FANDOM


Selgaunt (pronounced: /ˈsɛlgɒntSELL-gont[6]), formerly known as Chancelgaunt,[7] was a large merchant port on the Sea of Fallen Stars and the capital of the nation of Sembia following the destruction of Ordulin in the late 14th century DR.[5]

The city earned its newer name following the death of the great Sembian merchant-king Selgar, who had been interred beneath an ornate sepulcher within the city.[2]

SocietyEdit

Possibly the wealthiest city on all of Sembia, Selgaunt was an exciting metropolis that featured the high fashions, pageantry and brashness that was so often found in the Eastern Heartlands. The Selgauntans viewed themselves as the epicenter of sophistication, and saw their city as the heart of civilization in all the planes of existence.[2]

CultureEdit

Selgaunt had a rich and active community of artists, dancers, and musicians. New performances of plays, highlighted by choreographed dances and choral arrangements were regularly put on within the city. Paintings, sculptures, carved statues were readily available throughout the city, were highly prized and often exported in trade with other cities.[2][8]

Music was especially prevalent throughout the city, as most Selgauntans could artfully sing and whistle complex melodies. Live performances could often be found in taverns, inns and the houses of noble families. Glaurs, zulkoons and thelarrs were popular instruments during the mid-14th century.[8]

RelationsEdit

The citizens of Selgaunt saw those from the Sword Coast in the west, northerners from the Dalelands and North Faerûn and those southern-folk from the Dragon Coast down to the Lands of Intrigue as filthy, barbarous savages. They thought worse of the people of Calimshan, as they were pretentious on top of everything else. They saw the kingdom of Cormyr as adorable country bumpkins who, despite their "royal" family, lacked proper breeding and sophistication.[8]

They even looked down on the other cities of Sembia as disadvantaged, depressing collectives; Ordulin was unfortunately insignificant, full of small-time merchants who were too busy counting their meager coins and Saerloon was a tired, apathetic city that was well past its prime.[8]

GovernmentEdit

For many years, until the late 14th century,[9] Selgaunt was led by a hereditary merchant-prince known as the Hulorn. However, in the Year of Shadows, 1358 DR, other factions held the real power. These included the Knights of Selgaunt, who answered to the authorities in the capital city of Ordulin, and the influential and independent local noble merchant houses.[2]

Armed ForcesEdit

The combined city guard/armed forces were known as the Scepters.[10] They were 9,000 strong during the mid-14th century and maintained a strong fleet of three dozen ships.[2]

OrganizationsEdit

Selgaunt had two prominent thieves' groups operating within its walls, the Night Knives and the Eyeless Mask of Saerloon. The adventuring company known as the Hunt were also based in the city.[2]

Notable LocationsEdit

  • Foreign District: This area was dominated by warehouses and taverns frequented by merchants and adventurers. It was well-patrolled by the Scepters of Selgaunt.[11][page needed]
Landmarks
Taverns & Inns
Selgaunt

A map of Selgaunt in 1358 DR.

  • Green Gauntlet: A cheap inn located on the northern end of the city's docks.[2][8]
  • The Black Stag: A small and dark establishment favored by the more unsavory residents of Selgaunt.[2]
  • Silver Lion: Deep in the Foreign District, at the intersection of Veset Street and Colls Way. Mostly frequented by merchants, drovers and caravan guards, it was infamous for the beef stew they served.[11]
Temples & Shrines

During the 15th century DR, Selgaunt had the largest Sharran temple in all of Netheril-controlled Sembia, a symbol of the rule of the Netherese overlords.[12]

Residences

HistoryEdit

This section is a stub. You can help us by expanding it.


AppendixEdit

GalleryEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Ed Greenwood (August 1992). “The Everwinking Eye: Words To The Wise”. In Jean Rabe ed. Polyhedron #74 (TSR, Inc.), p. 14–15.
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood (1990). Forgotten Realms Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 104. ISBN 0-8803-8828-5.
  3. Steven E. Schend (1999). Sea of Fallen Stars. (TSR, Inc), p. 5. ISBN 0-7869-1393-2.
  4. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 190. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 176. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  6. Jeff Grubb, Ed Greenwood and Karen S. Martin (1987). Forgotten Realms Campaign Set (Cyclopedia of the Realms). (TSR, Inc), p. 74. ISBN 0-8803-8472-7.
  7. Jeff Grubb, Ed Greenwood and Karen S. Martin (1987). Forgotten Realms Campaign Set (Cyclopedia of the Realms). (TSR, Inc), p. 76. ISBN 0-8803-8472-7.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood (1990). Forgotten Realms Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 105. ISBN 0-8803-8828-5.
  9. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 190. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  10. Various (February 2007). The Halls of Stormweather. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 255. ISBN 978-0-7869-4244-2.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Paul S. Kemp (July 2003). Twilight Falling. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 0-7869-2998-7.
  12. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 176. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  13. Various (February 2007). The Halls of Stormweather. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 5. ISBN 978-0-7869-4244-2.
  14. Paul S. Kemp (April 2007). Shadow's Witness. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 34. ISBN 978-0-7869-4244-2.
  15. Paul S. Kemp (April 2007). Shadow's Witness. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 103. ISBN 978-0-7869-4244-2.
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.