, Greg Bilsland and Robert J. Schwalb (June 15, 2010). Monster Manual 3 4th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 151–153. ISBN 0786954902.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 Skip Williams, Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook (July 2003). Monster Manual v.3.5. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 197. ISBN 0-7869-2893-X.
  3. Doug Stewart (June 1993). Monstrous Manual. (TSR, Inc), p. 270. ISBN 1-5607-6619-0.
  4. Gary Gygax (December 1977). Monster Manual, 1st edition. (TSR, Inc), p. 74. ISBN 0-9356-9600-8.
  5. Mike Mearls, Greg Bilsland and Robert J. Schwalb (June 15, 2010). Monster Manual 3 4th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 150. ISBN 0786954902.
  6. Anne Gray McCready et al. (March 1994). Elves of Evermeet. (TSR, Inc), p. 31. ISBN 1-5607-6829-0.
  7. David Cook (October 1992). “Nada al-Hazan”. In Bill Slavicsek ed. Golden Voyages (TSR, Inc.), p. 2. ISBN 978-1560763314.
  8. David Cook (October 1992). “Al-Sartan”. In Bill Slavicsek ed. Golden Voyages (TSR, Inc.), p. 2. ISBN 978-1560763314.
  9. Sean K. Reynolds (2002-05-04). Deity Do's and Don'ts (Zipped PDF). Wizards of the Coast. pp. 10–15. Archived from the original on 2016-11-01. Retrieved on 2018-09-08.
  10. Anne Gray McCready et al. (March 1994). Elves of Evermeet. (TSR, Inc), p. 32. ISBN 1-5607-6829-0.
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