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Sohei (pronounced: /shɛsoh-heh[1]) were special warrior-priests that could be found in Kara-Tur and the Hordelands.[2] In Shou Lung, they were called no-sheng[3] (pronounced: /nʃɛŋnoh-sheng[1]) Sohei were similar to paladins found in Faerûn.[4]

CultureEdit

Sohei usually served as guardians for monasteries.[2] While they were clerics similar to shugenja, they focused more on their military training. They structured their lives around religious principles, but not as strictly as a shugenja. These principles included vegetarianism and discipline. Sohei were often dedicated to their duties to the point of fanaticism. An individual from any caste may train to be a sohei. Upon entering the service of a monastery, they shed all family or clan connections. A soheis status is based on the power and importance of their monastery, and honor is very important to a sohei, similar to ninjas. Most sohei are human or hengeyokai, although some monastaries have accepted korobokuru, nezumi and vanara into their orders.[5][4]

AbilitiesEdit

To defend their monasteries or temples from attacks, Sohei trained extensively with weapons as well as martial arts. They also possessed limited magical powers.[2] Sohei can access their ki abilities to go into a berserker-like frenzy. Sohei were able to cast some divine spells, but did not have access to as many divine spells that a shugenja had. [5] A sohei who was dismissed from their order lost the ability to cast divine spells.[6]

Notable SoheiEdit

AppendixEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 James Wyatt (October 2001). Oriental Adventures (3rd edition). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 251. ISBN 0-7869-2015-7.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Troy Denning (1990). Storm Riders. (TSR, Inc), p. 3. ISBN 0-88038-834-X.
  3. Curtis Smith and Rick Swan (1990). Ronin Challenge. (TSR, Inc), p. 2. ISBN 0-88038-749-1.
  4. 4.0 4.1 James Wyatt (October 2001). Oriental Adventures (3rd edition). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 27. ISBN 0-7869-2015-7.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Gary Gygax, David Cook, and François Marcela-Froideval (1985). Oriental Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 24. ISBN 0-8803-8099-3.
  6. James Wyatt (October 2001). Oriental Adventures (3rd edition). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 28. ISBN 0-7869-2015-7.
  7. David "Zeb" Cook (1986). Swords of the Daimyo. (TSR, Inc), p. 21. ISBN 0-88038-273-2.
  8. Troy Denning (1990). Storm Riders (Cover sheet). (TSR, Inc.). ISBN 9-781560-765646.
  9. David "Zeb" Cook (1986). Swords of the Daimyo. (TSR, Inc), p. 12. ISBN 0-88038-273-2.
  10. David Cook (1986). Swords of the Daimyo (Province Book of Miyama). (TSR, Inc), p. 25. ISBN 0-88038-273-2.
  11. David "Zeb" Cook (1987). Blood of the Yakuza (Encounter Construction Booklet). (TSR, Inc), p. 3. ISBN 0-88038-401-8.
  12. Jeff Grubb (1988). Mad Monkey vs the Dragon Claw. (TSR, Inc). ISBN 0-88038-624-X.
  13. Curtis Smith and Rick Swan (1990). Ronin Challenge. (TSR, Inc), p. 93. ISBN 0-88038-749-1.
  14. David Cook (1986). Swords of the Daimyo (Province Book of Miyama). (TSR, Inc), p. 26. ISBN 0-88038-273-2.
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