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Silavene's was a popular festhall in the Castle Ward of Waterdeep circa the Year of Wild Magic, 1372 DR.[1][2]

LocationEdit

Silavene's was the first building on the left when ascending the steep gravel road[2][3] that was the Cliffride. The Cliffride was accessible from Julthoon Street not far from West Gate. Silavene's neighbors included the Fair Winds rental villa (C2) on the opposite side of the lane and down a few paces, and further up the road was the New Olamn school for bards (C72).[4] For many years, one of the Walking Statues was perched atop Gull Leap at the end of Julthoon Street.[5][6] By the Year of the Tankard, 1370 DR, the statue known as the Sahuagin Humbled, was practically in Silavene's back yard, kneeling toward the House of Heroes to the north.[7][8]

WDH-FieldOfTriumph

Map showing location of the Sahuagin Humbled, circa 1492 DR. Click to enlarge.

In winter, the Cliffride was frequently blocked by snowfall, but with the establishment of New Olamn and the popularity of Silavene's, the road was regularly cleared by the Loyal Order of Street Laborers.[2]

StructureEdit

Silavene's was formerly a villa known as Marblehearth[9][10][11] and was a three-story sprawling building made of stone.[1][5] In warm weather, the grounds behind the main building were partitioned into private arbors and bowers festooned with decorative flora and flowering spreadleaf plants. Up a narrow path behind Silavene's was a vegetation-screened nook that contained a gate-stone. This magical device was part of the network of portals known as Lost Princess Road.[12]

ServicesEdit

This festhall was a popular casino for various types of gambling.[11] It also provided escorts and had courtesans on staff.[12]

DefensesEdit

As of the 1370s DR, Silavene's had human guards at the front doors and the back doors were enchanted to become three helmed horrors if the locks or hinges were tampered with, either by magical or forceful means. The doors had armor plating and the guardians would also appear if the outer layer was breached.[12]

HistoryEdit

This structure was originally a villa christened Marblehearth, built by a wealthy Waterdhavian noble family many years before the Year of the Prince, 1357 DR.[5][9] The location was tucked away from the bustling city and easily defensible, but was constantly exposed to wind and storms from the sea and almost permanently damp from the moisture brought in by those winds. When the weather turned cold, everything became covered in treacherous ice. The owners quickly grew tired of the cold and damp and moved to warmer climes while renting out the villa for 25 to 50 gold pieces per month, depending on the season.[9][10]

Sometime around the Year of the Banner, 1368 DR, Marblehearth was bought by Setara bint Aasim, a wealthy money-changer from far-off Zakhara[13] who came to Waterdeep via Calimshan[14] and established Silavene's.[11]

Rumors & LegendsEdit

The mysterious owner of Silavene's, Setara bint Aasim, was rumored to have two genies at her beck and call.[11] This rumor was somewhat corroborated by Ampratines, a djinni and servant to Tertius Wands of the noble Wands family, who felt that Silavene's owner was much more dangerous than she appeared to be, especially to his kind.[15]

AppendixEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Eric L. Boyd (June 2005). City of Splendors: Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 98. ISBN 0-7869-3693-2.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). “Campaign Guide”. City of Splendors (TSR, Inc), p. 46. ISBN 0-5607-6868-1.
  3. Eric L. Boyd (June 2005). City of Splendors: Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 96. ISBN 0-7869-3693-2.
  4. Eric L. Boyd (June 2005). City of Splendors: Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 99. ISBN 0-7869-3693-2.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Ed Greenwood (January 1993). Volo's Guide to Waterdeep. (TSR, Inc.), p. 9. ISBN 1-56076-335-3.
  6. Eric L. Boyd (June 2005). City of Splendors: Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 21. ISBN 0-7869-3693-2.
  7. Christopher Perkins, James Haeck, James Introcaso, Adam Lee, Matthew Sernett (September 2018). Waterdeep: Dragon Heist. Edited by Jeremy Crawford. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 183. ISBN 978-0-7869-6625-7.
  8. Map by Jason Engle included in Christopher Perkins, James Haeck, James Introcaso, Adam Lee, Matthew Sernett (September 2018). Waterdeep: Dragon Heist. Edited by Jeremy Crawford. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 978-0-7869-6625-7.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 Ed Greenwood (1987). Waterdeep and the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 23. ISBN 0-88038-490-5.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Ed Greenwood (January 1993). Volo's Guide to Waterdeep. (TSR, Inc.), p. 10. ISBN 1-56076-335-3.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). “Adventurer's Guide to the City”. City of Splendors (TSR, Inc), p. 20. ISBN 0-5607-6868-1.
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 Ed Greenwood (Februry 2000). “The New Adventures of Volo: Lost Princess Road”. In Dave Gross ed. Dragon #268 (Wizards of the Coast), p. 91.
  13. Nicky Rea (1994). Corsairs of the Great Sea (Adventures in the Corsair Domains). (TSR, Inc), p. 14. ISBN 978-1560768678.
  14. Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). “Secrets of the City”. City of Splendors (TSR, Inc), p. 6. ISBN 0-5607-6868-1.
  15. Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). “Who's Who in Waterdeep”. City of Splendors (TSR, Inc), p. 28. ISBN 0-5607-6868-1.