Shugenja (pronounced: /ʃgɛnɑːshoo-gen-jah[5]) (also spelled shukenja[6]) were wielders of divine magic who controlled elemental forces.[7] In Shou Lung, shugenja were called dang-ki[8] (pronounced: /dɑːŋkidahng-kee[9])

Culture[edit | edit source]

Unlike sohei, shugenja were not bound to their monastery or temple, instead wandering the land. A new shugenja received training in a monastery. This training focused on meditation, ritual and self-defense. In Kara-Tur, shugenja performed a variety of services, including marriages, defeating evil spirits, funeral rites and purification rituals.[10]

Shugenja lived by strict principles laid down by their religions. They took vows of poverty and had no connections to their family or clan or the caste systems found across Kara-Tur. They avoided violence and lived a life of discipline.[10]

Abilities[edit | edit source]

Shugenja were skilled spell-casters. They had limited training in martial arts or use of weapons, using their divine magic abilities to defend themselves or others. A shugenja can use their ki to protect themselves from physical and mental attacks.[10]

Notable Shungenja[edit | edit source]

Appendix[edit | edit source]

See Also[edit | edit source]

Further Reading[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. James Wyatt (October 2001). Oriental Adventures (3rd edition). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 17. ISBN 0-7869-2015-7.
  2. Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume I). (TSR, Inc), p. 16. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  3. James Wyatt (October 2001). Oriental Adventures (3rd edition). (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 24–27. ISBN 0-7869-2015-7.
  4. Gary Gygax, David Cook, and François Marcela-Froideval (1985). Oriental Adventures. (TSR, Inc), pp. 14, 22–23. ISBN 0-8803-8099-3.
  5. James Wyatt (October 2001). Oriental Adventures (3rd edition). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 251. ISBN 0-7869-2015-7.
  6. Gary Gygax, David Cook, and François Marcela-Froideval (1985). Oriental Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 56. ISBN 0-8803-8099-3.
  7. James Wyatt (October 2001). Oriental Adventures (3rd edition). (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 24–27. ISBN 0-7869-2015-7.
  8. Curtis Smith and Rick Swan (1990). Ronin Challenge. (TSR, Inc), p. 2. ISBN 0-88038-749-1.
  9. James Wyatt (October 2001). Oriental Adventures (3rd edition). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 249. ISBN 0-7869-2015-7.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 Gary Gygax, David Cook, and François Marcela-Froideval (1985). Oriental Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 23. ISBN 0-8803-8099-3.
  11. Nigel Findley (1990). Ninja Wars. (TSR, Inc), p. 43. ISBN 0-8803-8895-1.
  12. Curtis Smith and Rick Swan (1990). Ronin Challenge. (TSR, Inc), p. 91. ISBN 0-88038-749-1.
  13. David "Zeb" Cook (1987). Blood of the Yakuza (Encounter Construction Booklet). (TSR, Inc), p. 1. ISBN 0-88038-401-8.
  14. David Cook (1986). Swords of the Daimyo (Province Book of Miyama). (TSR, Inc), p. 28. ISBN 0-88038-273-2.
  15. Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume II). (TSR, Inc), p. 137. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  16. David Cook (1986). Swords of the Daimyo (Province Book of Miyama). (TSR, Inc), p. 31. ISBN 0-88038-273-2.
  17. Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume II). (TSR, Inc), p. 125. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.
  18. Mike Pondsmith, Jay Batista, Rick Swan, John Nephew, Deborah Christian (1988). Kara-Tur: The Eastern Realms (Volume II). (TSR, Inc), p. 153. ISBN 0-88038-608-8.

Connections[edit | edit source]

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