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Phandalin was a mainly human village in the Sword Coast North. It was raided by orcs in 951 DR and subsequently abandoned.[3][4] It was eventually resettled in the late 15th century DR as a frontier settlement of farmers and prospectors.[5]

Description[]

In the late 15th century DR, Phandalin was a modest and architecturally boring town of farmers, woodcutters, trappers, and miners built atop the ruins of the old Phandalin.[5][2][6] The town quickly grew to about fifty well-maintained structures built of logs and flagstones[5][7] with three deep wells providing water.[3] The town was dominated by an apple orchard on the west side and a ruined manor atop a hill to the east. The townsfolk would congregate in a small town square and an adjacent town green.[7]

Geography[]

Phandalin was located in the northern foothills of the Sword Mountains south of Neverwinter Wood.[8] It was northeast of Leilon where the road that ran from the High Road to Triboar faded into a trail.[3] This was a region rich with both natural resources and adventuring opportunities.[6][8]

The climate was temperate with an average yearly rainfall of 18 inches (46 centimeters).[9]

Government[]

When Phandalin was first reestablished, it had no real functioning government, and the Phandalin Miner's Exchange began acting as a center of records-keeping for local mining claims. The townsfolk also annually elected a "townsmaster" who served as a judge and mediator as well as kept town records. In 1491 DR,[note 1] Harbin Wester was the the perennial townmaster.[10]

After diminished faith in the abilities of a single townmaster to address threats to the village during the early-to-mid 1490s DR, the townsfolk instead elected a three-member town council, consisting of Harbin Wester, Sildar Hallwinter, and Halia Thornton. By 1496 DR,[note 2] the town moved to expand the council to five as well as to elect a mayor.[7]

Trade[]

Phandalin was adjacent to land which was good for farming and ranching, and was near enough to Neverwinter Wood to support a woodcutting and logging industry. Most of the wealth, however, was from mining in the nearby Sword Mountains for gold, platinum,[2] and cold iron.[1]

History[]

Phandalin was originally a farming community[3] and a member of Phandelver's Pact, giving them access to the Forge of Spells and the mining operations in Wave Echo Cave.[11] However, when the orcs of the realm of Uruth Ukrypt had destroyed all game in their realm, they went in search of food and turned on the human settlements in the area, raiding them. Phandalin was one of these settlements, and in the Year of the Empty Hourglass, 951 DR, it was overrun and then abandoned.[3][4]

The town remained abandoned for centuries. After Volothamp Geddarm passed through the town and wrote about it in the mid 14th century DR, the area experienced an influx of tourists and adventurers.[12]

Beginning around 1486 DR, settlers from Neverwinter and Waterdeep began resettling the ruins of Phandalin, and the rebuilt town was well-established by the Year of the Scarlet Witch, 1491 DR.[5]

Around this time, two challenges befell the town. One was a group of bandits known as the Redbrands, or the Redbrand Ruffians, who settled in Phandalin, making their lair under Tresendar Manor. They committed several terrible acts, such as racketing local businesses, kidnapping over a dozen travelers to sell into slavery, killing the woodcarver Thel Dendrar for his defiance, and later kidnapping his family.[13] The other challenge was the appearance of Cryovain, a white dragon who claimed Icespire Hold as his lair and the region around Phandalin as his territory. The dragon terrorized the town and its neighbors, and further displaced orcs and monsters from of the Sword Mountains who likewise threatened Phandalin's safety.[2] Unimpressed with how the townmaster, Harbin Wester, handled these challenges, the townsfolk restructured their government to include a town council.[7]

During the early 1490s DR, much of the mineral wealth that was expected to flow into the town failed to materialize. The town could go for months with no new income from the mining operations,[14] and efforts to open the ancient mine at Wave Echo Cave were abandoned.[14]

In the Year of the Duplicitous Courtier, 1496 DR, an unusually intelligent ogre named Stuuzant began attacking local livestock in the middle of the town's first mayoral election.[15]

Notable Locations[]

Two people observing the town.

  • Stonehill Inn: A modest inn that was run by a short, friendly young human man named Toblen Stonehill. Toblen came from the east of Triboar, seeking opportunity in prospecting like many others. He soon found that he knew more about running an inn than mining, and so he established the inn.[16]
  • Barthen's Provisions: The biggest trading post in Phandalin, staying open from sunup to sundown. It was run by a lean and balding, middle-aged man with a kindly manner, Elmar Barthen.[13] This shop was converted to the Temple of the Coinmaiden, dedicated to Waukeen, in 1496 DR.[17]
  • Edermath Orchard: An orchard field with the simple cottage of a silver-haired half-elf named Daran Edermath. Daran was a retired marshal in the lands of the Dragon Coast. When he retired, he returned to the Neverwinter region, which was his original home.[13]
  • Lionshield Coster: A weapons and armor supplier owned by the Lionshield Coster. The master of this post was a sharp-tongued woman named Linene Graywind.[18]
  • Phandalin Miner's Exchange: A trading post where miners had their finds weighed and paid out. The townsmaster's records were kept here, with responsibility of no local lord. The exchange was run by a Zhentarim agent who attempted to slowly take control of Phandalin.[19]
  • Alderleaf Farm: A simple farm that was run by a wise female halfling named Qelline Alderleaf. She was long-time friends with the druid, Reidoth.[10]
  • Shrine of Luck: A small shrine made of stone from the ruins and Phandalin's only temple, dedicated to Tymora. It was in the care of a zealous young elf and member of the Harpers, Sister Garaele.[10]
  • The Sleeping Giant: A rundown, dirty, and dangerous watering hole. It was known for being frequented by a bandit group, the Redbrands. It was operated by a surly female dwarf named Grista.[10]
  • Townmaster's Hall: A small building that served as the town's council building. It also housed a small, but serviceable jail in the cellar. It was run by the townsmaster, Harbin Wester.[20]
  • The Smithy: A local blacksmith.[17]
  • Tresendar Manor: More of a castle than a manor, it was an ancient building that was abandoned after the orc raids of 951 DR. The cellars were turned into the hideout of the Redbrands. The cellars once served as a safe haven when the estate was attacked. It also served as a resting place for the deceased members of the Tresendar family.[21] It was later turned into a guildhall for an adventuring company.[22]

Appendix[]

Notes[]

  1. Pages 30‒31 of Lost Mine of Phandelver describe the eruption of Mount Hotenow (1451 DR) as occurring "30 years ago", which would place the adventure in 1481 DR. However, pages 103 and 179 of Acquisitions Incorporated, a later source, state that the events described in the adventure happen five years after both Lost Mine of Phandelver and Princes of the Apocalypse. Since the latter is explicitly set in 1491 DR, and considering this answer by Ed Greenwood about dating the adventure, this wiki will use 1491 DR for events related to this sourcebook.
  2. Canon material does not provide a year for the events described in Acquisitions Incorporated, but Jerry Holkins answered a question via Twitter and stated the year was 1496 DR. Unless a canon source contradicts this assertion, this wiki will use 1496 DR for events related to this sourcebook.

Appearances[]

Adventures
Lost Mine of PhandelverThe Orrery of the WandererDragon of Icespire PeakStorm Lord's Wrath
Referenced only
Princes of the ApocalypseStorm King's ThunderSleeping Dragon's WakeDivine Contention

Gallery[]

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Obsidian Entertainment (November 2008). Designed by Tony Evans. Neverwinter Nights 2: Storm of Zehir. Atari.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 |Christopher Perkins (September 2019). “Dragon of Icespire Peak”. In Scott Fitzgerald Gray ed. Dungeons & Dragons Essentials Kit (Wizards of the Coast), p. 7. ISBN 978-0-7869-6683-7.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 196. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Brian R. James, Ed Greenwood (September 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. Edited by Kim Mohan, Penny Williams. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 112. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Wizards RPG Team (July 2014). “Lost Mine of Phandelver”. Dungeons & Dragons Starter Set (Wizards of the Coast), p. 14. ISBN 978-0-7869-6559-5.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 104. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 Jerry Holkins, Elyssa Grant, Scott Fitzgerald Gray (June 18, 2019). Acquisitions Incorporated. Edited by Scott Fitzgerald Gray. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 101–102. ISBN 978-0786966905.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Wizards RPG Team (July 2014). “Lost Mine of Phandelver”. Dungeons & Dragons Starter Set (Wizards of the Coast), p. 5. ISBN 978-0-7869-6559-5.
  9. Jerry Holkins, Elyssa Grant, Scott Fitzgerald Gray (June 18, 2019). Acquisitions Incorporated. Edited by Scott Fitzgerald Gray. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 104. ISBN 978-0786966905.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 Wizards RPG Team (July 2014). “Lost Mine of Phandelver”. Dungeons & Dragons Starter Set (Wizards of the Coast), p. 18. ISBN 978-0-7869-6559-5.
  11. Wizards RPG Team (July 2014). “Lost Mine of Phandelver”. Dungeons & Dragons Starter Set (Wizards of the Coast), p. 3. ISBN 978-0-7869-6559-5.
  12. Monica Valentinelli, Shawn Merwin, Rich Lescouflair (2016-11-04). In Volo's Wake (PDF). D&D Adventurers League: Season 0 (Wizards of the Coast), p. ?.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 Wizards RPG Team (July 2014). “Lost Mine of Phandelver”. Dungeons & Dragons Starter Set (Wizards of the Coast), p. 16. ISBN 978-0-7869-6559-5.
  14. 14.0 14.1 Jerry Holkins, Elyssa Grant, Scott Fitzgerald Gray (June 18, 2019). Acquisitions Incorporated. Edited by Scott Fitzgerald Gray. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 106. ISBN 978-0786966905.
  15. Jerry Holkins, Elyssa Grant, Scott Fitzgerald Gray (June 18, 2019). Acquisitions Incorporated. Edited by Scott Fitzgerald Gray. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 107. ISBN 978-0786966905.
  16. Wizards RPG Team (July 2014). “Lost Mine of Phandelver”. Dungeons & Dragons Starter Set (Wizards of the Coast), p. 15. ISBN 978-0-7869-6559-5.
  17. 17.0 17.1 Jerry Holkins, Elyssa Grant, Scott Fitzgerald Gray (June 18, 2019). Acquisitions Incorporated. Edited by Scott Fitzgerald Gray. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 108–109. ISBN 978-0786966905.
  18. Wizards RPG Team (July 2014). “Lost Mine of Phandelver”. Dungeons & Dragons Starter Set (Wizards of the Coast), p. 16. ISBN 978-0-7869-6559-5.
  19. Wizards RPG Team (July 2014). “Lost Mine of Phandelver”. Dungeons & Dragons Starter Set (Wizards of the Coast), p. 17. ISBN 978-0-7869-6559-5.
  20. Wizards RPG Team (July 2014). “Lost Mine of Phandelver”. Dungeons & Dragons Starter Set (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 18–19. ISBN 978-0-7869-6559-5.
  21. Wizards RPG Team (July 2014). “Lost Mine of Phandelver”. Dungeons & Dragons Starter Set (Wizards of the Coast), p. 20. ISBN 978-0-7869-6559-5.
  22. Jerry Holkins, Elyssa Grant, Scott Fitzgerald Gray (June 18, 2019). Acquisitions Incorporated. Edited by Scott Fitzgerald Gray. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 97. ISBN 978-0786966905.
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