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The Spine of the World was a mountain range that stretched across the northwest region of Faerûn from the Cold Run near the Sea of Moving Ice, to the Ice Spires north of the Silver Marches.[4][5]

Folks all across the lands of the Savage Frontier and the Silver Marches, particularly those in Scornubel, referred to the Spine as "the Wall".[7] On the winter days when the white snow covered faces of the peaks met the iron-gray of the sunless winter sky, it appeared as though the peaks were holding up sky.[5] To others, it simply marked the end of the world as they saw it.[3][7]

GeographyEdit

The Spine of the World mountains shielded the civilizations of the North from the freezing expanse of the Uttermost North,[2][8] that comprised the Reghed Glacier[4] and the Endless Ice Sea.[2]

Geographical FeaturesEdit

To many Faerûnians, the Spine of the World was simply an endless, nearly–impassable range of high, jagged, perpetually ice-covered mountains. While the western-most edge of the Spine was penetrated by a circuitous, always dangerous trade route to Icewind Dale, the rest of the range was not even approached by those without a stout heart.[5]

Some of the mountains in this range stood over 20,000 feet (6.1 kilometers) tall, and all but the smallest were covered in snow and ice all year–round.[3]

Three peaks to seem as one,
Behind ye the morning sun.
— Bruenor Battlehammer reciting the first part of a dwarven song, whilst at Fourthpeak.[9]

There were four well known sister peaks that were referred to as Firstpeak, Secondpeak, Thirdpeak, and Fourthpeak.[10] The sister mountains were so similar in height that they seems to form a single line.[9]

The northern slopes of the mountains had plentiful enough trees that loggers of the Ten Towns would risk regular treks back-and-forth across the tundras.[11] The southern slopes, located near the Druarwood and Moonwood forests, were referred to as the Lands Against the Wall.[6]

ClimateEdit

As expected for mountains of that height, the Spine of the World experienced devastating, icy winds.[12] As a result, the mountains experienced frequent rock slides.[3]

Notable LocationsEdit

Natural FeaturesEdit

SettlementsEdit

Ancestral Mounds
Keeps and Fortresses
Settlements
Temples and Monastaries

Rumors & LegendsEdit

Legends told that the innermost depths of the mountains held long-lost cities, lairs of dragons that had been completely abandoned, and even the frozen remains of dinosaurs.[2]

Some sages believed the mists surrounding the Spine of the World's peaks were home to white dragons or vampiric entities that could transform into clouds. It was said that no mortal person has ever traversed this Realm of the Mists to reach the Realm of the Gods that lay just beyond.[3]

InhabitantsEdit

Those creatures that did inhabit the Spine were not spoken of in polite company, and their propensity to raid the lands below kept the conifer-cloaked, stag-roamed rolling foothills relatively uninhabited (as though the Savage Frontier and the Silver Marches were packed)―but it should come as no surprise that several fierce barbarian tribes inhabited these lands, traveling between summer and winter camps.[5]

AppendixEdit

AppearancesEdit

Video Games

External linksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Ed Greenwood (October 1990). Dwarves Deep. (TSR, Inc.), p. 57. ISBN 0-88038-880-3.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 slade, Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Steven E. Schend, Paul Jaquays, Steve Perrin (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (The Wilderness). (TSR, Inc), p. 43. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Ed Greenwood and Jason Carl (July 2002). Silver Marches. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 32. ISBN 0-7869-2835-2.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 74. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 169. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 Ed Greenwood and Jason Carl (July 2002). Silver Marches. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 33. ISBN 0-7869-2835-2.
  7. 7.0 7.1 R.A. Salvatore, Jeffrey Ludwig, Matthew Sernett, James Wyatt (November 19, 2013). “Campaign Book”. Legacy of the Crystal Shard (Wizards of the Coast), p. 59. ISBN 978-0-7869-6464-2.
  8. Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 108. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  9. 9.0 9.1 R.A. Salvatore (February 2001). The Icewind Dale Trilogy Collector's Edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 620. ISBN 978-0786918119.
  10. Eric L. Boyd (1999). Drizzt Do'Urden's Guide to the Underdark. (TSR, Inc), p. 35. ISBN 0-7869-1509-9.
  11. slade (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (Cities and Civilization). (TSR, Inc), p. 29. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  12. Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 109. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 Black Isle Studios (June 2000). Designed by Matt Norton. Icewind Dale. Interplay.
  14. 14.0 14.1 slade, Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Steven E. Schend, Paul Jaquays, Steve Perrin (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (The Wilderness). (TSR, Inc), p. 45. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  15. Philip Athans (2008). A Reader's Guide to R. A. Salvatore's the Legend of Drizzt. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 134. ISBN 0-7869-4915-5.
  16. R.A. Salvatore (February 2001). The Icewind Dale Trilogy Collector's Edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 619–621. ISBN 978-0786918119.
  17. Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 95. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  18. Philip Athans (2008). A Reader's Guide to R. A. Salvatore's the Legend of Drizzt. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 137. ISBN 0-7869-4915-5.
  19. Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 105. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  20. slade, Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Steven E. Schend, Paul Jaquays, Steve Perrin (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (The Wilderness). (TSR, Inc), p. 14. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  21. Ed Greenwood and Jason Carl (July 2002). Silver Marches. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 78. ISBN 0-7869-2835-2.
  22. R.A. Salvatore (July 2003). The Thousand Orcs. (Wizards of the Coast). ISBN 978-0786929801.
  23. slade (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (Cities and Civilization). (TSR, Inc), p. 21. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  24. R.A. Salvatore (February 2001). The Icewind Dale Trilogy Collector's Edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 439. ISBN 978-0786918119.
  25. Black Isle Studios (August 2002). Designed by J.E. Sawyer. Icewind Dale II. Interplay.
  26. Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 121. ISBN 978-0786966004.
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