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Rabbits were common animals throughout the Realms.

It was not uncommon to find them cooked and served in taverns and the like, such as at the Elfstone Tavern in Waterdeep.[1]

They were considered exotic pets in the city of Sigil, where they were considered clean and quiet. They sold for two copper pieces.[2]

SpeciesEdit

MoorEdit

The moor rabbit was found in the region of High Moor. They were rather scrawny, but quite tough. Their fur was usually a light brown fur, with white tuffs at the tips of their ears. They competed with the region's native moor rats for food and living space.[3]

SpinyEdit

The spiny rabbit was found in the forest of Cormanthor. It has red fur and bright green eyes, but otherwise resembled a normal rabbit. It was usually calm and placid, but if startled, three spines on its stomach became erect. These spines gave the rabbit its name, and could prove deadly if they pierced the skin.[4]

WhistlingEdit

The sage Elminster heard tales of a kind of rabbit living in the Brynwood in the Vast that was capable of whistling like a canary. It could even be taught a surprising number of tunes.[5]

HabitatEdit

Rabbits were common in the Pellamcopse Woods outside of Waterdeep.[6]

AppendixEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Ed Greenwood (January 1993). Volo's Guide to Waterdeep. (TSR, Inc.), p. 25. ISBN 1-56076-335-3.
  2. Wolfgang Baur, Rick Swan (June 1995). In the Cage: A Guide to Sigil. Edited by Karen S. Boomgarden. (TSR, Inc.), p. 126. ISBN 978-0786901111.
  3. Tim Beach (October 1995). “The High Moor”. In Julia Martin ed. Elminster's Ecologies Appendix II (TSR, Inc), p. 18. ISBN 0786901713.
  4. James Butler, Elizabeth T. Danforth, Jean Rabe (September 1994). “Cormanthor”. In Karen S. Boomgarden ed. Elminster's Ecologies (TSR, Inc), p. 15. ISBN 1-5607-6917-3.
  5. James Butler, Elizabeth T. Danforth, Jean Rabe (September 1994). “Explorer's Manual”. In Karen S. Boomgarden ed. Elminster's Ecologies (TSR, Inc), p. 7. ISBN 1-5607-6917-3.
  6. Steven E. Schend (July 2006). Blackstaff. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 15. ISBN 978-0786940165.
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