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Oinos, also called the Battle Plain,[3] was the first layer, also called first gloom, of Hades.[2]

DescriptionEdit

Oinos's landscape consisted mostly of plains with the occasional hill. It was the primary battleground of the Blood War, so it was where the fighting was the fiercest and most constant. Oinos's stunted trees and other plantlife was routinely destroyed by the fiendish armies trampling over it[4] and the sounds of battle could be heard anywhere on Oinos.[5]

Walking around on Oinos was dangerous for a person because of the risk of contracting a lethal disease called wasting sickness. It was believed that this sickness had to do with the many rotting corpses, which the aforementioned war produced.[3]

The Styx ran only on this layer of Hades. The water generally ran slow. However, dangerous passages existed. Because it was the easiest place to embark or to land on the Styx, traffic was quite heavy. It was also the layer fiends who participated in the Blood War used to land. Ferry services by marraenoloths were commonly offered.[6]

Another way to move between planes was to use portals, which were comparatively frequent on Oinos.[5]

Notable InhabitantsEdit

Abbathor
The dwarven god of greed lived in Glitterhell, one of the few places on Hades with color.[3]
Cyric
The Mad God lived once on Oinos in Bone Castle.[7] He was still seen on Oinos after he moved to Pandemonium.[8]
Kelemvor
The god of the dead of Toril tried to be a good god but here it was always deemed a matter of time for him to fail.[7] He transformed Cyric's realm in the Crystal Spire to serve as his abode.[8]
Kuraulyek
The god of the urds hid in his realm of Urdsrest among the hills of Oinos from Kurtulmak.[8][9]
The Oinoloth
The Oinoloth was the lord of Khin-Oin.[10] The layer was named after him.[11]
Yurtrus
The orcish god of death maintained his realm of Fleshslough on Oinos.[12]

AppendixEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Jeff Grubb (April 1987). “Plane Speaking: Tuning in to the Outer Planes”. In Roger E. Moore ed. Dragon #120 (TSR, Inc.), pp. 42–43.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Jeff Grubb, Bruce R. Cordell, David Noonan (September 2001). Manual of the Planes 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 108–109. ISBN 0-7869-1850-8.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Colin McComb (December 1995). “Liber Malevolentiae”. In Michele Carter ed. Planes of Conflict (TSR, Inc.), p. 51. ISBN 0-7869-0309-0.
  4. Colin McComb (December 1995). “Liber Malevolentiae”. In Michele Carter ed. Planes of Conflict (TSR, Inc.), pp. 46, 51. ISBN 0-7869-0309-0.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Jeff Grubb, Bruce R. Cordell, David Noonan (September 2001). Manual of the Planes 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 109. ISBN 0-7869-1850-8.
  6. Colin McComb (December 1995). “Liber Malevolentiae”. In Michele Carter ed. Planes of Conflict (TSR, Inc.), p. 45. ISBN 0-7869-0309-0.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), pp. 84–85. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 Colin McComb (December 1995). “Liber Malevolentiae”. In Michele Carter ed. Planes of Conflict (TSR, Inc.), p. 47. ISBN 0-7869-0309-0.
  9. Colin McComb (1996). On Hallowed Ground. Edited by Ray Vallese. (TSR, Inc), p. 176. ISBN 0-7869-0430-5.
  10. Colin McComb (December 1995). “Liber Malevolentiae”. In Michele Carter ed. Planes of Conflict (TSR, Inc.), p. 53. ISBN 0-7869-0309-0.
  11. Jeff Grubb (July 1987). Manual of the Planes 1st edition. (TSR), p. 105. ISBN 0880383992.
  12. Colin McComb (1996). On Hallowed Ground. Edited by Ray Vallese. (TSR, Inc), p. 134. ISBN 0-7869-0430-5.

ConnectionsEdit

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