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Pines were a type of hardwood[3], coniferous tree, part of a family of trees known as evergreens.[5]

VarietiesEdit

BlueridgeEdit

The blueridge pine was a species that could be found in the sandy soil of the Rimwood on the outskirts of the Cormanthor forest.[6]

Blue SnowwoodEdit

The blue snowwood pine was a species endemic to the Great Glacier.[7]

Lost NeedleEdit

The lost needle pine was a species endemic to the Pirate Isles.[7]

NeedleleafEdit

The needleleaf pine was a species that could be found in the sandy soil of the Rimwood on the outskirts of the Cormanthor forest.[6]

PinyonEdit

The pinyon pine was a species that grew in the Pasocada Basin area of Maztica, where it was eaten by the Azuposi.[8]

PonderosaEdit

One of the largest pine species, the ponderosa was prominent in part of the Savage Frontier.[9]

RoseneedleEdit

Roseneedle pines grew along the banks of the River Ashaba and rarely grew more than 3 ft (0.91 m) tall. The roots of the tree could extend to over 10' (3m) in depth, with their ends forming tubers that were shaped roughly like potatoes and made for excellent fishing bait. Each needle on the tree had a pink or white rose-like blossom.[6]

WhiteEdit

The stately white pine was present in the Savage Frontier.[10]

HabitatsEdit

UsageEdit

  • Some druids in the Moonshae Isles were known to have groves that were made up of a cluster of pine trees, especially those situated at higher elevations or in the barren northern fringes of the Isles.[14]

AppendixEdit

External LinksEdit

Pine article at Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 R.A. Salvatore (July 2003). The Thousand Orcs. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 44. ISBN 978-0786929801.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 160. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Andrew Cermak, John W. Mangrum, Ryan Naylor, Chris Nichols, Andrew Wyatt (September 16, 2002). Ravenloft Gazetteer Volume I. (White Wolf Publishing), p. 14. ISBN 1-58846-080-0.
  4. Jeff Grubb, Julia Martin, Steven E. Schend et al (1992). Aurora's Whole Realms Catalogue. (TSR, Inc), pp. 38, 50. ISBN 0-5607-6327-2.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Douglas Niles (1987). Moonshae. (TSR, Inc), p. 17. ISBN 0-88038-494-8.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 James Butler, Elizabeth T. Danforth, Jean Rabe (September 1994). “Cormanthor”. In Karen S. Boomgarden ed. Elminster's Ecologies (TSR, Inc), p. 10. ISBN 1-5607-6917-3.
  7. 7.0 7.1 James Butler, Elizabeth T. Danforth, Jean Rabe (September 1994). “Explorer's Manual”. In Karen S. Boomgarden ed. Elminster's Ecologies (TSR, Inc), p. 5. ISBN 1-5607-6917-3.
  8. John Nephew and Jonathan Tweet (April 1992). City of Gold. (TSR, Inc), p. 16. ISBN 978-1560763222.
  9. Jennell Jaquays (1988). The Savage Frontier. (TSR, Inc), p. 15. ISBN 0-88038-593-6.
  10. Jennell Jaquays (1988). The Savage Frontier. (TSR, Inc). ISBN 0-88038-593-6.
  11. Ed Greenwood and Jason Carl (July 2002). Silver Marches. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 8, 21. ISBN 0-7869-2835-2.
  12. Richard Baker, Matt Forbeck, Sean K. Reynolds (May 2003). Unapproachable East. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 113, 130, 152. ISBN 0-7869-2881-6.
  13. Richard Baker, Matt Forbeck, Sean K. Reynolds (May 2003). Unapproachable East. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 128, 153. ISBN 0-7869-2881-6.
  14. Douglas Niles (1987). Moonshae. (TSR, Inc), p. 7. ISBN 0-88038-494-8.
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