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Scarves, also known as mufflers, were lengths of fabric that people wore for a variety of reasons.[1]

DescriptionEdit

Scarves were made in a variety of materials and colors. People wore scarves for fashion purposes, just to keep warm,[1] to protect their eyes[2] and skin from the sun's rays,[3] or to protect their mouths from airborne particles like dust.[4]

Aurora's Whole Realms Catalogue was known to offer silk scarves decorated with print designs, as well as mufflers made of either linen or wool.[1] In the city of Waterdeep, one could find silk scarves that were green, red, white, and flame-orange.[5]

HistoryEdit

In −223 DR, a wu jen adviser to the emperor of Wa named Hui-Po fashioned four enchanted silk scarves that would transport their wearer to the plane of Qui.[6]

Around 1357 DR, the general fashion for women in the Koryoan city of Tu Pe was high-shouldered linen gowns adorned with silk scarves.[7]

In 1364 DR, the Pasha Balik of Zazesspur was found assassinated in his bed with a scarf left behind by his assassin covering his eyes.[8]

In 1475 DR, Chant Morven was given a magical scarf to hold by a deva named Demascus. Kalkan Swordbreaker, a fallen deva, later sent the rogue Riltana to retrieve this scarf in 1479 DR. While she succeeded in this task, Chant and Demascus managed to track her down and retrieve it.[9]

Varieties of ScarvesEdit

  • Keffiyehs: a type of headscarf typically worn in desert regions such as Anauroch.[10]
  • Liripipes: a type of scarf that was originally intended for the head, but came to be commonly worn around the throat. They were worn in such a way that both the chin and shoulders were covered. They were commonly found in Waterdeep.[5]

Notable ScarvesEdit

Notable Wearers of ScarvesEdit

GroupsEdit

  • Throughout the Realms, many merchants were known to hang loose knotted scarves around their upper chest in an arc. This was primarily done to conceal whatever goods they were carrying, though the scarves also doubled as a mouth cover against dusty or stinky environments.[4]
  • Throughout the Realms, some youths of either gender were known to distinguish themselves by supplementing their hand-me-down clothing with a scarf worn around the shoulders, wrists, or even belt.[12]
  • Members of the Society of the Purple Lotus often wore violet scarves.[13]
  • Scarves were one of many portable items that a wizards' guild, such as the Watchful Order of Magists and Protectors in Waterdeep, might gift to someone during their initiation. These scarves could be used as a form of spell focus.[14]
  • In Zakhara, wizards known as mageweavers often used scarves to hold spells instead of spellbooks.[15]

IndividualsEdit

NationsEdit

  • In the nation of Cormyr, it was considered a custom for young women to indicate their availability and search for a husband by wearing a purple scarf in public.[17][18] Lovers in this nation also tended to gift purple scarves as a sign of affection.[18]
  • Scarves were a common item of clothing among peasants in the Plain of Horses.[19]
  • In the kingdom of Ravens Bluff, different colored scarves were some of the honors awarded upon knights for committing certain acts. Blue scarves were awarded for destroying an evil artifact. Black scarves were awarded for destroying some form of magic-wielding undead, such as a lich or vampire. Green scarves were awarded for removing a great curse, like a plague. And finally, white scarves were awarded to knights who freed innocents of a curse and then vanquished the one responsible.[20]
  • Multi-colored scarves were a common article of clothing among women in the land of Tabot. The wearing of scarves was especially common in the city of Frekang Gompa.[21]

RacesEdit

  • Many halflings covered their heads with brightly colored scarves in order to keep the sun's rays out of their eyes.[2]
  • Ruin chanters often wore scarves in order to obscure their appearance.[22]
  • Wang-Liang females were often known to wear scarves around their necks.[23]

ReligionsEdit

  • The adventuring priests and clergy of Akadi were known to wear silk scarves.[24]
  • During ceremonies and religious services, worshipers of Azuth often wore scarves decorated with various arcane symbols.[25]
  • The Zakharan holy slayer organization known as the Moon-spinners had a long white scarf as their holy symbol. Their members often used these to whip or strangle their opponents.[26]
  • The clergy of Sharindlar often wore blue scarves as part of their clerical raiment. These were worn tied around either the ankle, brow, upper arm, or wrist.[27]
  • Priestesses of Sune often tied their long hair back with crimson scarves.[28]
  • Clerics of the Church of Tiamat typically wore robes and scarves of certain colors to denote their clerical rank.[29]
  • The clergy of Umberlee were known to wear scarves of mottled blue and green.[30]

TriviaEdit

  • Along the Sword Coast, a variety of scarves were typically sold by merchants during the annual Simril festival.[11]

AppendixEdit

AppearancesEdit

Adventures
Test of the SamuraiThe Ruins of UndermountainExpedition to the Demonweb Pits
Video Games
Neverwinter

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Jeff Grubb, Julia Martin, Steven E. Schend et al (1992). Aurora's Whole Realms Catalogue. (TSR, Inc), p. 85. ISBN 0-5607-6327-2.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Skip Williams (February 2005). Races of the Wild. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 40. ISBN 0-7869-3438-7.
  3. Rick Swan (1993). The Complete Ranger's Handbook. Edited by Elizabeth Danforth. (TSR, Inc), p. 96. ISBN 1560766344.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Ed Greenwood (October 2012). Ed Greenwood Presents Elminster's Forgotten Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 97. ISBN 0786960345.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Ed Greenwood and Jeff Grubb (September 1988). City System. Edited by Karen Boomgarden. (TSR, Inc.), p. 29. ISBN 0-8803-8600-2.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 53. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  7. Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume II). (TSR, Inc), p. 118. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  8. Steven E. Schend (1997). Lands of Intrigue: Book One: Tethyr. (TSR, Inc.), p. 72. ISBN 0-7869-0697-9.
  9. Bruce R. Cordell (April 2011). Sword of the Gods. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 978-0786957392.
  10. Ed Greenwood (November 1991). Anauroch. Edited by Karen S. Boomgarden. (TSR, Inc.), p. 19. ISBN 1-56076-126-1.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Cryptic Studios (June 2013). Neverwinter. Perfect World Entertainment.
  12. Ed Greenwood (October 2012). Ed Greenwood Presents Elminster's Forgotten Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 96. ISBN 0786960345.
  13. Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume I). (TSR, Inc), p. 22. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  14. Sean K. Reynolds, Duane Maxwell, Angel McCoy (August 2001). Magic of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 19. ISBN 0-7869-1964-7.
  15. Sam Witt (January 1994). The Complete Sha'ir's Handbook. (TSR, Inc), pp. 64–66. ISBN 978-1560768289.
  16. Ed Greenwood and Jeff Grubb (April 1998). Cormyr: A Novel (Paperback). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 16. ISBN ISBN 0-7869-0710-X.
  17. Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Jeff Grubb (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 2nd edition (revised), A Grand Tour of the Realms. (TSR, Inc), p. 45. ISBN 1-5607-6617-4.
  18. 18.0 18.1 Eric Haddock (1994). Cormyr. (TSR, Inc), p. 36. ISBN 1-56076-818-5.
  19. Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume I). (TSR, Inc), p. 83. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  20. Ed Greenwood (November 1998). The City of Ravens Bluff. (TSR, Inc), p. 44. ISBN 0-7869-1195-6.
  21. Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume I). (TSR, Inc), p. 72. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  22.  (July 2007). Monster Manual V. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 133. ISBN 0-7869-4115-4.
  23. Rick Swan (July 1990). Monstrous Compendium Kara-Tur Appendix. (TSR, Inc.), p. 58. ISBN 0-88038-851-X.
  24. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 25. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  25. Eric L. Boyd, Erik Mona (May 2002). Faiths and Pantheons. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 13. ISBN 0-7869-2759-3.
  26. Jeff Grubb (August 1992). Land of Fate (Fortunes and Fates). (TSR, Inc), p. 27. ISBN 978-1560763291.
  27. Ed Greenwood (October 1990). Dwarves Deep. (TSR, Inc.), p. 29. ISBN 0-88038-880-3.
  28. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 151. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  29. Eric L. Boyd, Eytan Bernstein (August 2006). Dragons of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 73. ISBN 0-7869-3923-0.
  30. Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 174. ISBN 978-0786903849.
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