House Phylund (pronounced: /ˈflʌndFEYE-lund[2]) was a noble family of Waterdeep in the 14th century DR[1][2][3] and still had a significant presence circa 1492 DR.[4][note 1] The primary family business was acquiring, taming, training, and selling fierce beasts.[1][2][3]

What you fear, we master.
— Phylund motto[4]

Organization[edit | edit source]

In the Year of Wild Magic, 1372 DR, the head of the family was Urtos Phylund II and his consort Lythis.[2][3] They had a son, Tarnos,[5] and two others,[6] but the official heir recognized by the Lords of Waterdeep was Urtos III, son of Urtos I and his consort (and widow), Aridarye.[2][3][5] At this time, there were fourteen Phylund nobles in all.[3]

Activities[edit | edit source]

Specializing in the many uses of monsters, they captured, bred, and sold monsters as pets, guard beasts, and arena fighters. Those that couldn't be tamed or used in the arena were either released to be hunted for sport or harvested for their flesh, skin, and bones. The Phylunds sponsored both monster hunting expeditions and adventuring parties to procure new beasts.[4] In the mid-14th century, they had a thriving monster safari business that attracted adventurous nobles to pay for the experience of hunting exotic monsters in Ardeep Forest.[7] With his marriage to Lady Lythis Mhairuun, Urtos II acquired the secrets and techniques for breeding and training watchspiders for the Phylund clan, which significantly increased the family's already considerable fortunes.[5][6][8]

Base of Operations[edit | edit source]

The Phylund family villa (labeled N40) circa 1372 DR.

The Phylund family estate was located in the North Ward on the east side of Copper Street between Julthoon Street and Manycats Alley. The compound included two- and three-story buildings.[4][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16] In the Year of the Bloodbird, 1346 DR, Urtos I built a grand house in Ardeep Forest that he called a "hunting lodge", but it had all the comforts of a noble villa. It was used as a private lodge as well as a base for monster hunting expeditions hosted by the Phylunds.[7]

Relationships[edit | edit source]

The Phylunds were rivals with other Waterdhavian families that had similar interests in exotic beasts, notably the Brokengulfs, the Gundwynds, and the Ilvastarrs,[17] but there were exceptions. Most prominent was the friendship between Urtos II and Prendergast Brokengulf.[18] The lines were further blurred when Prendergast married Urtos II's young stepmother, Aridarye.[3]

History[edit | edit source]

The Phylund family was of Tethyrian descent and the family was ennobled in the Year of the Ormserpent, 1295 DR.[3] Their status and fortunes rose steadily for decades. The beast-breeding business was lucrative and the monster safaris hosted at the Lodge in Ardeep Forest were quite popular—so much so, that they considered branching out to the Forlorn Hills or the Sword Mountains.[7] The Lodge became the Phylund headquarters for a time[19] until tragedy befell the family in the Year of the Sword, 1365 DR, when Urtos II and nine other members of a hunting expedition were reportedly killed by a large pack of wolves. Days later, Urtos I and six beast-wranglers were killed by an owlbear in the basement of the Field of Triumph, supposedly because the elder Urtos grew careless in his grief and a cage had not been secured properly.[20] In reality, both accidents were deliberately caused at the behest of Aridarye.[5][21] She planned to take over the family business by having her son, Urtos III, be named heir and herself as regent.[6]

Urtos II did not die in the wolf attack, but he was afflicted with lycanthropy.[5] It took him several tendays to learn that he could remain master of himself during the time of the full moon, but could not control the transformation into a werewolf. Upon hearing news of his father's death, he returned to Waterdeep less than a tenday after the funeral and claimed his birthright as head of the Phyland clan, much to the shock and vexation of Aridarye.[20] Thereafter, Urtos II spent the nights of the full moon at the Lodge and hid his affliction from everyone with the help of Kharkos, a trusted family butler.[5]

The Phylund family villa (outlined in red), circa 1492 DR.

In the Year of the Staff, 1366 DR,[6] after more than a decade of vying for his attention, Lady Lythis Mhairuun finally won the affections of Urtos II and they wed. Lythis was shocked to discover his secret after she had followed him to the Lodge during a full moon, but she swore to keep his trust and the wedding proceeded as planned. By the Year of the Banner, 1368 DR, she had borne him a son, Tarnos,[5] and two more came later,[6] but all three were declared unfit to inherit the title by the Lords of Waterdeep, presumably because they were feared to be tainted with their father's affliction. Aridarye finally got her wish when the Lords decreed that her son, Urtos III, was the officially recognized heir.[5][6][22]

In the Year of the Gauntlet, 1369 DR, amid the chaos during the event known has Halaster's Higharvestide, three behirs appeared in the North Ward not far from the Phylund estate. Lord Urtos II and his beast-tamers captured them in good health with minimal property damage and no loss of life.[23]

Eventually, Urtos II's secret was revealed and the family's fortunes waned. All members who were living at the Lodge moved back to the villa on Copper Street as they tried to put uncomfortable events behind them. By the 1480s DR, the Lodge had fallen into disrepair and a Red Wizard necromancer named Thegger Grynn had moved in and began experimenting on the contents of the Phylund family crypts.[19]

By the mid–1490s DR, the Phylunds were still in business and still sponsoring groups of adventurers to hunt and capture beasts for their monster mill.[4]

Notable Members[edit | edit source]

Appendix[edit | edit source]

Notes[edit | edit source]

  1. Canon material does not provide a year for the events described in Waterdeep: Dragon Heist, but Christopher Perkins answered a question via Twitter and stated the year was 1492 DR. Corroborating this, Dragon Heist page 20 refers to events of Death Masks (set in 1491 DR) as being "last year". Unless a canon source contradicts this assertion, this wiki will use 1492 DR for events related to this sourcebook and Waterdeep: Dungeon of the Mad Mage (which is referenced on pages 5 and 98 of Dragon Heist).

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Ed Greenwood (1987). Waterdeep and the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 48. ISBN 0-88038-490-5.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). “Who's Who in Waterdeep”. City of Splendors (TSR, Inc), p. 21. ISBN 0-5607-6868-1.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.9 Eric L. Boyd (2005-09-28). Noble Houses of Waterdeep (Zipped PDF). Wizards of the Coast. p. 6. Archived from the original on 2016-11-01. Retrieved on 2009-10-07.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 Christopher Perkins, James Haeck, James Introcaso, Adam Lee, Matthew Sernett (September 2018). Waterdeep: Dragon Heist. Edited by Jeremy Crawford. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 13. ISBN 978-0-7869-6625-7.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). “Who's Who in Waterdeep”. City of Splendors (TSR, Inc), p. 22. ISBN 0-5607-6868-1.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 Tito Leati, Eric L. Boyd, Keith Baker, Richard Pett, F. Wesley Schneider and James Lafond Sutter (November 2005). Dungeon #128 Map & Handout Supplement (PDF). Paizo Publishing. p. 8. Archived from the original on 2017-05-06. Retrieved on 2020-08-13.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Eric L. Boyd (2006-05-03). Environs of Waterdeep (Zipped PDF). Wizards of the Coast. p. 4. Archived from the original on 2016-08-16. Retrieved on 2009-10-07.
  8. Monstrous Compendium included in Ed Greenwood, Steven E. Schend (July 1994). City of Splendors. (TSR, Inc.). ISBN 0-5607-6868-1.
  9. Ed Greenwood (1987). Waterdeep and the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 24. ISBN 0-88038-490-5.
  10. Ed Greenwood and Jeff Grubb (September 1988). City System. Edited by Karen Boomgarden. (TSR, Inc.), p. 12. ISBN 0-8803-8600-2.
  11. Map 9/10 included in Ed Greenwood and Jeff Grubb, cartographers Dennis Kauth and Frey Graphics (September 1988). City System. Edited by Karen Boomgarden. (TSR, Inc.). ISBN 0-8803-8600-2.
  12. Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). “Campaign Guide”. City of Splendors (TSR, Inc), p. 44. ISBN 0-5607-6868-1.
  13. Map included in Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). City of Splendors. (TSR, Inc). ISBN 978-1560768685.
  14. Ed Greenwood (January 1993). Volo's Guide to Waterdeep. (TSR, Inc.), p. 239. ISBN 1-56076-335-3.
  15. Map included in Ed Greenwood (January 1993). Volo's Guide to Waterdeep. (TSR, Inc.). ISBN 1-56076-335-3.
  16. Eric L. Boyd (June 2005). City of Splendors: Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 94, 101. ISBN 0-7869-3693-2.
  17. Steven E. Schend (March 1994). “Adversaries”. In Jean Rabe ed. Polyhedron #93 (TSR, Inc.), p. 4.
  18. Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). “Who's Who in Waterdeep”. City of Splendors (TSR, Inc), p. 11. ISBN 0-5607-6868-1.
  19. 19.0 19.1 Tito Leati, Matthew Sernett and Chris Sims (February 2014). Scourge of the Sword Coast. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 31.
  20. 20.0 20.1 Steven E. Schend (March 1994). “Adversaries”. In Jean Rabe ed. Polyhedron #93 (TSR, Inc.), p. 6.
  21. Tito Leati, Eric L. Boyd, Keith Baker, Richard Pett, F. Wesley Schneider and James Lafond Sutter (November 2005). Dungeon #128 Map & Handout Supplement (PDF). Paizo Publishing. p. 9. Archived from the original on 2017-05-06. Retrieved on 2020-08-13.
  22. Eric L. Boyd (2005-09-28). Noble Houses of Waterdeep (Zipped PDF). Wizards of the Coast. p. 8. Archived from the original on 2016-11-01. Retrieved on 2009-10-07.
  23. Steven E. Schend (January 1997). Undermountain: Stardock. Edited by Bill Olmesdahl. (TSR, Inc.), p. 6. ISBN 0-7869-0451-8.
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 24.3 24.4 Tito Leati, Matthew Sernett and Chris Sims (February 2014). Scourge of the Sword Coast. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 36.

Connections[edit | edit source]

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