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Selgaunt (pronounced: /ˈsɛlgɒntSELL-gont[20]), formerly known as Chancelgaunt,[3] was a large merchant port on the Sea of Fallen Stars and the capital of the nation of Sembia following the destruction of Ordulin in the late 14th century DR.[17]

Selgaunt. A quarter the size of Waterdeep, but still embroiled in nastiness. Fakery. Mendacity. Rich fat prima donnas attacking rich fat prima donnas. All that I could’ve stood - I was used to it - but caught in the center of this fight was something fine, something noble and beautiful.
— Bolton Quaid[21]

Description[]

The city earned its newer name following the death of the great Sembian merchant-king Selgar, who had been interred beneath an ornate sepulcher within the city.[16]

Selgaunt's most notable feature was the design of its impressive buildings and intricately decorated homes. The city was teeming with grand castles, temples, brownstone tallhouses, marketplaces, emporia,[22] and beautiful mansions. All were surrounded by parks, topiaries, statuary, decorative pools, and a wide variety of complex fountains. The city's crown jewel was the Palace of the Hulorn with its numerous spires seen from afar. The Hunting Garden was the Hulorn's private wildlife preserve enclosed by tall well-guarded walls. It was only accessible to the Hulorn, the royal family, and guests of the Palace.[16][23] Appropriately, the luxurious mansions of the city's old noble families, referred to as the Old Chauncel, were built in the district that surrounded Hulorn's Palace.[24] Many of the grand structures in Selgaunt were built using imported quarried Yhauntan stone.[7]

The High Bridge of Selgaunt over River Arkhen.

The city had several chaotically scattered districts, some of which were quite unremarkable warehouse zones like the Warehouse District. It was located in the south-east,[25] located to the south-west from the Dock District. The Foreign District was dominated by warehouses and taverns frequented by merchants and adventurers. It was well-patrolled by the Scepters of Selgaunt. Cobblestone-paved Rauncel's Ride was the main street of the Foreign District. Tormyn's Way led east from the Foreign District to the wide road of the Temple Avenue. One could easily spot the western entrance to the stone-flagged Avenue of the Temples, outlined by the grand granite archway. The avenue held over a dozen of shrines and five major temples to Milil, Sune, Deneir, Oghma, Lliira, and Siamorphe.[24] The Oxblood Quarter, a district two blocks away from Selgaunt's western gate.[25] In 1300s DR, wealthier districts of Selgaunt, like in other major cities of Faerûn, started constructing tallhouse buildings. These tall and narrow tenements shared walls with adjacent structures and housed a great number of households. Often, these tallhouses were owned by a single individual, and each floor was rented out separately.[26] The Mairen Street, or as locals called it - the "Shop Street", was the hub of mercantile activity in Selgaunt. The street was packed with large two-storied shops, endless street vendors that sold everything from fresh produce to exotic silks, from sweet ices to sausage tarts.[27]

One notable feature that greeted travelers entering Selgaunt through the northern Klaroun Gate was the spacious High Bridge over the Arkhen River. The bridge itself had homes, buildings, a tavern, and a fish market, all tightly built on both sides with Galgorgar's Ride separating both rows of houses. Galgorgar's Ride stretched from the gatehouse to the Rauthauvyr's Road that led to Ordulin.[28]

Geography[]

Selgaunt was built at the mouth of Arkhen River,[2] which emptied into the Inner Sea, sometimes referred to as the "Selgaunt Bay" by uneducated individuals.[16] Just several miles east from the city laid the beaches of Selgaunt. These stretches of ugly and scraggly coast were unfit for farming, unappealing to the eye, and the only notable thing about them were small fisheries and docks. The actual coastline in the city was not much different in appearance.[29]

Flora & Fauna[]

The waters of the so-called "Selgaunt Bay" were commonly visited by peaceful schools of dolphins[30] but also held at least three major kuo-toa lairs. Sahuagin attacks often menaced the coastal stretch to the south of the city.[31] Sharks were yet another aquatic danger of the "Selgaunt Bay." [32] Among more mundane fish found by fishers of Selgaunt were raiks, huge and aggressive creatures, as well as equally big mottled sidi octopi.[33]

Sandy shores near Selgaunt were also home to a deadly and venomous species of an aquatic beach snake that hid in the tidal pools after tides receded. This creature was unique to the "Selgaunt Bay." [34] The waters of the Arkhen River were home to aggressive water weirds.[35]

The skylines and wizardly laboratories of Selgaunt were homes to rare magical creatures known as guardgoyles who served the city's many arcane spellcasters.[36]

Dwarf maples grew along the Temple avenue of Selgaunt, decorating the district's public sitting contemplation areas. In the fall, the dwarf trees were lit with beautiful red and yellow canopies. The trees harboured a large number of starlings who early decorated marble statues of manticores, chimerae, and owlbears with their droppings.[24]

Like in so many sewer systems across the land, sewers of Selgaunt were pocked with deep alcoves that served as shelter to rats, other vermin, and even srange quatic vampires. The sewage flowed north-east, towards drainage in the Selgaunt Bay.[37]

Climate[]

Selgaunt was located in a temperate climate territory. The city saw snowfall in the winter as well as frequent regular or ice fogs. Due to windy weather, rainfall tended to be short and usually was limited to mornings and mid-afternoons. Daytime was often cloudy with fogs swelling overnight, leaving frosted rooftops and tall spires by dawn.[38]

Government[]

For many years, until the late 14th century,[39] Selgaunt was led by a hereditary merchant-prince known as the Hulorn. However, in the Year of Shadows, 1358 DR, other factions held the real power. These included the Knights of Selgaunt, who answered to the authorities in the capital city of Ordulin, and the influential and independent local noble merchant houses.[16] The Council of Sembia, or the Consortium Princes, were joint political rulers of Saerloon, Selgaunt, and all of Sembia. The organization issued ambassadors to neighboring countries, such as Cormyr, who were authorized to negotiate trade and military assistance.[40]

The power in the 14th century DR was in the hands of the Hulorn and the Old Chauncel, the old nobility of Selgaunt.[19] In the 15th century DR, the position was renamed to the Chief Administrator of Sembia, the Lord High Governor, while the Netherese overlords held the true power until the Second Sundering.[41][17]

Laws[]

The nobles of Selgaunt slew one another often enough in formal duels, impromptu brawls, and, occasionally, open warfare. But it simply wasn't acceptable to murder one's hostess or to resort to bloodshed to win a supposedly friendly, peaceable competition, even if, transported by the passions of the moment, Chenna appeared to have forgotten that particular point of etiquette.

In the 14th century Hulorn did nothing to stop or even limit the drug and flesh trade in the streets of Selgaunt. Prostitution was a profitable business, and those who traded in vices were just as respected as merchants who dealt in exotic Chultan spices. This was a common point of view well illustrated by a popular saying: "Business is business."[43] Piracy, on the other hand, was shunned by society, including anyone suspected of association. The laws were extremely strict and cruel to those who were convicted of piracy: one month of excruciating labor in the city harbor, followed by amputation of the convict's hands. When the charges were severe, the breaking of limbs also followed the amputation. The wounds were not allowed to be healed by magic as "the pain will be their teacher."[44]

Trade[]

A new fad emerged in 1367 DR. A sweet milky alcoholic beverage known as Selgite ice wine, or simply "ice wine," began being sold by Ghalivar Braceltar. The wine quickly gained popularity across Sembia and captured the tastes of people from across the Sea of Fallen Stars.[11] Another local wine that was exported out of the city was Usk Fine Old, a fine Sembian libation.[12] During the same time, Selgites were attempting to crack the recipe for the unique kuo-toa glue, used on the fish-folk's shields. The attempts were only half-successful. The glue's adhesive qualities and strength were on par with the kuo-toan substance. However, it quickly dried out and became useless. This kuo-toa glue imitation found use as a severe restraining method for especially rowdy prisoners.[45]

Locally-crafted musical instruments were one of the main expots of Selgaunt. Instruments such as violins, rebecs, harpsichords, psalteries and silver harps were sold across the Realms via Aurora's Emporium.[46][16] Aurora also sold soaps[47] and black raisins from Selgaunt.[13]

Even though Selgaunt had a sewer system, a group of people, known as the ""nightcarters". The lowest of the jobs one could get in the city, scraping dung off Selgaunt's streets and selling it to local farmers for mere coppers.[37]

Currency[]

Cut gemstones were a preferred major alternative currency among merchants and traders of Selgaunt. The main advantage of using gems as currency was the ease of transportation and guarding, compared to that of coin. Due to that, a sizable black market developed in Selgaunt that dealt in cutting, setting, and reselling stolen precious stones.[15]

Society[]

Members of House Uskevren, demonstrating Selgite fashion sensibilities.

Possibly the wealthiest city on all of Sembia, Selgaunt was an exciting metropolis that featured the high fashions, pageantry, and brashness that was so often found in the Eastern Heartlands. The Selgauntans viewed themselves as the epicenter of sophistication and saw their city as the heart of civilization in all the planes of existence.[16]

Culture[]

Selgaunt had a rich and active community of artists, dancers, and musicians. New performances of plays, highlighted by choreographed dances and choral arrangements, were regularly put on within the city. Paintings, sculptures, carved statues were readily available throughout the city, were highly prized and often exported in trade with other cities.[16][48]

Music was especially prevalent throughout the city, as most Selgauntans could artfully sing and whistle complex melodies. Live performances could often be found in taverns, inns, and the houses of noble families. Glaurs, zulkoons and thelarrs were popular instruments during the mid-14th century.[48] Nobility of Selgaunt had constantly changing fashions Events such as pastorales were popular summer activities. One year, pastorales consisted of noblewomen dressed in what they thought were commoners' clothing. They played pretend to be simple rustics at lavish farms while listening to minstrels performing songs about the countryside and manual labor.[49]

To keep track of time, Selgaunt employed a small army of hour-callers who loudly proclaimed hours on the city streets. Additionally, Milil's Temple of Song had a huge bell that tolled hourly.[24]

Fashion[]

Sembia, Selgaunt especially, was a capital of fashion and luxury. Women of noble birth could be seen wearing sophisticated coiffures with dyed highlights of striking colors, assembled by the best hairdressers of the city. Even the simplest clothes in design were created using finest cambricand and sarcanet. Red lips dyed with fucus was a fashionable type of make-up.[50]

Cuisine[]

Selgauntans, especially the rich and noble, were quite fond of imported wines, such as Berduskan Dark and Arabellan Dry.[51] Domesticated fowl was a part of local food culture, luxurious dishes such as nut-roasted goose were served at the nobles' social events.[52] Foods, fried in red pepper oil, were quite common.[53] Fruit like sunmelon and grape were consumed as well. Grapes were dried into raisins,[13] while sunmelon rind was a food found in taverns and served along with many other small bite-sized treats,[54] such as ruth-balls.[55] Among simpler foods, Selgauntans ate chicken stews, breads, and huge amounts of soft sharp goat cheese.[24] As for those with a sweet tooth, Selgaunt was faomus for its candy. Unlike more subtle sweetmeats from Shou Lung, Selgauntan candy was overwhelming in flavor.[56]

Selgauntans cookery had one curious quirk. The term "dice" was used to describe a uniform shape and quantity of butter, while it was referred to kitchen knifework in other parts of the world. Dice meant a cube of butter of the same shape and side as the gaming dice. To accommodate this measurement system, most butter sold in Selgaunt was packaged in long fingers, pre-marked for the ease of measuring and cutting.[57]

Relations[]

The citizens of Selgaunt saw those from the Sword Coast in the west, northerners from the Dalelands and North Faerûn and that southern-folk from the Dragon Coast down to the Lands of Intrigue as filthy, barbarous savages. They thought worse of the people of Calimshan, as they were pretentious on top of everything else. They saw the kingdom of Cormyr as adorable country bumpkins who, despite their "royal" family, lacked proper breeding and sophistication.[48]

They even looked down on the other cities of Sembia as disadvantaged, depressing collectives; Ordulin was unfortunately insignificant, full of small-time merchants who were too busy counting their meager coins, and Saerloon was a tired, apathetic city that was well past its prime.[48]

Defenses[]

The combined city guard/armed forces were known as Scepters.[58] They were 9,000 strong during the mid-14th century and maintained a strong fleet of three dozen ships.[16] Scepters were outfited in black leather armor, green cloaks, and silver-hilted swords.[24]

History[]

Selgaunt's position on a map of Sembia in the late-14th century DR.

Long before Selgaunt's lands were settled, the devastating destruction of three Netherese conclaves took place in -1660 DR. The explosions formed what would eventually be known as the "Selgaunt Bay." [59]

The cities of Chondathan (Saerloon) and Chancelgaunt (Selgaunt) were established circa 380s DR by traders and merchants of Chondath.[18] The first major threat to Chondathan and Chancelgaunt came in the Year of the Blue Shield, 400 DR, when the defenses of both settlements were crumbling under constant assault by orc and goblin tribes. Without help, the cities were sure to be destroyed. Chondath sent almost half of its armed forces to fortify the cities and secure the fledgling country's territories. The region was secured; however, the raids and conflicts with the savage humanoids continued for the next 15 years.[1]

Following the disastrous Rotting War of the Year of the Queen's Tears, 902 DR, cities of Chondathan and Chancelgaunt gained independance from Chondath.[60] The country of Sembia was born in the Year of the Watching Raven, 913 DR and the city of Chancelgaunt was renamed to Selgaunt, honoring the prolific merchant-king Selgar.[60] The same year, the Cult of the Dragon established a cell in Selgaunt.[61]

Sometime before 1281 DR, a covert war erupted between the criminal underbellies of Selgaunt and Westgate. The conflict was sparked by a hin thief Deder Seven Fingers who was trying to recover his stolen treasure - The Salamander's Tongue. In the process, Deder and his Westgate allies culled a number of rogues of Selgaunt. In retaliation, Selgite crimelords hired Pieter the Feeble, a priest of Mask, who, in turn, succumbed to avarice, stole The Salamander's Tongue and manipulated both cities' crimelords into all-out war.[33]

In the Year of the Deep Moon, 1294 DR, pirate leader Methlas was assassinated by his lieutenant Thevren, who and sent his fleet of 40 ships to attack Saerloon and Selgaunt. The attacks were startling successes for the pirate fleet.[62]

In the Year of the Prince, 1357 DR, the adventuring Company of the Black Buckler ventured into the ruins of Myth Drannor on behest of a ring of anonymous investors in Selgaunt. The Company was never seen after.[63]

In Ches of the Year of the Prince, 1357 DR, Captain's Strauph Omerehellin's trade caravel from Selgaunt, the Ratclaw, disappeared while traveling to Hillsfar. The ship carried southern dates, nuts and olive oil. The reason for its deisapearace was never uncovered, however some blamed pirates, ice, or even more outlandish culprits. Selgaunt was rumored to prepare a search fleet headed for the Pirate Isles.[64] In Eleasis of the same year, gemstone smuggled out of Cormyrean mies in the High Horn surfaced in several cities, including Selgaunt.[65]

A strange incident happened in the Year of the Wave, 1364 DR. A legendary artifact - the Mask of Mysteries, started appearing in Selgaunt 9 years prior, worn by a mysterious individual only known as the Masked Lady during evening noble balls and festivities. Even though the identity of the Lady was unknown, it was quite obvious that that Mask was in the hands of one of the noble families of Selgaunt. The incident occurred when a thief attempted to take Masked Lady's jewelry and the Mask. The moment the thief removed the artifact, the Lady's face discharged a wriggling cluster of tentacles, similar to those of a mind flayer. The main difference being the Lady's tentacles were gray and ended in terrifying teethed maws. The aberrant creature ate the unfortunate thief's face and hands, and after becoming a pin cushion for guards' arrows, the Lady fled into the night along with the Mask of Mysteries.[66]

At some point before 1367 DR, a rich and powerful wizard Osper Linthalam used his staff of power to incinerate a pirate ship in the docks of Selgaunt. The pirates were attempting to raid the merchant's warehouse at the same time as he was inventorying his goods. The impressive display of wizardly powers was well remembered by the Selgites.[67]

In the Year of the Banner, 1368 DR, a notorious thief Polly Thax infiltrated the Palace of the Hulorn's exhibition hall in the guise of a cleaning girl. Andeth Ilchammer, the Hulorn of the time caught Polly, but the thief used her feminine wiles to gain access to the Eyes of the Sea Queen, two priceless pearls the size of oranges. While the aging ruler was busy fondling her underskirts, Polly Thax used her trusty blackjack to knock Andeth Ilchammer out and get away with the treasures. The rogue reached her ship in Selgaunt's harbor, and shortly after departing, one of the guard's heavy vessels gave chase. Unbeknownst to most, Toril was under the unruly effects of the goddesses Tymora and Beshaba's powers running wild. Sparked by Beshaba's ill luck, a giant wave swelled in the Sea of Fallen Stars and crashed into Selgaunt's harbor, tossing the pursing vessel along with other ships into the streets of the city. The wall of water crushed many of the dockside buildings. Parts of the city harbors were washed away into the sea. Even bigger than the first one, the second tidal wave swallowed Polly Thax's ship and crashed into the shores two miles south of Selgaunt. There were no survivors.[68]

The Year of the Tankard, 1370 DR saw a concerning rise of Eyeless Mask abductions in cities of Saerloon and [elgaunt. The shadowy organization was raising funds to expand into Daerlun. One of the Eyeless Mask's victims was a Blanchard Wyvernwalk who was murdered during a botched abduction attempt. Some of the noble families Selgaunt who monetarily supported the Cult of the Dragons demanded protection and retaliation from their clandestine allies.[69] In Mirtul of the same year the aquatic elf cities of of Selu'Maraar and Naramyr established trade routes with Suzail of Cormyr and Selgaunt of Sembia.[70] Later in 1370 DR, Thay was allowed to established an enclave in Selgaunt.[71]

On Kythorn 20th of the Year of Lightning Storms, 1374 DR, Thamalon Uskevren II was elected Hulorn of Selgaunt.[72] By Uktar 11th of the same year, unrest in Sembia brought wariness of looming civil war. Threatened by such prospect, Selgaunt entered an alliance and trade pacts with a lost Netherese enclave of Sakkors emerged from the Sea of Fallen Stars earlier in the month, on Uktar 2nd. On Uktar 29th, Saerloon used teleportation circles to transport its armies to the gates of Selgaunt and on Uktar 30th, the Battle of Selgaunt commenced. Even though Saerloon was allied with a green dragon Vendemniharan, Selgaunt emerged victorious with the aid of Princes of Shade — Rivalen and Brennus Tanthul. The armies of Saerloon were broken and captured.[73]

For the century that followed, Thamalon Uskevren II remained the Hulorn. His position was officially renamed to the chief administrator of Sembia, the Lord High Governor, and his body transformed into a shade. The country was in an unstable state, plagued by demon cults and resistance cells that opposed the Princes of Shade. However, resistance was mostly squashed by the Netherese by Year of the Narthex Murders, 1482 DR,[17] even though the alliance came to an end with Sakkors's destruction during the Second Sundering.[41]

In the spring of the Year of the Godly Invitation, 1449 DR, a strange Sword of Spells started seemingly random daring and stabbing wizards in several cities across Faerûn. Selgaunt was swept by a seies of Sword's attacks that ended as swiftly as they started.[74]

In the 15th century DR, a strange "dungeon" was discovered underneath Selgaunt. A mysterious and sprawling labyrinth that connected many cellars of the city, filled with treasures and suspiciousely non-lethal traps. Teir nature remained a mistery while some speculated that these dungeons were created by illithids for some nefarious reson.[75] A colorful merchant from the Abyss named Hurluu started visiting Sembian cities of Selgaunt and Saerloon through a set of well-hidden secret gates. This new competitor angered a cabal of local traders of Selgaunt who tried to have Hurluu elliminated. In response, the abyssal dealer poisoned wine casks that were on route to the homes of his mercantile enemies. This stunt killed many of his opponents as well as innocent bystanders in the city.[76]

Rumors & Legends[]

  • The tomb of Selgaunt's namesake, the great Sembian merchant-king Selgar, was rumored to hold unspeakable treasures, buried alongside the famed leader. Even though the treasure remained a mystery, it was known for sure that the tomb was filled with deadly traps and guardians that killed several ambitious thieves over the city's history.[16]
  • It was rumored that malaugrym named Orglym murdered and consumed an important merchant Ostil of Selgaunt. The creature was said to have assumed the merchant's identity.[77]
  • In the 15th century DR, rumors placed the Fringe Grounds straight underneath the city of Selgaunt. The Netherese shadow caravans used the cavern. The magics were channeled through rune-carved elemental earth nodes, allowing the caravans to travel to the Shadowfell. Other rumors claimed the Fringe Grounds were hidden within the Ordulin Maelstrom, or some valley in the Thunder Peaks.[17]
  • A demongate, one of the so-called Abyssal Tradeways was located within the walls of Selgaunt and Saerloon. These gates allowed trades from the Abyss to travel between the infinite layers and Toril. These traders were quite clandestine, and the exact location of the Saerlunan demongate was a well-kept secret.[76]
  • The city of Selgaunt was rumored to be home to powerful halfling wizards who kept their powers secret from all but their kin.[38]

Notable Locations[]

Landmarks[]

  • Palace of the Hulorn, the seat of power in Selgaunt.[48]
  • Palace of Beauty, the amphitheater built by Andeth Ilchammar curca 1370 DR. It functioned as a concert hall and an art gallery while being a gaudy architectural atrocity.[78]
  • Hunting Garden, a walled up private plot of wildwoods adjacent to the Palace, used by the Hulorn as the private hunting ground, stocked with mundane game and dangerous magical beasts.[48][23]
  • Peeing statue of a long dead failed dictator. The fountain was erected as an act of disrespect and defiance. Even though the dictator's descendants were still wealthy and living in Selgaunt as of late 15th century, the fountain was still in use due to enchantments that purified saltwater. Drinkable water from the peeing fountain was pumped through the city.[79]

Taverns & Inns[]

  • The Black Stag, a small and dark establishment favored by the more unsavory residents of Selgaunt.[16]
  • Caerezmur's Cauldron, the favorite tavern of the Blades of the Cauldron, a band of high-bred Sembian shordfighters in the late-15th century DR.[80]
  • Green Gauntlet, a cheap inn located on the northern end of the city's docks.[16][48]
  • Outlook Inn, a clean and moderatley-priced inn built in the 14th century DR.[16]
  • Silver Lion, located deep in the Foreign District, at the intersection of Veset Street and Colls Way. Mostly frequented by merchants, drovers and caravan guards, it was infamous for the beef stew they served.[81]
  • The Workbench was a shabby carboard-walled tavern and eatery few blocked off Rauncel's Ride in the Foreign District.[24]

Shops & Mrchants[]

  • Boldnose Locks & Finework, a humble metalwork and lockmith shop on the Duskvale Street, ran by Oelin Boldnose circa 1367 DR.[82]
  • Sheathed Dagger Coster, a trading coaster that moved between Selgaunt and the Dalelands.[8]

Temples & Shrines[]

Residences[]

Inhabitants[]

Shamur Uskevren and another example of Selgite fashion.

Notable Houses[]

  • Foxmantle, a noble house renowned for their superb horse-breeding.[89]
  • Karn, a noble mechant family that was ruined by a seried of disastrous trading ventures by the late-14th ventury DR.[49]
  • Talendar, the oldest and richest noble family in Sembia. Among their enemies was House Uskevren.[50]
  • Uskevren, an old noble family that built their wealth via illicit means.[90]

Notable Organizations[]

  • Eyeless Mask, one of the two major thieves' groups in the city.[16] Mask's goal was enslavement or destruction of all wizards, clerics, and nobility.[69]
  • Guardians of the Weave, an organization of goodly spellcasters that opposed evil wizards and their abuse of the weave.[91]
  • Harpers had several agents active in the city in the late-14th century DR, mamely Orsar Foxwind and Oelin Boldnose,[82] and in the late-15th century DR - Andremmos Skalander and Hathemmor the Dark.[92]
  • Moonstars, the organization maintained presence in Selgaunt via sage Deior Rasthavin in the late-14th century DR.[93]
  • Night Knives, a prominent indipendant thieves' guild.[16][94]
  • Red Wizards of Thay had the leader of covert operations, Naglatha, in the city under the quise of a simpe antique dealer on the Larwaken Lane until her fall from grace in 1373 DR.[69][95]
  • Seekers of Forgotten Dooms, a secretive wizardly cabal who performed dangerous experiments with planar magics in the late-15th century DR.[96]
  • Six Coffers Market Priakos, a wealthy merchant organization based out of Waterdeep, Silverymoon, Priapurl, and Selgaunt. In the mid-14th centry DR Ultramm helmed the Selgaunt's branch.[97]
  • Zhentarim, the Black Network had presense and maintained influence in Selgaunt and wider Sembia.[98]

Notable Adventuring Companies[]

  • Bold Bravos, a reckless adventuring troupe that helmed as assault on the Wyvernfang circa 1360 DR.[99]
  • Brundabuld's Reavers, a veteran monster-slayer group active in the 14th century DR.[100]
  • Golden Griffon Eyes, an all-female adventuring company that was hired by the Crown of Cormyr in 1341 DR.[101]
  • The Hunt, an adventuring group that was based out of Selgaunt with regular forays into Sembia, Cormyr, the Dalelands, and the Moonsea regions, actinve in the 14th century DR.[16][102]
  • Landeluck's Doomarrow, a short-lived adventuring troupe that ventured into the Underdark in the 15th century DR.[103]
  • Stray Thoughts, a Sembian adventuring company of psionically gifted individuals, led by Jacenelle Traen in the late-14th century DR.[104]

Notable Individuals[]

Young Thamalon Uskevren II, future Hulorn of Selgaunt.

  • Askarran, a Master Sage of Selgaunt circa 1362 DR.[105]
  • Breth Alkin, a Loremaster of Oghma in the late-15th century DR.[106]
  • Chaspra, a manipulative and ambitious wizard who played with politics and men's hearts in the late-14th century DR.[16]
  • Garth the Gimble, a well-connected rogue, active circa 1358 DR.[107]
  • Nalabar of Selgaunt, a traveling minstrel, active in the late-14th century DR.[108]
  • Naglatha, a businesswoman, a spymaster, and a ranking member of the sisnter Red Wizards of Thay in the late-14th century DR.[109]
  • Narve Dwarfkin, a renowned dwarven adventurer in the late-14th century DR.[16]
  • Flame, a mysterious thief and arsonist circa 1358 DR.[16]
  • Talasker Haladeir, a scion of the rich House Haladeir, a manygoods-trading family, active in the late-15th century DR.[110]

Appendix[]

Appearances[]

Adventures
Referenced only
Marco Volo: JourneyVale of the Dragon OracleMurder in Baldur's Gate
Novels
Tymora's LuckThe Halls of StormweatherShadow's WitnessThe Shattered MaskBlack WolfHeirs of ProphecySands of the SoulLord of StormweatherThe Crimson GoldTwilight FallingMidnight's MaskShadowbredShadowstormShadowrealm
Referenced only
SpellfireCrown of FireAll Shadows FledElminster in HellElminster's DaughterSoldiers of IceMurder in CormyrMasqueradesWhisper of WavesMistress of the NightQueen of the DepthsDawn of NightPlague of Spells
Short Stories
Shamur's WagerGarden of SoulsAnd All the Sinners, Saints • • Haunted: A Tale of Sembia
Video Games
Referenced only
Baldur's GateIcewind Dale

Gallery[]

References[]

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