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Razorvine, often called "the kudzu of the Outer Planes",[2] was a creeping and climbing weed native to the Lower planes that was endemic to Sigil and common in many locations across the multiverse. Its fast rate of growth and the razor-sharp stems and thorns that gave the plant its name granted it the reputation of an environmental hazard.[2][3][5][6][7]

Trying to talk with a gith is like trying to make good with razorvine.
— Morte[8]

Description[]

Its small, serrated, heart-shaped leaves were so dark that were often considered black,[3][4] usually growing on short sprigs near the plant's triangular stem. The leaves themselves were harmless, but the stems had elevated ridges that ran along the edges that were extremely hard and sharp.[3]

The plant itself was not intelligent or aggressive, and could not move. The danger of the razorvine was in trying to handle it, brushing past it, or falling into it. The deep cuts caused by the stems could easily kill an unprotected creature who fell into a patch just by struggling to get free. Remaining motionless could prevent some of the damage. Armor and magic items such as a ring of protection or a cloak of protection provided some defense from the razorvine, but spells and items that misdirected an attacker, such as blur, bracers of defense, or boots of striding and springing did not help at all.[2][3]

Each individual razorvine plant consisted of between two and twenty vines that grew in patches 12​ to ​20 feet (3.7​ to ​6.1 meters) long.[3] It grew in chaotic and tangled systems,[5] so it was impossible to tell exactly how many plants existed in a large patch.[3] The plant grew extremely fast, at a rate of at least 1 foot per day (30 centimeters per day).[2][6][9] Even after killing all vines, the plant grew back after just a few days, unless the central root system was destroyed.[3]

Dried razorvine patches occasionally formed balls that could be blown by the wind.[10]

Ecology[]

Don't move, or the vine will cut through your flesh to your bone. It's called razorvine. You must be new to Sigil, or you would have known not to get anywhere near it. The citizens here grow it to keep thieves out.
— Joel the Rebel Bard to a priest of Iyachtu Xvim[11]

Very few natural creatures were capable of eating razorvine, but the weed was known to be eaten by the voracious quills, porcupine-like creatures native to the Outer Planes.[12] It was also greatly enjoyed by fhorges, creatures similar to boar that roamed the Outlands, Acheron, and the Nine Hells.[13]

In Sigil, part of the duties of the dabus included pruning the razorvines around the city.[4] The previous day's growth was cut, dried, and then sold as firewood.[2]

Uses[]

  • Despite the dangers of handling it, razorvine was very easy to grow and relatively easy to train. With a few prunings, it could easily cover a wall or seal off an entrance. For that reason, it was very popular as an effective way to keep intruders out of private places.[3][6]
  • In its raw state, razorvine was inedible by humanoids. However, the Cilenei brothers, two elven wizards from Curst, knew a technique to safely ferment razorvine leaves. They grew them in vineyards in the city and used them to make a drink known as heartwine.[2][3][14] They also made the drink from freshly cut razorvine brought by visitors.[15] The recipe was a secret known only by the two brothers, but it was suspected that it involved some sort of magical procedure.[14]
  • The vines did not burn well and were very resistant to fire. However, once dried, the stems lost their edge and the plant became very brittle, providing good firewood and kindling.[3][6][9]
  • Dried and oiled vines could also be used to make rope that was as dangerous to handle as a living vine, and made for particularly cruel bindings, as well as whips.[3][16]
  • The sap from these plants, when hardened and properly prepared, could be used to make items that were conducive to enchantment with powerful spells of protection.[8]

History[]

The exact origin of razorvine was unknown, but it was speculated that the plant had been first brought to Sigil from some jungle in the Abyss.[3]

In the late 15th century DR, the Emerald Enclave sent adventurers to investigate reports of razorvine growing in the Marsh of Chelimber.[17] The vines had infested the Island of Brutes, a large island located within the marsh.[1][18]

Rumors & Legends[]

It was rumored that a visitor to Ribcage was killed and quartered for trying to smuggle razorvine cuttings into the city, shortly after it was cleared of a previous razorvine infestation.[3]

The razor-sharp grass that grew on the plains of Cathrys was thought by some to be a lesser version of razorvine.[19]

Trivia[]

Razorvine was a favored plant of the deity Deep Duerra.[20]

Appendix[]

See Also[]

Appearances[]

Adventures
In the AbyssWell of WorldsExpedition to the Demonweb Pits
Novels
Tymora's LuckBloodwalk
Video Games
Referenced only
Planescape: TormentIcewind Dale
Organized Play & Licensed Adventures
Beneath the Fetid ChelimberChelimber's Descent

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Ron Lundeen (2016). Beneath the Fetid Chelimber (DDAL5-06) (PDF). Edited by Claire Hoffman, Travis Woodall. D&D Adventurers League: Storm King's Thunder (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 9–11.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 David "Zeb" Cook (1994). Planescape Campaign Setting, Sigil and Beyond. Edited by David Wise. (TSR, Inc), pp. 59–60. ISBN 978-1560768340.
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 Richard Baker (October 1995). Monstrous Compendium Planescape Appendix II. Edited by Karen S. Boomgarden. (TSR, Inc.), pp. 78–79. ISBN 0-7869-0173-X.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 James Wyatt, Bill Slavicsek, Robin D. Laws (September 2009). Dungeon Master's Guide 2. Edited by Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 188. ISBN 978-0786952441.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford, Christopher Perkins, James Wyatt (2014). Dungeon Master's Guide 5th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 110. ISBN 978-0786965622.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 Bruce R. Cordell, Gwendolyn F.M. Kestrel (July 2004). Planar Handbook. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 146. ISBN 0-7869-3429-8.
  7. Richard Baker, John Rogers, Robert J. Schwalb, James Wyatt (December 2008). Manual of the Planes 4th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 22. ISBN 978-0-7869-5002-7.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Black Isle Studios (December 1999). Designed by Chris Avellone. Planescape: Torment. Interplay.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Wolfgang Baur, Gwendolyn F.M. Kestrel (April 2007). Expedition to the Demonweb Pits. Edited by Michele Carter, Penny Williams. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 107. ISBN 978-0-7869-4038-7.
  10. James Wyatt, Bill Slavicsek, Robin D. Laws (September 2009). Dungeon Master's Guide 2. Edited by Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 201. ISBN 978-0786952441.
  11. Jeff Grubb and Kate Novak (January 1998). Tymora's Luck. (Wizards of the Coast), chap. 2, p. 28. ISBN 0-7869-0726-6.
  12. Richard Baker (October 1995). Monstrous Compendium Planescape Appendix II. Edited by Karen S. Boomgarden. (TSR, Inc.), pp. 74–75. ISBN 0-7869-0173-X.
  13. Richard Baker (October 1995). Monstrous Compendium Planescape Appendix II. Edited by Karen S. Boomgarden. (TSR, Inc.), pp. 38–39. ISBN 0-7869-0173-X.
  14. 14.0 14.1 David "Zeb" Cook (1994). Planescape Campaign Setting, Sigil and Beyond. Edited by David Wise. (TSR, Inc), p. 36. ISBN 978-1560768340.
  15. Monte Cook (1996). The Planewalker's Handbook. Edited by Michele Carter. (TSR), p. 12. ISBN 978-0786904600.
  16. Wolfgang Baur, Rick Swan (June 1995). In the Cage: A Guide to Sigil. Edited by Karen S. Boomgarden. (TSR, Inc.), p. 7. ISBN 978-0786901111.
  17. Ron Lundeen (2016). Beneath the Fetid Chelimber (DDAL5-06) (PDF). Edited by Claire Hoffman, Travis Woodall. D&D Adventurers League: Storm King's Thunder (Wizards of the Coast), p. 5.
  18. Claire Hoffman (2016). Chelimber's Descent (DDAL5-07) (PDF). Edited by Claire Hoffman, Travis Woodall. D&D Adventurers League: Storm King's Thunder (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 6–7.
  19. Colin McComb (December 1995). “Liber Malevolentiae”. In Michele Carter ed. Planes of Conflict (TSR, Inc.), p. 19. ISBN 0-7869-0309-0.
  20. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 55. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
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