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A sphere of annihilation was a magic item that consumed everything it touched, but could be somewhat controlled mentally.[1][3][4][6][7]

DescriptionEdit

The object was actually a void in the fabric of the multiverse and was utterly black such that no amount of light could penetrate it or reflect off of it. The sphere was 2 feet (60 centimeters) in diameter and remained motionless, hovering in position, until acted upon by a mental push from a sentient being.[1][3][4][7][6]

PowersEdit

The surface of the sphere essentially destroyed whatever it touched. Some described it as being sucked into the void with no chance of resistance or recovery, even by a wish or similar magics.[3][4][7][6] However, the sphere was considered a minor artifact by some[8] and this was evidenced by the immunity that other artifacts seemed to have against being drawn into the void.[1] There were also reports of beings who survived coming in contact with a sphere, but they suffered grievous wounds as if struck by a tremendous force.[1][5] And finally, divine intervention was a possible path to restoration from annihilation,[4] but getting the attention of a deity to ask a boon was generally fraught with risk.

The sphere was partially responsive to mental commands of movement, with beings of higher intelligence having a better chance of success. The black hole always moved when someone attempted to control it, but not always in the desired direction. A failure was typically indicated by the sphere moving toward the creature that was making the attempt.[1][3][4][7][6] If two or more people attempted to control the sphere simultaneously, even cooperatively, the chance for success was reduced for all,[3][7][6] or it became a contest between the would-be controllers that was largely determined by intelligence and luck.[1][4]

There was no evidence that a sphere of annihilation had intelligence or awareness, but some adventurers reported that one attacked them when they got too close.[5]

The chances of controlling a sphere of annihilation were greatly improved when in possession of a talisman of the sphere.[9][10][11]

The sphere also reacted strangely when it came in contact with portals, gate spells, and other inter-dimensional phenomenon like portable holes. There was a random chance that nothing would happen, the sphere was transported to the destination of the other phenomenon, or every creature and object within 180 feet (55 meters) was whisked off to a random plane of existence. The most likely outcome was that the sphere was simply destroyed, but it was a toss up between that and the other possibilities.[1][3][4][7][6] Dispel magic and mage's disjunction had no effect on a sphere, but a rod of cancellation that came in contact with a sphere resulted in a blast of mutual destruction that damaged everything within a 60 foot (18 meter) radius.[3][4][7][6]

HistoryEdit

Around 1346 DR, a 10-feet (3 meters) large sphere of annihilation appeared in Lutchq in Chessenta. To be more precise, it appeared in House Karanok's, the ruling family, torture chamber at the exact place where they were torturing a wizard, completely annihilating that one. The nobles then started to worship the sphere. Around 1370 DR, Tiamat modified the sphere. It started to create smaller ones and to double as a channeling device for the Chromatic Dragon's powers. This allowed her to grant divine spells to the members of House Karanok. These clerics of Tiamat, or Entropy as they called the sphere, also learned to become entropists.[12]

AppendixEdit

See AlsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford, Christopher Perkins, James Wyatt (2014). Dungeon Master's Guide 5th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 201. ISBN 978-0786965622.
  2. Gary Gygax (1979). Dungeon Masters Guide 1st edition. (TSR, Inc.), p. 124. ISBN 0-9356-9602-4.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 slade et al (November 1995). Encyclopedia Magica Volume IV. (TSR, Inc.), pp. 1268–1269. ISBN 0-7869-0289-2.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 Monte Cook, Jonathan Tweet, Skip Williams (July 2003). Dungeon Master's Guide 3.5 edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 279. ISBN 0-7869-2889-1.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 James Wyatt (June 2008). Dungeon Master's Guide 4th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 93. ISBN 978-0-7869-4880-2.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 Gary Gygax (1979). Dungeon Masters Guide 1st edition. (TSR, Inc.), p. 154. ISBN 0-9356-9602-4.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 David "Zeb" Cook (1989). Dungeon Master's Guide 2nd edition. (TSR, Inc.), p. 180. ISBN 0-88038-729-7.
  8. Monte Cook, Jonathan Tweet, Skip Williams (July 2003). Dungeon Master's Guide 3.5 edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 277. ISBN 0-7869-2889-1.
  9. Monte Cook, Jonathan Tweet, Skip Williams (July 2003). Dungeon Master's Guide 3.5 edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 280. ISBN 0-7869-2889-1.
  10. David "Zeb" Cook (1989). Dungeon Master's Guide 2nd edition. (TSR, Inc.), p. 181. ISBN 0-88038-729-7.
  11. Gary Gygax (1979). Dungeon Masters Guide 1st edition. (TSR, Inc.), p. 155. ISBN 0-9356-9602-4.
  12. Sean K. Reynolds, Jason Carl (November 2001). Lords of Darkness. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 136–138. ISBN 0-7869-1989-2.
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