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The Seldarine (Elvish for "fellowship of brothers and sisters of the wood") was the elven pantheon of gods that resided on the astral dominion of Arvandor under the leadership of Corellon Larethian.[2]

MembersEdit

Members of the Seldarine have male and female forms, and are often portrayed as both (particularly Corellon), though most as presented as taking on the form of one of the other. In Cormanthor, there were statues of the Seldarine in both their male and female forms.

The many members of the Seldarine included:

  • Greater gods:
    • Corellon Larethian, leader of the Seldarine; he was the elven god of magic, warfare, music, art, and crafts.
    • Angharradh, consort to Corellon; commonly believed to be a combination of three other elven goddesses (Sehanine Moonbow, Aerdrie Faenya, and Hanali Celanil) formed when Lolth rebelled and was exiled. Sometimes described as Corellon's consort.
  • Dead power:
    • Zandilar, goddess of passionate love, lust, and dance.[9]

HistoryEdit

Myths & LoreEdit

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War of the SeldarineEdit

In −30,000 DR,[10][11] Araushnee, with the help of her son Vhaeraun, gathered a host of evil deities opposed to the Seldarine, and convinced them to attack Arvandor, in an attempt to overthrow Corellon.[12] Ghaunadaur entered the fray on his own without being asked by anyone.[13]

She had planned for the assault to ultimately fail, as her actual goal was for his consort to be killed during the battle and to replace him as Coronal of Arvandor.[14] She tricked Eilistraee into dangerously injuring her own father,[15] but the Weaver's conspiracy was ultimately thwarted by Sehanine Moonbow, and Corellon's life was saved.[16] Angharradh arose from the great battle between the Seldarine and the followers of Araushnee. Aerdrie, Hanali and Sehanine came together to heal Corellon Larethian after he was felled by Eilistraee who was fooled by Araushnee. As they did so, they formed Angharradh, serving alongside Corellon as the Queen of Arvandor.[17][18]. After her betrayal was revealed, Araushnee was banished by Corellon and turned into a tanar'ri,[19] while Vhaeraun was simply exiled.[20] Even though she was cleared from all guilt, Eilistraee chose to share her mother's and brother's punishment, because she knew that the drow would need her light in the times to come.[21]

The wizard Mordenkainen recorded a different version of this story. According to him, all elves, including the ones who would become the deities of the Seldarine and of the Dark Seldarine, emerged from the blood that Corellon lost in a fight against Gruumsh. Like their god, the first elves had shape-changing powers, and freedom with them. The Protector took some favorites, who were made deities: among them, Lolth was the most privileged. She saw that other races made something out of their lives, and made the argument that the elves should do the same by casting off their shape-changing powers in exchange of a fixed form, that would allow them to gain dominion over everything. Every single elf agreed and chose such a form, but Corellon was revolted by their decision and railed against Lolth. The god was stopped with the argument that nobody of his blood should be attacked, and, while he was thinking about it, Lolth used the opportunity to attempt to murder him. Realizing the extent of Lolth's betrayal, many elves intervened to stop her, but some remained loyal to the Spider Queen: the latter became the dark elves and their gods, and Lolth became a demon lord of the Abyss.[22] Eilistraee was an exception in this version too, for she did not side with Lolth, but still chose to follow the dark elves.[23] Araushnee took the name of Lolth, and made the 66th layer of the Abyss, the Demonweb Pits, her new home.[24]

Modern HistoryEdit

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The events of the Spellplague affected the Seldarine, though perhaps not as harshly as it did some of the other deities. However, several of the gods, such as Deep Sashelas, Labelas, Solonor, Erevan, Fenmarel, and Shevarash all became exarchs. Corellon and Angaharradh managed to hang on to their original positions, but Hanali became the elven aspect of Sune, and Sehanine of Selune.

After the Second Sundering, order was restored, and the Seldarine was back to the way it was prior to the Spellplague, with Sehanine being described as Corellon's main consort/beloved.

AppendixEdit

Further ReadingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford (May 29, 2018). Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 43–49. ISBN 978-0786966240.
  2. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 73. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  3. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 142. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 Chris Perry (December 1996). “The Seldarine Revisited”. In Pierce Watters ed. Dragon #236 (TSR, Inc.), pp. 11–17, 25.
  5. Skip Williams (February 2005). Races of the Wild. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 23–24. ISBN 0-7869-3438-7.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 121–122. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 Chris Perry (September 1998). “Magic of the Seldarine”. In Dave Gross ed. Dragon #251 (TSR, Inc.), pp. 28–35.
  8. Skip Williams (February 2005). Races of the Wild. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 20. ISBN 0-7869-3438-7.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford (May 29, 2018). Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 43. ISBN 978-0786966240.
  10. Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 8. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  11. Richard Baker, Ed Bonny, Travis Stout (February 2005). Lost Empires of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 51. ISBN 0-7869-3654-1.
  12. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 51. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  13. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 137. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  14. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 50. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  15. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 61–62. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  16. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 65–66. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  17. Eric L. Boyd, Erik Mona (May 2002). Faiths and Pantheons. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 125. ISBN 0-7869-2759-3.
  18. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 97. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  19. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 70–72. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  20. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 67. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  21. Elaine Cunningham (1999). Evermeet: Island of Elves. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 69. ISBN 0-7869-1354-1.
  22. Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford (May 29, 2018). Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 35–36. ISBN 978-0786966240.
  23. Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford (May 29, 2018). Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 55–56. ISBN 978-0786966240.
  24. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 26. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.

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