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Phalorm (known as the Realm of Three Crowns and later as the Fallen Kingdom) was a kingdom in Northwest Faerûn made up of dwarves, elves, gnomes, halflings and humans.[1]

HistoryEdit

The kingdom was formed in 523 DR at the Council of Axe and Arrow, a council to deal with the growing orc problem in the area. Dwarves from Dardath, elves from the Ardeep Forest, gnomes from Dolblunde, halflings from Mieritin and humans from Delimbiyran collectively agreed to form a kingdom in the High Moor.[1][2]

Ulbaerag Bloodhand of Bloodhand Hold (later Waterdeep) rejected the opportunity to join the kingdom, but this decision was reversed later by his son.[1]

In 611 DR a mind flayer-led orc army known as the Everhorde destroyed the kingdom of Yarlith and laid siege to the city of Neverwinter. The combined armies of Phalorm, Uthtower and others rushed north to Neverwinter's aide and broke the siege. The combined armies continued to battle the Everhorde and finally destroyed it in 612 DR at the Battle of Firetears near what would later become Triboar.[3]

In 614 DR another orc horde arose in the High Moor, the Greypeak Mountains, and the Fields of the Dead to lay siege to the Realm of Three Crowns. The weakened armies responded and confronted the horde at Iniarv's Tower in the kingdom of Uthtower in 615 DR. The lich, Iniarv, who lived in the tower, responded by attacking both armies with devastating spells eventually causing the seas to rise and flood the area dispersing or killing everyone and creating the Mere of Dead Men. It is there that many of Phalarm's finest warriors still haunt the swamps.[3]

The kingdom was destroyed by the Horde of the Wastes in 615 DR and was thereafter referred to as the Fallen Kingdom.[1]

AppendixEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Eric L. Boyd (June 2005). City of Splendors: Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 8. ISBN 0-7869-3693-2.
  2. Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 48. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Eric L. Boyd (March/April 1999). “Eye of Myrkul”. In Christopher Perkins ed. Dungeon #73 (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 23–24.
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